The Fog 1980

The Fog is a John Carpenter Horror Classic that came out in 1980.  The film stars three classic women of Horror.  Adrienne Barbeau, Jamie Lee Curtis, and the woman best known for her shower scene in Pyscho, Janet Leigh. The cast also includes Hal Holbrock as Father Malone and even the director, John Carpenter, makes an appearance playing Bennet.

The film takes place in the sleepy town of Antonio Bay which is looking forward to their centennial.  The town is in full swing preparing for the event when events start to shake the festive mood in town.  Unexplained things began to happen such as televisions turning itself on and pay phones ringing simultaneously is enough to set a few nerves on edge.

As these odd events are happening Father Malone is in his study when a rock falls opening showing a hole in the wall. Upon investigation of this opening the Father finds a journal that was written about 100 years ago.  Inside the diary secrets about six of the towns founding fathers are revealed and only if they knew what would happen to the town because of their actions things may have been differently.

After we learn about the terrible deeds that the six men had committed on the clipper ship Elizabeth Dane, stranger things begin to happen around town.  A mysterious fog appears out to sea and begins moving toward land.  Three local men are out on their boat when the fog over takes them and something appears within the fog.  Two of the men cannot help but to investigate this strange fog and as they do what is hidden inside the fog ensures this will be their last night on earth.

The film continues on from this point as we are introduced to more townspeople. The local radio DJ Stevie Wayne (Barbeau) has her own early foreshadowing of what is to come when a piece of drift wood her son gives her causes a small fire at the radio station.

What makes The Fog a great Horror film is not just a great cast of actors but the use of foreshadowing that Carpenter is able to pull off in the film.  Also the menace of watching the fog slowly roll into town engulfing everything in its way adds to the excitement.  The ghosts within the fog coming out to kill those it can find adds to the excitement as we watch people try and run from the every growing fog.

The film does require viewers to watch the action and listen to the plot and things that go happen to help build some of the suspense.  The warnings that come from Stevie over the towns radio station are another element that help to add to the suspense of film.  Her cries and warnings to the townspeople almost begging them to get indoors and away from the fog as there is something there.  When you add in the fear of those trying to out run the fog and find a save place continues to bring you more and more into the desperation of those running.

The Fog is one of those films that combines many elements of a good story and plot devices into it at the same movie.  There is the suspense, the element of revenge, and a long hidden secret.  All of these entwined together make John Carpenter’s The Fog a classic horror movie.

2 thoughts on “The Fog 1980

  1. Its been many years since I saw the Fog but I remember loving it, I love walking in fog so this movie really appealed to me. Did anyone ever see the remake? I thought they did it right the first time so I never watched it.

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  2. I’m not sure about the remake of the film but part of me saw The Mist a twist on the Fog. Instead of having ghostly pirates you have ghostly creatures. Of course The Mist had other differences but it used some great tricks The Fog utilized.

    The key being not know what is out there in the dark and the way the people involved have to stay clear of it to live.

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