Nightmare November : Is Freddy’s Dead really that bad?

If you ask me, “Freddy’s Dead – The Final Nightmare” gets a bad rap. Why is this? Why do fans object to this film so much? Well, to be fair it is the most disconnected from the rest of the series, having now abandoned the Alice storyline which had been the running canon – from Nancy to Kristen, to Alice, each of the heroines passing the torch down the line keeping the narrative fresh. But Freddy’s Dead might have taken too wide a step off the path for fans to accept and understand, and the choice of going 3D didn’t do it any favors either. However, I do believe this film does have its moments and is worth another look from fans of horror and the franchise alike! Let’s check it out!

For those not in the know, -SPOILER ALERT- The story follows the “last” of the Elm Street children, John Doe… no, really, that’s his name, played by Shon Greenblatt, a wandering amnesia stricken insomniac who is sent back to Springwood by Freddy for unknown reasons – reasons we find out later are for Freddy to find his daughter and escape the bonds of Springwood. Along the way, it’s more or less a typical run-through of victims for Freddy, with some creative and over the top death scenes, though the body count is kept to a relative minimum. The film culminates with Freddy being brought into the real world and having the final showdown with his daughter in a somewhat campy manner, even for Freddy’s antics. Not too bad, but I can see why fans might not have taken to it at the time.

As a seasoned member of the Nightmare on Elm Street team, Rachel Talalay makes her directorial debut in the 6th installment, addressing the question of who Freddy Krueger was before he was caught, giving us a bit more exposition than what Marge did for Nancy in part 1. It was the familiar fable about Freddy from parts 1 through 5, and it’s here where I find the first improvement. Usually exposition tends to water down a character/story, but in my opinion, it plays out well, giving us enough to carry the story forward with something new. That’s one of the better qualities of the film; it takes chances with a well-loved, well-established character. And like Jason Goes to Hell, or Halloween 3, and other films that tried to break from the patterns set, it was not as well-received as they had hoped.

We all know who Freddy is at this point, so there’s really nothing to hide. We can only learn more! Pop culture at the time had forced New Line’s hand to tease Freddy a bit, making him a bit more humorous in his antics, but again, in my opinion, I think it worked out well enough… not perfect mind you, but this is Freddy Krueger! One of the few slasher villains with a personality, arguably the best and most colorful! While the comedy at times did cloud over the intended horror, I feel it works for the character(s). It has been one of the discerning traits of Freddy. Having that strong personality has helped him become the icon of horror he is today.

So, why do we watch these films? For the kills, of course! Slasher films are known for their ever-inventive style of death scenes and here, well you can’t deny that they are memorable. While the violence is toned down a bit it’s not without imagination. From Carlos’s death by nails-on-a-chalk-board, this scene spends several minutes with its build-up leading to Carlos’s demise. It’s fun and terrifying, really putting you in Carlos’s perspective. How about Spencer? Who can forget the power glove? While I might gag at the shameless product placement, it is nonetheless creative. Again, the scene spends several minutes in its own element before giving us what we came to see! The lack of a body count, too, allows a bit more time to expand on the ones that got the axe (glove) making their scenes that much more unforgettable. Another quality here, that apart from a few throughout the franchise, all these characters are memorable, I my opinion. It’s a relatively lean cast with a few recognizable faces, such as Breckin Meyer, Lisa Zane, Yaphet Kotto, and some interesting cameos by Tom Arnold, Roseanne Barr, and Johnny Depp. Ha! Freddy gets one over on Glenn again during a bizarre twist on a familiar PSA. The scene gets a chuckle out of me every time! And while the acting is by no means Oscar-winning it is believable; you can tell the actors are having a good time, and I think that’s all you can ask for in any film.

It wraps up rather abruptly with a slideshow recap of the five previous films while the credits roll, with a perfect song by Iggy Pop to end, well “end” the franchise. Would’ve been nice to have a “Spoiler Alert” back then! But here it is!

As a kid, I had a bad habit of watching franchise films out of order, and Freddy’s Dead was one of the first I ever saw! I guess part “6” wasn’t exactly the best jumping on point, ha! So many songs have been written around Nightmare on Elm Street either for the films themselves or in general from The Fat Boys to Will Smith, to Tuesday Knight’s intro from Part 4.

It’s amazing to see what an influence these films had on not only the fans but the industry itself. Hell, New Line was on its last leg before Wes came along. It was a dare from the start, and New Line has been known since then as the house that Freddy built. And that’s another element that we can appreciate in Freddy’s Dead, it was a dare! As I say, it took chances, something that movies and studios today just don’t do anymore. It has survived some turbulent times, such as the writers’ strike of 1988 and being developed in a dying company. Could this, as well as being handled by some of the best in writing, directing, and effects have fostered this one of a kind creativity? I will say this, it has been a great inspiration for myself, as well as countless others, so I think it’s fair to say that Freddy’s Dead isn’t that bad. Again, I may be bias, but The Final Nightmare will always be something special to me. If I could ask the fans to give it another chance with a little more open appreciation for what it is, I think we can all remember that Every town has an Elm Street!

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