Archive for the News Category

HorrorAddicts.net 126, Writer’s Workshop Winner

Posted in News with tags , , , , , , , on May 21, 2016 by Emerian Rich

HA tag

Horror Addicts Episode# 126
SEASON 11!

Horror Hostess: Emerian Rich & Stacy Rich

Intro Music by: Valentine Wolfe

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writer workshop winner | valentine wolfe | tomb of liegia & an evening with poe

Find all articles and interviews at: http://www.horroraddicts.net

 

162 days till halloween

adam sandler, murder, halloween, costume, interview with the vampire, anne rice, lestat, tom cruise, brad pitt, queen of the damned, prince lestat, blood paradise, universal, akasha, vampire, chronicles, robert downey jr., rutger hauer, feast of all saints, pandora, david watson, the box jumper, lisa mannetti, free fiction, alex s. johnson, clowns, mcdonalds, creepy, japanese commercials, once upon a scream, dj tryer, shannon lawrence, facebook release party, the rose garden, wicked gardens, through dolls eyes, jesse orr, kids, horror parenting, r l stine, s e hinton, outsiders, rumblefish, that was then this is now, the bloody inn, chantal noordeloos, ghastly games, firefly games, monster high uno, morbid meals, dan shaurette, silence of the lambs, liver, beef kidney, nightmare fuel, d j pitsiladis, robert the doll, creepy doll, band pool, valentine wolfe, crystal connor, victorville massacre, a tricky treat, firghtening flix, kbatz, kristin battestella, tomb of liegia, and evening with poe, vincent price, the tell tale heart, dream within a dream, facebook, stacy rich, dead mail, jane, mimielle, elder goth, fashion, jeff, stephen king, dr. sleep, the shining, the good marriage, the stand, storm of the century, langoliers, artistic license, mice?, adam, the walking dead, dice, friday the 13th, ladder, bianca, anthologies, blog editor, what we are looking for, lynn mcsweeney,  writer’s workshop, j. malcolm stewart

 

 

Wicked Gardens
http://www.lulu.com/shop/rogue-planet-press/wicked-gardens/paperback/product-22628390.html

 

Once Upon a Scream

https://www.createspace.com/6137489

 

 

“Broken Pieces” by Valentine Wolfe

http://valentinewolfe.bandcamp.com/track/broken-pieces

HorrorAddicts.net blog Kindle syndicated

http://www.amazon.com/HorrorAddicts-net/dp/B004IEA48W/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1431022701&sr=8-1&keywords=horroraddicts.net

 

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Write in re: ideas, questions, opinions, horror cartoons, favorite movies, etc…

horroraddicts@gmail.com

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h o s t e s s

Emerian Rich

s t a f f

David Watson, Stacy Rich, Dan Shaurette, KBatz (Kristin Battestella), Mimielle, Killion Slade, D.J. Pitsiladis, Jesse Orr, A.D. Vick, Mimi Williams, Lisa Vasquez, Alex S. Johnson

Want to be a part of the HA staff? Email horroraddicts@gmail.com

b l o g  / c o n t a c t / s h o w . n o t e s

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Once Upon a Scream now on Kindle!

Posted in News with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 21, 2016 by Emerian Rich

HorrorAddicts.net Press is proud to announce that our 4th anthology entitled Once Upon a Scream is now on Kindle! This book is edited by Dan Shaurette and it takes the classic fairy tales that you grew up with and gives them a horror twist.

Once Upon a Scream

OnceUponAScreamFront…there was a tradition of telling tales with elements of the fantastic along with the frightful. Adults and children alike took heed not to go into the deep, dark woods, treat a stranger poorly, or make a deal with someone-or something-without regard for the consequences. Be careful of what you wish for, you just might get it.

From wish-granting trolls, to plague curses, and evil enchantresses, these tales will have you hiding under the covers in hopes they don’t find you. So lock your doors, shutter your windows, and get ready to SCREAM.

A return to darker foreboding fairy tales not for children.
Not everyone lives happily ever after.

Stories include:

“The Black Undeath” by Shannon Lawrence: There was a plague no one speaks about, one much worse than the Black Death. “The Black Undeath” combines the ravages of the plague and leprosy with the tale of Rumpelstiltskin.

Shannon Lawrence is  a fan of all things fantastical and frightening, Shannon Lawrence writes primarily horror and fantasy,  You can find her at thewarriormuse.com

“Melody of Bones” by Nickie Jamison:  This is a delightful mashup of the German tales of the “Singing Bone” and “The Pied Piper of Hamlin.” Death can make beautiful music.

Nickie Jamison’s erotic fiction has been published in the Coming Together Among the Stars and the Coming Together Outside the Box anthologies.

“The Godmother’s Bargain” by Alison McBain: This story is based on Cinderella but instead of relying on a fairy godmother, Cinderella makes a deal with the devil.

Alison McBain  has over thirty publications in magazines and anthologies. You can read her blog at alisonmcbain.com

“Leila” by Dan Shaurette: This is a story about vampires and an old witch that lives in a haunted forest in a far away land.

Dan Shaurette is a goth-geek from Phoenix, AZ and he is the writer of  Black Magic and
Black Jack, you can visit him at: MattBlackBooks.com

“Nothing to Worry About” by Charles Frierman: Nothing killed Old Smelty, don’t let it kill you too.

Charles Frierman is  works as a children’s storyteller at the local library, but writing has always been
his passion.

“The Cursed Child” by C.S. Kane: Witches do what they must to save a child.

C.S. Kane’s debut horror novella, Shattered is out now. You can find out more about her at: http://www.cskane.com/

“The Healer’s Gift” by Lynn McSweeney: A pale boy with a whiff of the uncanny begs admission to a wounded healer’s cottage just before sunrise, conjuring her darkest fears of who – or what – he may be.

Lynn McSweeney writes mostly horror, fantasy, and science-fiction, or a blend of them, with an occasional foray into erotica.

“Briar” by K.L. Wallis: “Briar” is the story of a man who is lost deep in a mythical Black Forest, where he stumbles upon an abandoned fairy-tale palace with a forgotten sleeping beauty

K.L. Wallis  writes gothic fiction, high fantasy, mythological fiction, and
contemporary folk-lore you can find her at: https://restrictedquill.wordpress.com

“Curse of the Elves” by Sara E. Lundberg: This story gives a horrifying spin on the old tale “The Shoemaker and the Elves.” What if the elves were grotesque murderers and you wanted them to go away.

Sara E. Lundberg  writes and edits primarily fantasy and horror. She is also an editor and contributor for the Confabulator Cafe. You can find her online at SELundberg.com

“Lake Tiveden” by MD Maurice: The modern retelling of the legend of Tiveden and the epic encounter between a fisherman, his daughter and the fearsome Nokken.

MD Maurice has been writing and publishing erotic, Dark Fantasy and mainstream fiction since early 2001. She has been previously published in several print anthologies

“Wax Shadow” by Emerian Rich: Horror fairytale modern retelling of “The Shadow” by Hans Christian Andersen.

Emerian Rich is the author of the vampire book series, Night’s Knights, and Artistic License. You can find her at: http://emzbox.com/

“Without Family Ties” by Chantal Boudreau: This is a modern horror tale based on the story of Pinocchio.

Chantal Boudreau is a  member of the Horror Writers Association, she writes and illustrates horror, dark fantasy and fantasy. You can find her at: http://chantellyb.wordpress.com

“Commanding the Stones” by Laurel Anne Hill: A murder, a troubled marriage, a mysterious benefactor and a Russian fairy tale add up to terror and redemption in the sewers of Paris.

Laurel Anne Hill’s award-winning novel, Heroes Arise, was published by KOMENAR in 2007. You can find her at: http://www.laurelannehill.com/

“Gollewon Ellee” by DJ Tyrer: Two young girls follow the Gollewon Ellee, Fairy Lights, and discover that not only are the Fair Folk real, they are stranger and more sinister than they imagined.

DJ Tyrer is the person behind Atlantean Publishing and has been widely published in anthologies and magazines in the UK, USA and elsewhere His website is: http://djtyrer.blogspot.co.uk/

“Mr. Shingles” by J. Malcolm Stewart: Bay Area boys meeting with a certain rhyming troll who may or may not still be living under the Carquinez Bridge.

J. Malcolm Stewart is a Northern California-based author, journalist and marketing professional. He is the author of several novels and short story collections. http://about.me/jaymal

“The Boy and His Teeth” by V. E. Battaglia: A cautionary tale against deceiving the Tooth Fairy.

V. E. Battaglia is primarily writes Science Fiction and Horror. His work can be found in the Zen of the Dead anthology from Popcorn Press and in the SNAFU: Hunters anthology.

“The Other Daughter” by Adam L. Bealby: It’s nice to see Hannah looking her old self, all bright-eyed and bushy-tailed. The problem is Hannah – the real Hannah – with her black nails and even blacker attitude, she’s already upstairs…

Adam L. Bealby writes weird fiction leaning heavily into fantasy, horror and arch satire. He dabbles in stories for children too. His short stories and comic work have been published in numerous anthologies. Find him at: @adamskilad

“Old and in the Way” by Wayne Faust: Atmospheric tale about an old man who can no longer do his duty.

Wayne Faust has been a full time music and comedy performer for over 40 years. While on the road performing he also writes fiction. You can find him at: www.waynefaust.com

HorrorAddicts.net Press

LIVE TWEET Tonight! @horroraddicts13

Posted in News with tags , , , on May 20, 2016 by Emerian Rich

Join us

TONIGHT!

Friday, May 20th, 2016

7pm-9pm PST

on Twitter for a LIVE Tweet event!

OnceUponAScreamFront

To celebrate the release of Once Upon a Scream, we’ll be watching our favorite fairy tale movie and live tweeting during it. Join us by watching your favorite fairy tale and including @horroraddicts13 and #OnceUponScream.

Don’t miss a minute of the fun, follow us now:

@horroraddicts13

@emzbox

Once Upon a Scream Author Spotlight: Adam L. Bealby

Posted in News with tags , , , , , , on May 20, 2016 by David Watson

Horroraddicts.net Publishing has recently published our 4th anthology called Once Upon a Scream. Remember the Fairy tales that you grew up reading? Well, they are back again with a horror twist. Once Upon a Scream includes 18 tales that are fantastic and frightful. One of the authors in this anthology is Adam L. Bealby and recently he talked to us about his writing:

What is your story in Once Upon A Scream called and what is it about?

OnceUponAScreamFrontThe Other Daughter’ is about changelings. And trolls. Or maybe it isn’t. The reader’s vantage point is a single mother struggling with her daughter’s teenage melodramatics. But then another daughter turns up on her doorstep. The same daughter, only how she was before she started wearing black and styling her hair into spikes and going out with some guy called Gerp or Goik.

This other daughter explains that she was kidnapped by trolls a few years back, swapped out for some troll kid – because trolls are lazy-ass creatures and are quite happy to dupe someone else to rear their young. All this time this other daughter has been their slave. But now she’s escaped and returned home to oust the changeling and reclaim her life.

So what’s our weirded-out mother to do?

What inspired the idea?

I love fairy tales, especially the brutal uncensored original versions. I have a few dusty tomes here on my bookshelf with some lovely tipped-in Arthur Rackham plates. So I was playing around with some traditional tales, trying to find a new angle, and it occurred to me that kids change when they hit their teens. Sort of like that scene in American Werewolf in London, only far worse. My daughter’s creeping up to her teens – From a parents point of view I can’t think of anything more terrifying!

When did you start writing?

Ever since I was a kid I’ve kept scrappy notebooks, full of scrappy half-ideas and truncated story beginnings. Having excised a couple of bad books from my system it’s only the last few years I’ve been really pleased with my output.

What are your favorite topics to write about?8255274

I love playing around with different genres, giving them a good stir. I guess most things I write will have an air of the fantastical or macabre about them. I like a bit of arch satire too, even slap-stick. Oh and I’m totally obsessed with imbuing my work with different levels of meaning, even if no one else notices and it’s all in my head! If a story can be interpreted in more than one way, like a certain troll story, say…

What are some of your influences?

259118131980s horror movies (see below), even if the influence isn’t overtly evident in my writing. Michael Moorcock’s had a huge impact on my output. And comics. Boy, do I like comics.

What do you find fascinating about the horror genre?

The fear! Chase the fear! Don’t let it get away! It all began age ten with a load of dusty VHS cassettes I found in my gran’s closet. They were all horror films. I’ve no idea why she had them. She didn’t even like horror. Watching films like Creepshowand The Thing by myself pretty much scared 25911813the living crap out of me. I’ve been chasing that bowel-clenching high ever since, whether on the screen or the printed page.

What are some of the works you have available?

My last published stories have featured in Pagan (Zimbell House Publishing), Darkness Abound (Migla Press), World Unknown Review Vol. 2 and Sirens (World Weaver Press)

But if you liked ‘The Other Daughter’ check out my story in Spooked (Bridge House Publishing).

What are you currently working on?

I’m writing a book-length young adult urban fantasy and touching up a weird holiday story about a couple who can only relate to each other by tormenting their son!

Where can we find you online?
I’m here

And here

Kbatz: Tomb of Ligeia and An Evening with Edgar Allan Poe

Posted in News with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 19, 2016 by Kristin Battestella

Frightening Flix

Tomb of Ligeia and An Evening with Edgar Allan Poe Surprisingly Good

Several months ago, I saw an interview with Cassandra Peterson-aka Elvira-discussing Tomb of Ligeia, one of her favorites in the American Pictures International’s Poe series by director Roger Corman. Unfortunately, for the life of me I couldn’t recall having seen this final adaptation starring Vincent Price. When the 1969 film came on out on a double billed DVD with An Evening with Edgar Allan Poe, I gave the set my full attention. Perhaps it’s not a total shocker since I like the rest of Corman’s Poe series, but Tomb of Ligeia and An Evening with Edgar Allan Poe are surprisingly good.

Verden Fell (Price) vows that his late wife Ligeia (Elizabeth Shepherd) will defy death. He becomes reclusive and keeps away from sunlight with his dark colored glasses-until the beautiful Rowena (also Shepherd) erroneously comes to his ruined abbey. The couple falls in love, despite Rowena’s previous attachment to Verden’s friend Christopher (John Westbrook). They marry, but Rowena is ill at ease in Ligeia’s former home. Ligeia’s Egyptian antiques are everywhere; her spirit seems to linger over Verden during the night, and there’s a nasty black cat about that makes her displeasure known.

Director Roger Corman (House of Usher, The Pit and the Pendulum) takes a few departures from his earlier Poe films by brightening up Tomb of Ligeia with natural locations and a little more romance than usual. Adapted by Robert Towne (Shampoo, Chinatown, Tequila Sunrise) from Poe’s short story, the analysis of mind and will power over death itself weaves the film together with ancient Egyptian allusions and plenty of ambiguity towards black cats. Each plot resolves satisfactory, but Poe’s twists and Corman’s interpretations leave the viewing thinking longer than prior pure shock conclusions.

Even though this is the last of the Poe pictures, Vincent Price looks younger here. His Verden is a little more sympathetic than his earlier, often evil roles. Not only is Price not as over the top as we love, but he’s actually sad sometimes, even pathetic with his dependence on his little glasses. But of course, Tomb of Ligeia does have the bizarrity we’d expect, including some ambiguity about necrophilia. Ew! Thankfully, Price looks good with Elizabeth Shepherd (Bleak House, Side Effects, Damien: Omen II). Any age difference doesn’t seem to factor in; they match well, and have nice, genuine chemistry. The more romantic tone between Verden and Rowena isn’t so tough to believe amid the scares. Nice as it is to have the sweet emotion amid the creeps; Shepherd is freaky in the duel bits as Ligeia. It’s obvious it is she, of course, but the showdown with Ligeia and the dream sequence with the ladies are well done. John Westbrook’s (The First Churchills) Christopher is in the odd middleman position in this love triangle, but his outside, sane perspective helps the audience balance out some of the horrors.

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While not as stylized as its Poe predecessor The Masque of the Red Death, Tomb of Ligeia has some beautiful natural locals and production. There’s a hefty amount of daylight scenes here-and they all work in the spooky, gothic, Early Victorian setting. There are some great ruined abbeys, the English countryside, and even a romantic stroll through Stonehenge. You might think these pieces don’t go together, but the morbid set interiors match the abbey in gothic look and spooky tone. The Victorian costumes are also early in style, alluding to a bit of the Bronte Sisters, Wuthering Heights, and Jane Eyre. And of course, there’s a very disturbing classic Corman dream sequence that scares better than some of the stranger, more bizarre visual dream trickery previously done.

Side B of our set offers more Vincent Price in a one-man show called An Evening with Edgar Allan Poe. Price showcases four tales from Poe in various stage settings, beginning with “The Tell Tale Heart.” I imagine you’re familiar with the tale, and Price is delightfully over the top here. His crazed style suits the story. The production here looks a little low and bare, but theatre fans can certainly enjoy this spirited Poe dramatization. “The Sphinx” is actually a Poe story that’s new to me. Price changes his looks and time period for each tale, strengthening his suave approach to the audience. He is clearly enjoying the punch line here, and this tale is better dressed than “The Tell Tale Heart.” Some might think a one-man production is stale and boring, but swift camera movement keeps things fresh. Not the crazy angles and dizzying modern zooms, but there’s just enough cuts and close ups to create the illusions needed.

So, that’s how “The Cask of Amontillado” is pronounced! I was never quite sure. The older Price is made up even older here for this unusual interpretation. You’d expect to see this one played out, not in effect told as perhaps “The Tell-Tale Heart” can only be. Price, however, does the voices of both men involved, playing on the amusement of the story and the unreliable status of the narrator. The camera again moves with him, cutting from several sides and using duel tricks almost like Gollum and Smeagol in The Two Towers. It’s a simple maneuver, but it works with the very handsomely dressed dining room stage.

It’s strange that director Kenneth Johnson (V, Alien Nation) would do “The Pit and the Pendulum” here in 1972 when Roger Corman did the feature length film ten years earlier. Nevertheless, Price looks the old and crazy part. Each tale has progressed his age, the time period, and the story’s deceit. This short here is more abstract and dream like than Corman’s back story filled movie. The fire and brimstone effects in this Pit go for more frights rather than a Twilight Zone twist ending. You would think Vincent Price effectively reading books line for line onscreen would be boring, but no. The stories dramatized in these readings are all told in the past tense with Poe’s great unreliable narrator telling his askew interpretation to the audience. Even though it may look old or too theatre to modern audiences, An Evening with Edgar Allan Poe is perfect for Vincent Price fans, film students, or literature teachers looking for a short and sweet visual accompaniment for the classroom.

The DVD set of Tomb of Ligeia and An Evening with Edgar Allan Poe is relatively simplistic, with only a commentary of Roger Corman and Elizabeth Shepherd. It’s a little slow in pacing, but fun and informative for the die-hard fan. The subtitles for Ligeia are great, too. Fans of the previous Poe pictures or sixties horror films can enjoy Tomb of Ligeia, but period piece and gothic fans should tune in, too. However, hardcore viewers looking for a blood fest and straight horror should skip these stylized tales. Likewise, I also don’t know about cat lovers enjoying Tomb of Ligeia. Feline folks will delight in the pesky cat scenarios, but cat enthusiasts won’t like some of the black cat bashing, either. Ah, it’s the beauty of Poe, something for everyone!

HorrorAddicts.net Release Party – BayCon

Posted in News with tags , , , , on May 18, 2016 by Emerian Rich

baycon

Join us at BayCon 2016!

May 28th, 2016

1pm PST

Connect 1

Once Upon a Scream Release Party

Favors, door prizes, autographs, readings!

Come join us.

Morbid Meals – Tribute to Silence of the Lambs – Beef Liver with Braised Fava Beans

Posted in News with tags , , , , , , , , , on May 17, 2016 by Dan Shaurette

MorbidMeals2

EXAMINATION

Liver gets a bad rap. It says a lot about a meat that folks typically cover up their poorly prepared liver with something as strong as onions.

However, with the right preparation and sauce, liver is more tender and just as delicious as any cut of beef. Leave it to Hannibal Lecter to suggest to us a fine pairing of liver with fava beans served with a nice Chianti wine.

Liver_Fava_Chianti

ANALYSIS

Servings: 2

Ingredients

8 Tbsp butter, divided
1/2 cup diced pancetta or bacon
1/2 cup diced white onion
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 lb fava beans, shelled and peeled if fresh
1/2 cup chicken stock
1 lb young beef liver, which should provide 2 slices
1 cup flour, seasoned with salt and pepper
1/2 cup red wine, Chianti preferred

Apparatus

  • Saucepan
  • Skillet

Procedure

  1. In a saucepan, melt 2 Tbsp of butter over medium-low heat then add the pancetta bacon. Cook until the fat renders out; about 5 minutes.
  2. Add onions and garlic and sauté until the onions soften; about 10 minutes.
  3. Set aside half to this for later.
  4. Into half of the onion and pancetta mixture, add the beans and stock. Simmer for about 15 minutes, allowing the stock to thicken.
  5. While the beans simmer, dredge your liver in the seasoned flour.
  6. In a skillet, melt the remaining 6 Tbsp of butter.
  7. Fry the floured liver in the melted butter until golden brown; about 2 to 3 minutes each side. Set the cooked livers aside and cover to keep warm.
  8. Into your skillet, add the reserved onion and pancetta mixture and the wine. Simmer until the sauce thickens; about 5 minutes.
  9. When the beans and sauce are done, plate your liver and spoon sauce of the sauce over it. Serve with a side of beans. If you have extra sauce, serve it in a sauceboat.

DISSECTION

If you cannot find fava beans, lima beans are an accessible and acceptable substitute. If you buy canned beans of either kind, you should still simmer them just as long, just don’t stir too often, or you’ll have refried beans.

POST-MORTEM

I normally hate liver and onions. This, however, was SO AMAZING. It practically melted in my mouth. The pancetta bacon brings another layer of friendly flavor to the dish as well. It was a huge hit and very inexpensive. So Clarice, tell the lambs to stop crying and enjoy liver again.

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