Kidnapped Week! Guest Blog: “Historical Inspiration for the Supernatural Story” by Maynard Blackoak

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Historical Inspiration for the Supernatural Story

Maynard Blackoak

As a writer, I find inspiration around me. Somedays, it seems all I have to do is look outside the door. There are other times it is a task to find it. Sometimes it comes to me out of the blue, in an unexpected place. For example, listening to old legends and stories told by the elderly can spark the flame of imagination. From a simple tale that had been retold for generations, a new and harrowing tale is born.

Since I was a young child, I was told of the infamous gunfight in Ingalls, Oklahoma Territory. Many times, I have visited the old ghost town of weathered structures, and visualized in my mind what that fateful day would have been like. Often time, I would place a hand on spots that looked like decayedbullet holes, and believe I could smell the spent gunpowder.

It was a no-brainer the first tale I wrote for Eerie Trails of the Wild Weird West was Claire Simmons, a tale that revolves around that legendary gun battle. I had relived the incident so many times in my head, it was as if I had witnessed it firsthand. I knew most the ins and outs of the story. I just needed to do a little research to fill in a few blanks. Throw in an eerie element, and the story took on a whole new perspective.

Spending a significant amount of childhood in Oklahoma, I was also exposed to many Native legends. One of those old tales made it into my collection in the story, Willows of the Mourning Dove. While I did embellish on the original folklore, certain aspects remained true to the story as I remember hearing it.

Another story, Deception at Skull Creek, was based upon various pieces of gossip I have heard throughout my life. I have often overheard women, and men too for that matter, retelling a story of a certain party. Sometimes the stories involved a granule of truth that somehow had managed to grow in depravity like a snowball rolling downhill. Though not one of the stories occurred during the time of the Wild West, it was not a stretch of the imagination to apply their sordid elements to a story of that era.

Cimarron Rose was a story based partly on fact and partly on rumors of the time. Of course, imagination took the gossip to a whole other level to give it a taste of horror. Still, if not for stories I had heard about the real Rose of Cimarron, this story would most likely have not popped in my head. Besides, rumors normally make for a much juicier read than the truth.

Though, off the top of my head, I cannot think of another story in Eerie Trails of the Wild Weird West that was inspired by folklore or gossip, I am certain one, or the other, or both, influenced a tale or two—at least marginally. After all, there is not much telling what lurks in the cobwebbed corners of my memories. Sometimes, they even reveal themselves subconsciously. One thing I do believe is readers of this collection will enjoy the strange ride through the Wild West.

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