Multimedia Opportunities at HOW Con 2020!

Don’t have time to read everything at the HorrorAddicts.net Online Writers Conference this week? Prefer to Learn with Audio? Enjoy Video Workshops instead? HOW has you covered for a Multimedia Writing Experience!

Browse a variety of Technological Teaching Tools including:

Next Great Horror Writer Podcast Series

HorrorAddicts.net African American Multimedia Conference Video Coverage

Horror Podcasting with Nancy Kilpatrick

Back to Basics: Writing Like We’re 10 Video Prompts

SecondLife Workshops with Sumiko Saulson

Even when our Live Conference Events end, HOW remains as an Online Archive to browse Chat Transcripts, Author Panels, and Writing Workshops brought to you by HorrorAddicts.net!

 

Horror Addicts.net Online Writers Conference Be a Panelist!

Authors, Presenters:
Want to panel at HOW Con? Participate in 4 easy steps.

Step1: Join the free forum.
http://horroraddictswriters.freeforums.net/

 

Step 2: Figure out what you want to do.

What kind of workshops are we looking for at HOW, you ask?
~ Interactive forum based workshops, worksheets, writing exercises or prompts in any genre or writing skill level.

~ Articles and essays with writing tips, experiences, or references, again in all genres or on technical tips, formatting, grammar, etc.

~ Editor, Agent, and Publisher essays, experiences, or feedback If you are an author, editor, agent, or publisher and would like to do a Q&A, chat, or live audio/visual event.

~ Articles and tips on marketing, networking, promotion, and social media for authors.

~Genre-specific essays, tips, trends on world building, characters, genre perimeters, etc.

 

Step 3: Submit ideas /worksheets, etc to our email.

“Don’t forget if you are interested in presenting a workshop as part of the HOW Conference, you should submit your materials to horroraddicts@gmail.com.”

Step 4: Wait for peeps to go and read your stuff during the con and answer the participate in forum discussion.

Horror Addicts.net Online Writers Conference Feb 24-28, 2019

Attention Literary Horror Addicts, Wicked Women Writers, Masters of the Macabre, and any fellow demented author folk!

HorrorAddicts.net is having our very own Online Writing Conference in February 2019!

Authors, Editors, Agents, Publishers, Readers, and Writers are invited to take part in the Horror Addicts.net Online Writers Conference and learn HOW to hone their literary craft thanks to interactive online forums, live chats, writing exercises, and more FREE opportunities to sharpen your skills wherever you are and whatever you write. Yes, the HOW Conference is open to any genre and general writing topics, not just horror!

What kind of workshops are we looking for at HOW, you ask?
  • Interactive forum based workshops, worksheets, writing exercises or prompts in any genre or writing skill level
  • Articles and essays with writing tips, experiences, or references, again in all genres or on technical tips, formatting, grammar, etc
  • Editor, Agent, and Publisher essays, experiences, or feedback
  • If you are an author, editor, agent, or publisher and would like to do a Q&A, chat, or live audio/visual event
  • Articles and tips on marketing, networking, promotion, and social media for authors
  • Genre-specific essays, tips, trends on world building, characters, genre perimeters, etc
Have an idea? Don’t hesitate to ask! If it is technologically possible, we want to do it at HOW!

Register now on our Free Forum at http://horroraddictswriters.freeforums.net for more Information or to chat RIGHT NOW in our open Pre-Conference area with your fellow writers!

To participate in HOW,  you must register at our Online Writers Conference Forum. Don’t worry, it’s free and Easy! During the week of the conference February 24-28 2019, the Workshop boards will be open. Each board will contain the workshop threads, conveniently sorted by genre so our experts can present their tips, worksheets, brainstorming, and more. All you have to do interact – host your workshop, browse the forum, participate in one, two events or as many aspects as possible and get inspired with HOW!

Workshop Applicants should submit their workshop proposal no later than February 1 to horroraddicts@gmail.com. Please use the subject heading Horror Addicts Online Conference Query so we recognize your message.
A general outline of your workshop should be included in the body of the email, along with details about any worksheets or technical materials you may need or will be using. If you would also like to schedule a Shout Box chat as part of your workshop or any other kind of live or daily event rather than or in addition to a stagnant forum workshop, let us know.
Of course, please include your contact information so we can respond with any questions about your workshop or confirm your approval as part of HOW.  Please allow up to a week to reply to your application query. If you don’t hear from us by February 7, please contact us again or join the Pre-Conference area of the HOW forum for the latest information.
Thank you for your participation and we look forward to seeing you at the Horror Addicts.net Online Writers Conference!

Horror Addicts.net Online Writers Conference Feb 24-28, 2019

Attention Literary Horror Addicts, Wicked Women Writers, Masters of the Macabre, and any fellow demented author folk!

HorrorAddicts.net is having our very own Online Writing Conference in February 2019!

Authors, Editors, Agents, Publishers, Readers, and Writers are invited to take part in the Horror Addicts.net Online Writers Conference and learn HOW to hone their literary craft thanks to interactive online forums, live chats, writing exercises, and more FREE opportunities to sharpen your skills wherever you are and whatever you write. Yes, the HOW Conference is open to any genre and general writing topics, not just horror!

What kind of workshops are we looking for at HOW, you ask?
  • Interactive forum based workshops, worksheets, writing exercises or prompts in any genre or writing skill level
  • Articles and essays with writing tips, experiences, or references, again in all genres or on technical tips, formatting, grammar, etc
  • Editor, Agent, and Publisher essays, experiences, or feedback
  • If you are an author, editor, agent, or publisher and would like to do a Q&A, chat, or live audio/visual event
  • Articles and tips on marketing, networking, promotion, and social media for authors
  • Genre-specific essays, tips, trends on world building, characters, genre perimeters, etc
Have an idea? Don’t hesitate to ask! If it is technologically possible, we want to do it at HOW!

Register now on our Free Forum at http://horroraddictswriters.freeforums.net for more Information or to chat RIGHT NOW in our open Pre-Conference area with your fellow writers!

To participate in HOW,  you must register at our Online Writers Conference Forum. Don’t worry, it’s free and Easy! During the week of the conference February 24-28 2019, the Workshop boards will be open. Each board will contain the workshop threads, conveniently sorted by genre so our experts can present their tips, worksheets, brainstorming, and more. All you have to do interact – host your workshop, browse the forum, participate in one, two events or as many aspects as possible and get inspired with HOW!

Workshop Applicants should submit their workshop proposal no later than February 1 to horroraddicts@gmail.com. Please use the subject heading Horror Addicts Online Conference Query so we recognize your message.
A general outline of your workshop should be included in the body of the email, along with details about any worksheets or technical materials you may need or will be using. If you would also like to schedule a Shout Box chat as part of your workshop or any other kind of live or daily event rather than or in addition to a stagnant forum workshop, let us know.
Of course, please include your contact information so we can respond with any questions about your workshop or confirm your approval as part of HOW.  Please allow up to a week to reply to your application query. If you don’t hear from us by February 7, please contact us again or join the Pre-Conference area of the HOW forum for the latest information.
Thank you for your participation and we look forward to seeing you at the Horror Addicts.net Online Writers Conference!

Horror Addicts.net Online Writers Conference Feb 24-28, 2019

Attention Literary Horror Addicts, Wicked Women Writers, Masters of the Macabre, and any fellow demented author folk!

HorrorAddicts.net is having our very own Online Writing Conference in February 2019!

Authors, Editors, Agents, Publishers, Readers, and Writers are invited to take part in the Horror Addicts.net Online Writers Conference and learn HOW to hone their literary craft thanks to interactive online forums, live chats, writing exercises, and more FREE opportunities to sharpen your skills wherever you are and whatever you write. Yes, the HOW Conference is open to any genre and general writing topics, not just horror!

What kind of workshops are we looking for at HOW, you ask?
  • Interactive forum based workshops, worksheets, writing exercises or prompts in any genre or writing skill level
  • Articles and essays with writing tips, experiences, or references, again in all genres or on technical tips, formatting, grammar, etc
  • Editor, Agent, and Publisher essays, experiences, or feedback
  • If you are an author, editor, agent, or publisher and would like to do a Q&A, chat, or live audio/visual event
  • Articles and tips on marketing, networking, promotion, and social media for authors
  • Genre-specific essays, tips, trends on world building, characters, genre perimeters, etc
Have an idea? Don’t hesitate to ask! If it is technologically possible, we want to do it at HOW!

Register now on our Free Forum at http://horroraddictswriters.freeforums.net for more Information or to chat RIGHT NOW in our open Pre-Conference area with your fellow writers!

To participate in HOW,  you must register at our Online Writers Conference Forum. Don’t worry, it’s free and Easy! During the week of the conference February 24-28 2019, the Workshop boards will be open. Each board will contain the workshop threads, conveniently sorted by genre so our experts can present their tips, worksheets, brainstorming, and more. All you have to do interact – host your workshop, browse the forum, participate in one, two events or as many aspects as possible and get inspired with HOW!

Workshop Applicants should submit their workshop proposal no later than February 1 to horroraddicts@gmail.com. Please use the subject heading Horror Addicts Online Conference Query so we recognize your message.
A general outline of your workshop should be included in the body of the email, along with details about any worksheets or technical materials you may need or will be using. If you would also like to schedule a Shout Box chat as part of your workshop or any other kind of live or daily event rather than or in addition to a stagnant forum workshop, let us know.
Of course, please include your contact information so we can respond with any questions about your workshop or confirm your approval as part of HOW.  Please allow up to a week to reply to your application query. If you don’t hear from us by February 7, please contact us again or join the Pre-Conference area of the HOW forum for the latest information.
Thank you for your participation and we look forward to seeing you at the Horror Addicts.net Online Writers Conference!

Author Interview: Lily Luchesi

 

Who doesn’t love a good vampire novel? If you enjoy reading horror stories with strong female characters, lots of action and maybe a little romance, then you should check out the books of Lily Luchesi. If you’re not convinced then check out our interview with Lily:

When did you start writing?

I started writing with the goal of making it my career when I was eight years old. I had a teacher who inspired me and made me want to pursue it. I’ve always been creative, though. When I was little I used to draw quite a bit, and act out scenes with my “imaginary friends”. As I got older, I just started writing them down instead!

What are your favorite topics to write about?

Well, I will always love writing about monsters and creatures. They’ve been an obsession for me since I was a toddler and saw a vampire on an old Scooby-Doo rerun on the Cartoon Network. But I write about many deeper subjects, disguising them in between horror and action. I write about unconditional love, xenophobia, racism, LGBT+ issues, women’s rights, and the growing violence in America (particularly in my home city of Chicago).

I like strong female leads who don’t look like Victoria’s Secret models, and male co-stars who support and encourage them. Real people are flawed in many ways, so I believe characters should be as well.

What do you like best about vampires?

You know, that’s harder than you might think for me to answer. I don’t know what initially attracted me to vampires, but now that they’ve evolved so much, I think it’s an unnatural allure for danger. Even if a vamp is sexy, they’re still deadly. They might be the deadliest creature of them all, yet humans are undeniably attracted to them. I love that power they have over the human heart.

What was the first horror movie or horror novel you read?

The first horror movie I watched could be considered the cartoon version of Ray Bradbury’s The Halloween Tree, or possibly Hayao Miyazaki’s Spirited Away. Non-animated, that would be Carrie (the original version) when I was twelve.

My first horror novel was YA horror when I was ten, and that was The Cirque Du Freak Series by Darren Shan (also about vampires, you can see where my tastes ran). Adult horror was also Stephen King, I got a used copy of Rose Madder for free and fell madly in love with his writing.

What are some of your influences?

Stephen King is definitely a big influence. I love how so many of his books are interconnected (like with towns, characters, even plots) and that he can bring fear over seemingly innocuous things like those wind-up monkeys with the cymbals, or a painting, or even your own grandmother. It takes great talent to be able to do that.

Other horror authors who have influenced me are Edgar Allan Poe, Mary Shelley, Thomas Harris, and Darren Shan.

What do you find fascinating about the horror genre?

The fact that there are so many ways to scare people! And that fear doesn’t just come from gore and violence. It comes from the shadow outside your window at three in the morning, or the scraping sound you hear inside your walls when it’s quiet, or a strange car following you down a deserted road. Fear is the core of humanity, because fear fuels every emotion. Fear spiders? Kill them. Fear losing someone? Hold them. Fear failure? Work harder. Fear is everything and to be able to bring it, even a little, is power.

What are some of the works you have available?

I am the author of the Paranormal Detectives Series published by indie horror/UF great Vamptasy Publishing. The story follows mortal detective Danny Mancini as he discovers that monsters exist and are everywhere. In the first book, Stake-Out, he finds a vampire murdering a human and it sends his life into a tailspin. Angelica Cross, my female lead, recruits him to help the FBI apprehend the offending vampire and the series goes from there.

It’s not strict horror: there is a romantic subplot that plays a big part that readers discover slowly as they go through to book five, Last Rites. It deals with destiny and humanity and the true meaning of what constitutes a monster.

There are four books: Stake-Out, Miranda’s Rights, Life Sentence, Right To Silence, and Last Rites. The series is complete as it is, with book five being the “end of an era”, so when the series picks up again next year with book six, Skin Deep, it will be set further into the future after book five ends and won’t affect those original five books.

What are you currently working on?

Well, I just released my fifth book, Last Rites, on June 14th, and am now working on editing my December WWII urban fantasy release Never Again, which is a standalone spin-off of the Paranormal Detectives Series. It follows male siren Sean Wireman (whom you’ll meet in Last Rites) as he discovers his powers, and moves on from 16th century Israel, traveling over Europe, and eventually fighting for America in WWII, where he finds terrifying monsters being controlled by Nazis. It will feature some cameos of other PDS characters, too, for faithful readers, but will hopefully appeal to an entirely deeper demographic.

Where can we find you online?

You can find my books at http://smarturl.it/LilyLuchesiAmazon (I have plenty of other stories in anthologies, all of them horror)

You can find me on social media or my official site:

http://lilyluchesibooks.wix.com/lilyluchesi

http://facebook.com/lilyluchesi

http://twitter.com/LilyLuchesi

http://instagram.com/lilyluchesi

http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/7369101.Lily_Luchesi

#NGHW News 138

 

Hello, Addicts!

Well, how good were this week’s stories! I can’t tell you how happy I am that our judges did not agree. This way, we were blessed with seven stories instead of the promised three. And oh my Odin, what stories they were!

So this week’s challenge was to write 250 words about a monster. Seven monsters we were given, three survived to the next round and then one was picked and deemed worthy of the mini prize – Professional audio production of the winning short story.

Our stories, this week were:
1 LARVAE #teamsumiko
2 THE PET #teamdaphne
3 LINGUA #teamJC
4 BLOODWORM #teamjonathan
5 THE ODDMENTS MONSTER #teamadele
6 THE LAUGHING MAN #teamnaching
7 ALWAYS HUNGRY #teamcat
You can read and/or listen to all these brilliant stories here.

In the discussion after the stories were read, we learned some juicy deets about our beautiful, spooky host, Emz. Our leader into the night is scared of insects and monkeys! And even though the contestants have been warned, it will be interesting to see if any of them draw on this info for their next projects. Knowing what spooks the judges could give them a leg up or tear them down. Only time will tell if any of them dare to scare our dearest Emz.

But this discussion leads me to think … What do our fearsome fifteen fear? What makes our makers of fear jump in the night? I simply had to ask. (And if you’re wondering what scares me, it’s koalas.)

We had some super interesting answers. AE Kirk – our archaeologist – was freaked out by skeletons as a child. Sumiko – the author of LARVAE – has an irrational fear of maggots, which may explain her monster. Naching – our winner for this week’s challenge (oh, had I not mentioned that yet!) – is claustrophobic. Ten points to who can guess what JC is scared of …

One story, which I really wanted to share with you, was from our sweet Daphne. I will let her tell you the story…

“I am TERRIFIED of ladybugs. Yes, the little red and black beetles that populate gardens and children’s story books. I wasn’t always afraid of them–I wore a ladybug dress to my first day of kindergarten–but that all changed when I was ten.
My parents, after twenty-plus years of marriage, finally built their dream home in the Missouri countryside: a magazine-worthy log cabin situated on five acres of wooded land. All was well. The house was completed and we moved in. But at some point during the construction process, ladybugs had laid eggs in one of the interior rooms–specifically, what would become my room.
After a few weeks, the eggs hatched. Thousands of them. While the room had been open to the environment when they were deposited, it was now sealed, locking the beetles inside the house along with me. They were everywhere: in my bed, my clothes, my hair. Their tiny armored bodies blocked out the light that streamed through my windows as they swarmed toward what they thought was freedom. My father would vacuum my room every day (taking the wriggling, writhing mass of insects outside for disposal), only for more ladybugs to appear in their kin’s place. This continued for months before a significant majority of the monsters had been rehomed outside (where I assume they went on to reproduce more of their abhorrent kind). Yet, to this day, when visiting my childhood home, I, without fail, find one of them creeping over a couch cushion or across my arm.”

So, back to the contest. The top three stories this week were BLOODWORM by Jonathan Fortin, THE PET by Daphne Straset and THE LAUGHING MAN by Naching T Kassa. But I totally already spoiled it by telling you that Naching won. Her story, set in a war zone and crossed with creepy bedtime tale, won her this week’s mini prize which you can also hear on the podcast.

Next week on the #NGHW contest is challenge number 3! Write a 450-500 word, non-fiction, blog post about anything horror. This is to test our fearsome fifteen’s ability to blog which is a super important asset for any writer’s career. This is a very different challenge that may see some different contestants take the limelight. It will be really interesting to see how the contestants handle non-fiction. They will be judged on:
• Blog ability. What will appeal to the readers.
• Topic interest. Is it something horror addicts are interested in today.
• Writing quality.
The winner will have their subject discussed on a prominent horror podcast.
So, who will you follow? Perhaps you will be on #teamjonathan – the gothic, demon lover with a taste for the unique and bizarre – or #teamfeind – Cthulu’s best friend and our favourite metal head – or #teamquentin – our filmmaking fan of Frankenstein’s monster – or #teamriley – the beautiful cosplaying gal who loves herself a little bit of Freddy. Let us know in the comments or on the social media.

Stay spooky!

Hugs xxx

Adelise M Cullens

An Interview With JH Moncrieff

Our Featured author for episode 129 of the horroraddicts.net podcast is JH Moncrieff. JH is a journalist who loves to travel to exotic locations and write horror in her spare time. Recently she talked to us about her work:

What is your story for episode 129 about?

25118244I will be reading an excerpt from The Bear Who Wouldn’t Leave which is the story of Josh, a ten-year-old boy who is struggling to deal with his beloved father’s death while adjusting to life with his new stepfather. While the stepfather tries to portray himself as an all-around good guy, Josh feels he knows Michael’s true nature, and those suspicions are confirmed when Michael gives him a teddy bear–a teddy bear that seems determined to make Josh’s life a living hell…not that anyone believes him!

When did you start writing? 

I wrote my earliest novels when I was five years old. I’d lost all my stencils except two–a bear and a fish–so I created a series of books about a family of fish who live in terror of a bear that stalks them under the ocean. When I was in Grade Four, I had a story about vampires published in the local paper. I’d recently learned the word “devour” so my vampires ran around devouring everyone. It’s a classic.

What are your favorite topics to write about? 

I love to delve into the relationships between people and how the sins of the past can return to haunt us. Interestingly enough, three of the books I’ve written most recently have involved ghosts or hauntings of some form or another.

Who or what inspires you? 27037191

Travel. Travel, travel, travel. It’s where I get all my best ideas, and when I read a book I’ve written while inspired by a particular place, the memory of being there comes right back to me. It’s a great way to relive an amazing trip.

What do you find fascinating about the horror genre?

I’ll start by saying that I really wish people would expand their idea of what horror is. So many people reject it out of hand, claiming they “don’t like horror,” when what they mean is they don’t like torture porn, or they don’t like slasher flicks. But horror is also true crime. It’s the vast majority of our history books and our newspapers. It’s the quiet ghost story, it’s 1984, it’s Gone Girl. What I find fascinating about horror is that there are no guarantees how it will end–a happy ending is not a given. And that it’s so difficult to do well. I’ll go out on a limb and say it’s much easier to make people laugh or cry than it is to truly unsettle or scare them.

Could you tell us about your podcast The Write Cast?

The Write Cast is a podcast for writers by writers. On the first of each month, three very different writers–a romance author, a horror author, and one who writes YA action-adventure–discuss different issues creative types struggle with, including lack of discipline, how to handle rejection, and how to avoid playing the comparison game.

What are some of the books you have available?jhm

I’m a journalist, editor and publicist during most daytime hours, which is my excuse for having so few of my books available right now. The Bear Who Wouldn’t Leave is available as an ebook on pretty much any online retailer, and there’s also an audio version on Amazon.com. If you’d rather have a physical copy, it’s available in the Childhood Fears collection, along with novellas from four other talented writers. I also have a dark psychological suspense that’s free if you sign up for my newsletter.

Where can we find you online?

My website is the best place to start–I blog every Tuesday about all manner of spooky things, from unsolved mysteries to creepy places in the world and the true story behind various horror movies. I’m also on Twitter and have the ubiquitous author page on Facebook.

Once Upon a Scream Author Spotlight: V.E. Battaglia

Horroraddicts.net Publishing has recently published our 4th anthology called Once Upon a Scream. Remember the Fairy tales that you grew up reading? Well they are back again with a horror twist. Once Upon a Scream includes 18 tales that are fantastic and frightful. One of the authors in this anthology is V.E. Battaglia and recently he talked to us about his writing:
What is your story in Once Upon A Scream called and what is it about?

OnceUponAScreamFrontMy story is called “The Boy and his Teeth,” and it’s about a young boy who loses his first tooth and learns about the do’s and don’ts of dealing with the Tooth Fairy.

What inspired the idea?

Basically, I woke up one day and thought to myself, “Is there a proper story about the tooth fairy?” I wish I could say it was more complex than that, but it was a genuine curiosity. Of course, when I say a “proper story,” I mean an old, original Grimm’s Fairy Tale. I grabbed my volume of Grimm’s and read through a bunch of them and I didn’t see a single thing. So, I scratched out the first draft on the spot, which was extremely stylized. It was entirely in the Grimm’s tradition. I later did some editing to make it a bit more modern, but I still have (and really like) that original draft.

When did you start writing?

I started writing (if you could call it that) when I was rather young. My mother worked at a bakery at one point when I was a kid and, depending on her shift and my school schedule, sometimes I would end up spending some time there with her. In their stock room, which smelled mostly of a strange mix of dough and cardboard, they had an old typewriter. It was a little beaten up, but it still worked. I was barely old enough to spell my name, but I used to sit down there and type out “stories” to tell her later.
What are your favorite topics to write about?

I’m not really picky, if I’m being honest. It’s more a matter of what fits in with whatever I have in 27832260mind. Obviously, I’m attracted to dark topics. I’m into monsters and ghosts and aliens and all the things that mash into the category labeled “Horror,” but I especially like if I can somehow tie them together with the psychological aspects of a character. So much of what makes something horrific is within an individual. It’s very personal. I think the writing should reflect that, if at all possible.

What are some of your influences? 

I love Clive Barker. He’s a big personal favorite, primarily because he knows exactly how to walk the line between what is attractive and repulsive. And he doesn’t cheapen it. He shows it to you in all of its glory. He doesn’t look away from the scary parts. That’s a line I stole from Jack Ketchum. Jack Ketchum is another influence. He once described his visceral brand of writing very simply. He said most authors write-up to the point of a terrible thing happening, and then they look away from it and divert you somewhere else while it’s happening. In his case, he just doesn’t look away. It was more eloquently stated by him, of course, but I love that idea. I don’t have the same freedoms as those big names, but whenever possible, I do my best not to look away. And then there’s Thomas Harris. You can sum him up in a single name: Hannibal Lecter. His novels are a master class in character development. Oh, and of course, obligatory Stephen King reference.

What do you find fascinating about the horror genre?

28699646That is such a difficult question. I can babble for days about this and never be done. One thing that I love about horror is that it is so reflective. We always place ourselves in the situation in a horror story. How many times have you heard someone say, “If I was there, I would have moved out of that house. Just move out!” Probably every time there’s a sudden ghost appearance. Or, “Why is she just standing there? I would have been GONE the second that thing showed up.” I’d guess every time the hulking terror descends from the rafters with drool flowing down its many teeth. (Yes, I’m still questioning why Lambert just stands there in Alien. RUN!) I think horror forces its audience into the shoes of the characters more so than any other genre. You’re not just a spectator. You’re there. And that’s because we often see pieces of ourselves in the characters. Everyone, like it or not, has been in a situation that made them a little nervous at some point and chosen to stay. Just like the people in the haunted house. And everyone has frozen at the sight of something terrible and shocking. Just like Lambert. They’re universal experiences. We can all relate. We see shades of ourselves somewhere in the characters. And that’s the scariest part.

What are some of the works you have available?

I have a story called “The Well,” that was published in the Zen of the Dead anthology through Popcorn Press. That released this past Halloween. It’s a fun collection of stories and horror-themed poetry to celebrate the Halloween season. There’s some really cool stuff in there. A bit more recently, Cohesion Press released another anthology in their SNAFU series called SNAFU: Hunters. I have a story in that one called, “Outbreak.” That one is a military-horror anthology and it’s really awesome. I liked every single story in it. It’s a very unique and varied anthology with all manners of ghosts, ghouls and monsters to deal with in all different time frames and settings.

What are you currently working on?

Right now, I’m working on a bunch of projects at once. Without getting into too much detail, I have a story in the works that deals directly with the Halloween season and with its mythos. That one is a lot of work, but its such fun too. I’m also working on another piece that involves a woman who wakes up one day and finds a small hole in her wall that wasn’t there the day before. Maybe she ignores it. Maybe she gets curious and tries to figure out why it’s there. Hard to say. But you know what they say about curiosity and cats, right?

Where can we find you online?

I literally had no social media presence up until very, very recently. I’ve always felt like part of the mystery of a story is also in the mystery of the author. What’s the fun in asking “Who thinks of this stuff?!” when you can literally look up their life story, right? At the same time, if you can’t find me, that’s pretty useless for everyone. So, in light of that, I’ve started up a Twitter page (twitter.com/vebattaglia) and a WordPress (vebattaglia.wordpress.com). Twitter is a bit of a mystery to me. Part of me wants to publish a piecemeal story there. Part of me wonders if it will devolve into me complaining about my pen running out of ink. WordPress is going to feature everything from random updates to little behind the scenes stories about the origins of difference pieces I get published. There might even be one there now… Who knows?

 

An Interview with Mark Taylor

Our featured author for episode 125 of the HorrorAddicts podcast is Mark Taylor. Mark recently answered a few questions for us about his work:

What is your story for episode 125 about?

Crossing Guard CoverThe excerpt comes from ‘Total Entertainment’, a short story from my collection ‘Strange’, published in 2015 by Eleventh Hour Literary Press. It is a dark dystopian telling of a future where employ is everything, and where dreams have become a commodity in the entertainment industry. Dreams are sold as interactive simulations.

The story has been so well received that my publisher has contracted me to turn the short into a novel, which will be coming out later this year, entitled: ‘A Night at the Dream Theater’.

What inspired the idea for using dreams as a virtual reality game in the future?

I was thinking about where the next stages of entertainment were coming from. With virtual reality now becoming a reality (if that makes sense), what next?

My answer was of course something similar, but in a place where every journey, every game, is different. You are experiencing a reality created only by a subconscious. Which of course doesn’t limit the experience to someone’s imagination. A theme explored more in the novel.

When did you start writing?witches tea party_small

I tinkered with writing when I was a teenager. My English teacher seemed to think I had a penchant for it, however, life gets in the way, and I ended up as a guitarist in a metal band. After that it just fell to the wayside. I picked it up again when I was in my thirties, and haven’t looked back since.

What are your favorite topics to write about?

If you’d asked me two years ago I would have said horror, straight up and without a doubt. These days? Well, I suppose I prefer things a little less cut and dry. I like to experiment with genre particularly, and ‘Dream Theater’ not only bends genre, it’s a bit of a brainteaser itself. I think of it as extreme horror with a spoon of hard science fiction, and a drizzle of humor. So I suppose I’m leaning more towards the weird and surreal at the moment.

And skinning people. For some reason a lot of my work has human skinning in it.

Who or what inspires you?

It’s a mixture of things, to be honest. I love reading. I read a lot of indie work, which I feel is important. I also love the masters too. But on top of that I’m a massive film buff, horror in particular. So all of that inspires what I write, but my inspiration to actually get down and get on with it? That would be my wife. She’s my rock.

What do you find fascinating about the horror genre?

Strange CoverIt’s the ability to be able to do whatever I want. Had a bad day at the office? Someone’s getting murdered tonight. It allows me to vent my frustrations as a person as well as my frustrations as a writer. It allows me to delve into the human psyche…and fiddle with it.

And on top of that? I love the reactions from my readers, but not with the gore and splatter stuff, but when I write things that ‘get’ to them.

What are some of the books you have available?

I have a few short story collections, ‘Strange’, as I have already mentioned, but also ‘The Human Condition’, and ‘Small Cuts to the Psyche’. I have a couple of novels, ‘Shutter Speed’, and ‘Redemption’, and two novella series, ‘The Devil’s Hand’, and ‘Witches’.

Where can we find you online?

You can find my website at Mark Taylor Official, my blog where I ramble and review atMark Taylor’s Blog, and on social media on Facebook at Mark Taylor Facebook, or twitter atMark Taylor Twitter.

An interview with Chantal Noordeloos

Our featured author for episode 120 of the Horror Addicts podcast is Chantal Noordeloos. Chantal is a member of the Horror Writers Association and one of her hobbies is board games which you can read about here. Recently Chantal answerd a few questions about her writing:

When did you start writing?

deeplytwistedThat’s one of those ‘tricksy hobbitses’ questions. I can’t tell you when exactly I started. I’ve been making up stories since I was a kid, and even wrote some of them down when I was six or seven (much to the frustration of my mother, who was trying to get me to keep a journal of our holidays) I was also partial to essay writing at school, but I remember in my teens that I thought writing was a bother. I didn’t realize I wanted to be a writer until I turned fifteen, and my English teacher, Bob Harrison, made us do a lot of creative writing. That’s when I knew that this was my passion above all others.

Now, had you asked me “When did you start getting your work published?” I would have had a more straight forward answer *cheeky grin*. My first short story was published in 2012 (unless you count the stories I used to write for my school newspaper) My first novella came out in 2013, and my first novel in 2014.

 

What do you like to write about?

I like to write about ALL THE THINGS *insert little comic meme here* Sorry, I couldn’t control myself there for a second. Ehm… I’m a genre floozy (I don’t just write one genre) and a slipstream Sally (I mix genres) to boot, so I could go in very many directions with this question. I do have some preferences, I guess. I am a big fan of ‘epic stories’. I like to write about angels and demons and the apocalypse. Go big or go home… (not really because I enjoy small stories too, it just felt appropriate to randomly write that) Most of the time I incorporate some sort of mythology or fairytale into my work. Sometimes it’s obvious, sometimes it’s very subtle. That’s just a little thing I do.

In truth, it sometimes feels like the story finds me, rather than me finding the story. Sometimes a thought just hits 23456349me out of the blue, and if it clicks… it’ll become a novel. For me it’s important that I have some sort of connection with my characters. If that works, I enjoy writing.

 

Who are some of your influences?

My main influences are the brothers Grimm, Hans Christiaan Andersen, and all those people who have written down old myths. That’s where my passion started. More contemporary influences are Neil Gaiman, Terry Pratchett and Joss Whedon, though I am more influenced by my environment than I am by other writers. I think writers are more of a stimulant to each other, than they are an influence. I could never write like any of my heroes, their voices are their own… as is mine.

 

What do you find fascinating about the horror genre?

Horror has a macabre beauty to it. Death is the biggest mystery of them all, because no-one ever lived to tell the tale *grin*. There’s something elegant about horror, even about the gory part of it (though I believe horror is so much more than just gore). To me, as a writer, it’s a challenge to find out what frightens people. There’s something very intriguing about fear. There are also a lot of taboos in the world that are broken by the horror genre, which in a way feels very liberating.

 

What will you be reading for episode 120 of the podcast?

I’m going to read a story called ‘Little Death’. It’s a story I wrote after I saw a real item on the news about a mysterious illness.

 

Where can you we find you online?

*whispers* I’m everywhere…

*serious face* I’m really not, though I do spend a lot of time on facebook, and I’m trying to figure out how to do this twitter thing (does that make me a twit?). So you can find me: https://www.facebook.com/ChantalNoordeloosStoryteller

Or on twitter: https://twitter.com/C_Noordeloos

My website can be found here: www.chantalnoordeloos.info

And of course my favorite hang out is here: http://amzn.to/1NLVtZt

 

Thanks for having me on your show! It’s been a hoot!

 

An Interview with Mercedes Yardley

Mercedes M. Yardley is our featured author for episode 118 of the Horror Addicts podcast. Mercedes has written several essays, short stories, poems and novels. She said her writing specializes in the dark and beautiful. Recently Mercedes answered a few questions about her writing for us:

When did you start writing?

Beautiful_Sorrows_-_Mercedes_M._YardleyMMY: I’ve always been writing. I was writing and reading stories aloud to my classmates when I was about eight years old. That’s when I decided I wanted to be a writer. I loved telling stories. I especially loved telling ghost stories and seeing the other children’s eyes widen. There’s something so elegant about darkness.

What do you like to write about?

MMY: I’m a bit schizophrenic in my subject matter and style. I use writing as a way to process, and sometimes I really don’t know how I feel about something until I’ve written about it. Some of my themes include monsters who love and broken people who have shine. Flowers, stars, and water turn up quite a bit. I write about pretty, deadly things.

Who are some of your influences?

MMY: I was heavily influenced by Erma Bombeck and Elizabeth Berg. Erma Bombeck because she was funny and wrote about everyday things. I loved that she made these common experiences fascinating and meaningful. Elizabeth Berg wrote a book called “Pull of the Moon” that had such a feminine style. It was full of mystery and unabashedly womanly. Up until that point, most women I read sounded stereotypically male, so Berg’s work impacted me.

 What do you find fascinating about the horror genre?

MMY: I adore the emotion of it. I love that the horror genre can pull fears and thoughts and sorrowspldg out of readers. It’s a safe place to let those anxieties run free and hopefully get them out of the reader’s mind and soul. I think it’s healthy. I also think there’s something that bonds horror lovers together. We just shared this amazing experience that made you feel things. There’s something so personal about that. Being afraid? Catching your breath? That’s what being alive feels like.

What are some of the books you have out?

MMY: My first book was a collection of short stories called Beautiful Sorrows. It’s 27 different tales ranging from sweet to quite dark. I’m also in an anthology called Grimm Mistresses with my darkest work in there, called “Little Dead Red.”  I have a novella called Apocalyptic Montessa and Nuclear Lulu: A Tale of Atomic Love, a novel called Nameless (Book 1 of the Bone Angel Trilogy), and Pretty Little Dead Girls: A Novel of Murder and Whimsy. It’s my favorite thing I ever wrote. Unfortunately, Apocalyptic Montessa, Nameless, and Pretty Little Dead Girls are temporarily out of print since the grimmbeginning of July. I split with the publishers, which was a very tough decision. But another publishing house seems interested in acquiring and releasing all three, so they’ll be out again very soon. Meanwhile, all three books are available as audiobooks on Audible, if somebody would like to experience them aurally. The narrators did a wonderful job.

 Publishing is a tricky business and things like this happen. I think the important part is to be happy and keep writing. Writing is one of my biggest sources of joy, and if it isn’t working with one place, it’s time to come at it from a different angle. If I lose the passion to write, then something is drastically wrong and it’s time for change.

What will you be reading for episode 118 of the Horror Addicts podcast?

MMY: I’m so excited for this reading! This is an excerpt from Pretty Little Dead Girls: A Novel of Murder and Whimsy. The setup is that Bryony, the girl, is destined to be murdered, and since Peter, the runner, is a serial killer, he’s delighted to help her out. But then somebody else trespasses on his territory. The scene starts with Peter hiding in the blackberry bushes while Bryony jogs down a popular running trail. Then she begins to scream.

 Where can you we find you online?

MMY: I’m all over the place online! You can find me on my blog at www.abrokenlaptop.com. I’m also on Twitter as @mercedesmy, and Facebook under Mercedes M. Yardley. Please stop by and say hi! I’d love that. Thank you so much for the interview! It was great fun.

HorrorAddicts.net 112, Horror Addicts Guide to Life

ha-tagHorror Addicts Episode# 112

Horror Hostess: Emerian Rich

Intro Music by: Valentine Wolfe

writer’s workshop winner | lacuna coil | frankenstein: the true story

Find all articles and interviews at: http://www.horroraddicts.net

 

201 days till halloween

malcolm stewart, jesse orr, kathy bates, misery, stephen king, american horror story, hotel,  addict on the street, the walking dead, talking dead, salem, izombie, dan shaurette, lady gaga, poltergeist, jurassic world, mad max, fury road, unfriended, kbatz, kristin battestella, frankenstein: the true story, horror addicts guide to life, baycon, once upon a scream, laurel anne hill, j malcolm stewart, sumiko saulson, heather roulo, david watson, the undying, ethan reid, zombie, plague, top five, mimielle, makeup, vids, dj pitsiladis, nightmare fuel, werewolves, wisconsin, morbid meals, dan shaurette, berry fool, april fools, free fiction friday, emerian rich, dark soul, dawn wood, music corner, lacuna coil, swamped, jesse orr, grant me serenity, black jack, dead mail, nadine, writing, james, how to get on the show, sandra, zombie movies, scared of the dark, marc vale, advice, horror writer, inspiration, murderer, victim, jesse orr, genesis

 

 

FinalFrontCoverHorror Addicts Guide to Life now available on Amazon!
http://www.amazon.com/Horror-Addicts-Guide-Life-Emerian/dp/1508772525/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1428730091&sr=8-1&keywords=horror+addicts+guide+to+life

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h o s t e s s

Emerian Rich

s t a f f

David Watson, Dan Shaurette, Marc Vale, KBatz (Kristin Battestella), Mimielle, Dawn Wood, Lillian Csernica, Killion Slade, D.J. Pitsiladis, Jesse Orr.

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