10iversary Chilling Chat with J. Malcolm Stewart

10IVERSARY

Jason Malcolm Stewart is an author, journalist and media professional who lives in the San Francisco Bay Area. His short fiction has appeared in the Pulp Empire Series, Heroes of Mars, Twisted Tales, Temptation Magazine, the Once Upon a Scream Anthology, the Killens Review of Art and Letters as well as on the Smoke and Mirrors podcast. His non-fiction Quicklets on a variety of topics can be found at Hyperink.com. He also hosts the YouTube features SEVEN MINUTE TAKES and ACTIVE VOICES.

His novel-length thriller The Eyes of the Stars can be found at Double-Dragon-ebooks.com in both ebook and paperback. His short story collections “Exodus From Mars” and “The Last Words of Robert Johnson” are available now on Amazon along with his non-fiction collection of horror film essays, Look Back in Horror. Jason is no stranger to HorrorAddicts.net. He has been on the show, kidnapped the blog, appeared at conventions, and contributed to Black History Month.

1.)    How old were you when you first became interested in horror?

I’m not sure I can put a firm date to my intro to horror. Around age six or seven I remember getting the beans scared out of me by a film called Equinox, the experience of which was terrifying and fascinating at the same time. I think it was that film that turned on the horror light in my brain.

2.)    What is your favorite kind of horror? (i.e. Classic, Splatterpunk, Slasher, Gothic, etc.)

I’m a fan of the classics, having been raised up on the Golden Age Universal films. But I also came of age during the 80’s Slasher film revolution, so I confess a fondness for that sub-genre as well. Hard to come by a decent Slasher flick in the 21st Century however, so Boris, Bela and the rest of the gang win by default.

3.)    What is your favorite horror novel?

I swear by ‘Salem’s Lot, which to this day, I insist is Stephen King’s best novel in terms of pacing and word choice. The first full-length novel I ever read in a single sitting on a memorable summer day and night in 1981.

4.)    What is your favorite horror TV show?

Errr, tough question. I was a big fan of the 80’s revival version of Dark Shadows as a kid. But, if push comes to shove as an adult, I’ll take the first season of Ash v. Evil Dead as the best horror TV show of the last 35 years.

5.)    What is your favorite horror movie?

Ick! Another toughie… As a kid, nothing was scarier than The Exorcist. I’ll always make time to watch that film when it comes on in revivals. I’m a stupid, wild fanboy for GDT’s Chronos, which is probably Del Toro’s least favorite film, but one I adore.

6.)    How did you first become involved with HorrorAddicts.net?

Met Emerian Rich at a convention and was blessed to find a tribe of kindred souls.

7.)    What is your most favorite memory of the HorrorAddicts.net Blog? (i.e. favorite blog post written by you or someone else, favorite funny memory, etc.)

My funniest memory about the blog was when a number of authors ended up doing short audio promos between the features. I did mine about fifteen times before sending it in because I never like my recorded voice. When it ran, I still didn’t like my voice, but it was hysterical to hear as I knew how much effort had gone into me saying “You’re Listening to HorrorAddicts.net. Stay Spooky!” You would have thought I was trying to do Hamlet.

8.)    What is your favorite part of the blog? (i.e. Book Reviews, Movie Reviews, Interviews, Game Reviews, Free Fiction, Crafting, etc.)

Always been a big fan of the music selections and the spotlight shown on independent and local bands.

9.)    Why is this part your favorite?

Always some gems to be found!

10.)  What would you like to see on the HorrorAddicts.net Blog in the future?

More authors and more short fiction readings!

 

Cheap Reads

23200641The first book I want to talk about is Look Back in Horror: A Personal History of Horror Film by Jason Malcolm Stewart. This is an intimate look at the impact of the genre’s films in the life of suspense author, J. Malcolm Stewart. Part memoir, part retrospective and part love-letter, Look Back in Horror celebrates the films, actors and directors that made horror history. From the Golden Age of Hollywood, to the Hammer Films Revival of the 60’s to the New-School Horror movies of today, Look Back in Horror relives the cinema moments that shaped our lives and warped our brains.

21821706Next up is Axes Of Evil:The Heavy Metal Anthology. This is an original anthology of heavy metal-themed horror stories, edited by music journalist (Metal Hammer) and author Alex S. Johnson.  Carnage. Blood. Damage. Diatonic scales. Bone shards. Blast beats. Chaos. Chromatics. Gore. Guitars. Diabolism. Double bass. Riffs. Wreckage. Monsters. Music. AXES OF EVIL An original anthology of heavy metal-themed horror stories, edited by music journalist (Metal Hammer) and author Alex S. Johnson Featuring Lucy Taylor, Bram Stoker Award-winning author for The Safety of Unknown Cities Sephera Giron, author of over 15 published books, including The House of Pain and Borrowed Flesh Terry M. West, author of What Price Gory, director of the cult classic horror film Flesh for the Beast Del James, author of The Language of Fear, music journalist, songwriter (Guns N’ Roses, Testament, etc.) And 30 more of the finest writers in the horror field today. I have determined that this astounding collection of horror is not merely an anthology but a coded Grimoire of magic. -Robin Dover As a reader and avid horror fanatic, I often find myself saturated with supposedly great horror fiction only to be let down by the quality. With this anthology, I got everything I could possibly want; Horror and Metal. Thirty-four stories with bite and balls make this a must read. Axes of Evil isn’t just a book; it’s an epic tome of brutality.-Dale Herring LET THE SHREDDING BEGIN”

18240919The last book I want to mention is another anthology called Eulogies 2: Tales From The Cellar .Shakespeare said, “All the world’s a stage, and all the men and women merely players.” The contributors to Eulogies II seem to be saying, “All the world’s a cellar, and one only need pull open the bulkhead doors to catch a whiff of the stench, or to walk down the damp, crumbling concrete steps to brave an encounter with what creeps, crawls, or festers in the darkness.” In most cultures, hell is known as a place underneath, down below, in the dark where it is either unbearably hot or unbearably cold, where terrible circumstances overwhelm or even destroy those who wander there. Hell is the ultimate cellar. So it’s no wonder the idea of going down stirs up such a sense of dread. And our life experience is filled with cellars. Cellars of place. Cellars of time. Cellars of circumstance. They can all hold dark, horrifying, and unseemly secrets. From the Introduction by Elizabeth Massie