Once Upon a Scream Special Edition Pack

HorrorAddicts.net Press is proud to announce that we have special edition favor packs for our 4th anthology entitled Once Upon a Scream. This book is edited by Dan Shaurette and it takes the classic fairy tales that you grew up with and gives them a horror twist.

ORDER NOW and get:

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18-PIECE FAVOR PACK
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  • Once Upon a Scream book

  • 18-piece special edition favor pack!

  • Signatures of the authors inside including: Emerian Rich, Dan Shaurette, Laurel Anne Hill, J. Malcolm Stewart, and Shannon Lawrence

While supplies last!

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$15.00 USD gets you the book, favor pack, and includes shipping and handling inside the continental US.
For foreign orders, please email for shipping costs.

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OnceUponAScreamFront Once Upon a Scream

…there was a tradition of telling tales with elements of the fantastic along with the frightful. Adults and children alike took heed not to go into the deep, dark woods, treat a stranger poorly, or make a deal with someone-or something-without regard for the consequences. Be careful of what you wish for, you just might get it.

From wish-granting trolls, to plague curses, and evil enchantresses, these tales will have you hiding under the covers in hopes they don’t find you. So lock your doors, shutter your windows, and get ready to SCREAM.

A return to darker foreboding fairy tales not for children.
Not everyone lives happily ever after.

 

HorrorAddicts.net Press

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An Interview With J. Malcolm Stewart

Our featured author for Episode 127 of the Horror Addicts Podcast is J. Malcolm Stewart no stranger to HorrorAddicts.net. We have reviewed his books The Eyes Of The Stars and Look Back In Horror: A Personal History of Horror Film. He has also had stories in The Horror addicts Guide To Life and Once Upon a Scream Recently we asked J. Malcolm Stewart to tell us more about his writing:

13798345What will you be reading for episode 127 of the podcast?

I will be reading from my novel The Eyes of the Stars.

What is your story in Once Upon A Scream called and what is it about?

The name of my story is “Mr. Shingles” and it concerns some Bay Area boys who go searching for a wish granting troll under the Carquinez Bridge in order to solve a life or death problem. Of course, given the way this anthology works, this little meeting of the minds goes horribly wrong.

What inspired the idea?

Actually, given the fragmented way my mind works, I had been wanting to write a horrific tribute to Dr. Seuss. Thanks to the editors, I was able to live the dream.

When did you start writing?

Some might say I am still not started yet… But those buttheads aside, I started writing down stories and ideas sometime in elementary school. I also spent my youth reading anything I could get my hands on and watching the worst kind of horror, monster and exploitation movies I could. This life of mind crime lead me to where I am today.

What are your favorite topics to write about?

Folklore, mythology, religion and fantasy are my bread and butter. But I’ve tried writing almost every type of genre except for a straight romance ( at least, not it yet…)

What are some of your influences?23200641

King, Straub, Barker and Lovecraft on the horror side. Tony Morrison and Don Delillo on the legit side (though I have no delusions that I do anything like them, other than speaking English). A score of horror comic book writers of ages past like Moore, Wein, Wolfman, Goodman, Starlin and DeMatteis. If you have written a low-budget horror movie in the last 90 years or so, you have a special place in my heart.

What do you find fascinating about the horror genre?

Horror fiction deals with people as they are rather than how we aspire for them to be. Every other form of genre fiction requires a hero. Horror is not caught in that convention, so you can work outside of the box.

What are some of the works you have available?

My novel-length thriller “The Eyes of the Stars” can be found at Double-Dragon-ebooks.com in both e-book and paperback. My short story collections “Exodus From Mars” and “The Last Words of Robert Johnson” are available now on Amazon.com along with my non-fiction collection of horror film essays , “Look Back in Horror: A Personal History of Horror Film”

What are you currently working on?

I’ve just finished two short story pieces, one for another anthology and one for general submission. I also have an insane dream to finish my next novel, a prequel to “The Eyes of the Stars” and my follow-up to “Look Back in Horror” before 2017.

Where can we find you online?

https://about.me/jaymal is my webpage, Sabbx’s Retro Reviews is my blogsite, my twitter is @sabbathsoldier, my YouTube feature where I review indie films is SEVEN MINUTE TAKES, I have a Facebook page, an Amazon author page… Uhhh, that’s probably everything other than my home phone number.

Once Upon a Scream Author Spotlight: Chantal Boudreau

Horroraddicts.net publishing has recently published our 4th anthology called Once Upon a ScreamRemember the Fairy tales that you grew up reading? Well they are back again with a horror twist. Once Upon a Scream includes 18 tales that are fantastic and frightful. One of the authors in this anthology is Chantal Boudreau and recently talked to us about her writing:

What is your story in Once Upon A Scream called and what is it about?

OnceUponAScreamFrontMy story is called “Without Family Ties” and it’s about a man who sees his family line coming to end, so he uses ritual magic to try to preserve it, with unpleasant consequences.

What inspired the idea?

I wanted to write something with a theme similar to Pinocchio, yet having a sinister, modern flavour. I decided to research ritual dolls and fertility magic, and the results inspired my story.

When did you start writing?

I’ve been writing since I could read. I won prizes for my stories in junior high and high school, so I kept at, but I’ve only been working to get published for the last six years.

What are your favorite topics to write about?

I’m a speculative fiction writer at heart, and I lean towards the dark and edgy. I enjoy multi-layered flawed characters and reluctant heroes – someone to whom the reader might be able to relate

What are some of your influences?

One of my bigger influences was Tanith Lee. I loved her Red as Blood story collection, which had10792270 horror and dark fantasy fairy tale mash-ups. I’m also a fan of a variety of mythological and traditional tales. They are the foundation of today’s speculative fiction.

What do you find fascinating about the horror genre?

Horror is cathartic. It generates negative emotion – fear, anger, sadness, disgust – but when you’re done reading, you get to leave all that behind. You get the relief of knowing none of it was real and you can look at reality in a more positive light.

What are some of the works you have available?

I’ve published several dozen works, including novels, most of which are now out of print. But there are still quite a few anthologies out there with my stories in them, like the Deathlehem trilogy, Dead North and other zombie anthologies, and My Favorite Apocalypse. There are even some non-fiction collections containing articles by me, such as Horror Addicts Guide to Life.

13371591What are you currently working on?

I’ve been working mostly on short fiction lately.  My current work-in-progress is a horror tale called The Reluctant Collector about a debt collector who hates his job to begin with and then ends up cursed to despise it, and one of his co-workers in particular, even more.  It drives him past the breaking point, and chaos ensues.

Where can we find you online?

Links:

Website: Website

Facebook: Facebook

Amazon Author Page: Amazon Author Page

Twitter: Twitter

Scribd.com: Scribd.com

Goodreads Author Page: Goodreads

Once Upon a Scream Author Spotlight: V.E. Battaglia

Horroraddicts.net Publishing has recently published our 4th anthology called Once Upon a Scream. Remember the Fairy tales that you grew up reading? Well they are back again with a horror twist. Once Upon a Scream includes 18 tales that are fantastic and frightful. One of the authors in this anthology is V.E. Battaglia and recently he talked to us about his writing:
What is your story in Once Upon A Scream called and what is it about?

OnceUponAScreamFrontMy story is called “The Boy and his Teeth,” and it’s about a young boy who loses his first tooth and learns about the do’s and don’ts of dealing with the Tooth Fairy.

What inspired the idea?

Basically, I woke up one day and thought to myself, “Is there a proper story about the tooth fairy?” I wish I could say it was more complex than that, but it was a genuine curiosity. Of course, when I say a “proper story,” I mean an old, original Grimm’s Fairy Tale. I grabbed my volume of Grimm’s and read through a bunch of them and I didn’t see a single thing. So, I scratched out the first draft on the spot, which was extremely stylized. It was entirely in the Grimm’s tradition. I later did some editing to make it a bit more modern, but I still have (and really like) that original draft.

When did you start writing?

I started writing (if you could call it that) when I was rather young. My mother worked at a bakery at one point when I was a kid and, depending on her shift and my school schedule, sometimes I would end up spending some time there with her. In their stock room, which smelled mostly of a strange mix of dough and cardboard, they had an old typewriter. It was a little beaten up, but it still worked. I was barely old enough to spell my name, but I used to sit down there and type out “stories” to tell her later.
What are your favorite topics to write about?

I’m not really picky, if I’m being honest. It’s more a matter of what fits in with whatever I have in 27832260mind. Obviously, I’m attracted to dark topics. I’m into monsters and ghosts and aliens and all the things that mash into the category labeled “Horror,” but I especially like if I can somehow tie them together with the psychological aspects of a character. So much of what makes something horrific is within an individual. It’s very personal. I think the writing should reflect that, if at all possible.

What are some of your influences? 

I love Clive Barker. He’s a big personal favorite, primarily because he knows exactly how to walk the line between what is attractive and repulsive. And he doesn’t cheapen it. He shows it to you in all of its glory. He doesn’t look away from the scary parts. That’s a line I stole from Jack Ketchum. Jack Ketchum is another influence. He once described his visceral brand of writing very simply. He said most authors write-up to the point of a terrible thing happening, and then they look away from it and divert you somewhere else while it’s happening. In his case, he just doesn’t look away. It was more eloquently stated by him, of course, but I love that idea. I don’t have the same freedoms as those big names, but whenever possible, I do my best not to look away. And then there’s Thomas Harris. You can sum him up in a single name: Hannibal Lecter. His novels are a master class in character development. Oh, and of course, obligatory Stephen King reference.

What do you find fascinating about the horror genre?

28699646That is such a difficult question. I can babble for days about this and never be done. One thing that I love about horror is that it is so reflective. We always place ourselves in the situation in a horror story. How many times have you heard someone say, “If I was there, I would have moved out of that house. Just move out!” Probably every time there’s a sudden ghost appearance. Or, “Why is she just standing there? I would have been GONE the second that thing showed up.” I’d guess every time the hulking terror descends from the rafters with drool flowing down its many teeth. (Yes, I’m still questioning why Lambert just stands there in Alien. RUN!) I think horror forces its audience into the shoes of the characters more so than any other genre. You’re not just a spectator. You’re there. And that’s because we often see pieces of ourselves in the characters. Everyone, like it or not, has been in a situation that made them a little nervous at some point and chosen to stay. Just like the people in the haunted house. And everyone has frozen at the sight of something terrible and shocking. Just like Lambert. They’re universal experiences. We can all relate. We see shades of ourselves somewhere in the characters. And that’s the scariest part.

What are some of the works you have available?

I have a story called “The Well,” that was published in the Zen of the Dead anthology through Popcorn Press. That released this past Halloween. It’s a fun collection of stories and horror-themed poetry to celebrate the Halloween season. There’s some really cool stuff in there. A bit more recently, Cohesion Press released another anthology in their SNAFU series called SNAFU: Hunters. I have a story in that one called, “Outbreak.” That one is a military-horror anthology and it’s really awesome. I liked every single story in it. It’s a very unique and varied anthology with all manners of ghosts, ghouls and monsters to deal with in all different time frames and settings.

What are you currently working on?

Right now, I’m working on a bunch of projects at once. Without getting into too much detail, I have a story in the works that deals directly with the Halloween season and with its mythos. That one is a lot of work, but its such fun too. I’m also working on another piece that involves a woman who wakes up one day and finds a small hole in her wall that wasn’t there the day before. Maybe she ignores it. Maybe she gets curious and tries to figure out why it’s there. Hard to say. But you know what they say about curiosity and cats, right?

Where can we find you online?

I literally had no social media presence up until very, very recently. I’ve always felt like part of the mystery of a story is also in the mystery of the author. What’s the fun in asking “Who thinks of this stuff?!” when you can literally look up their life story, right? At the same time, if you can’t find me, that’s pretty useless for everyone. So, in light of that, I’ve started up a Twitter page (twitter.com/vebattaglia) and a WordPress (vebattaglia.wordpress.com). Twitter is a bit of a mystery to me. Part of me wants to publish a piecemeal story there. Part of me wonders if it will devolve into me complaining about my pen running out of ink. WordPress is going to feature everything from random updates to little behind the scenes stories about the origins of difference pieces I get published. There might even be one there now… Who knows?

 

Once Upon a Scream Author Spotlight: Nickie Jamison

Horroraddicts.net Publishing has recently published our 4th anthology called Once Upon a Scream. Remember the Fairy tales that you grew up reading? Well, they are back again with a horror twist. Once Upon a Scream includes 18 tales that are fantastic and frightful. One of the authors in this anthology is Nickie Jamison and recently she talked to us about her writing:

What is your story in Once Upon A Scream called and what is it about?

OnceUponAScreamFrontMelody of Bones is a mashup of the Grimm’s tales The Singing Bone and The Pied Piper of Hameln – stories of love, music, and betrayal.

What inspired the idea? 

My inspiration came from music. The idea came to me during a Valentine Wolfe concert at ConCarolinas. The band was promoting their newest album and the song Twisted Melody resonated with me and became my twisted fairy tale.

When did you start writing?

I don’t remember a time in my life that I was never making up and telling stories. My Barbies and other toys all had complicated and amazing backstories. The first story that I put to pen and paper was during 5th grade. It was a horror story that got me into trouble…apparently you’re not supposed to write about blood, guts, gore, dismemberment, and other gross things when you are a student at a private Conservative Christian Academy. Who knew? *shrug*

What are your favorite topics to write about?

I don’t think that I have a favored topic, I tend to write whatever madness is going through my mind at the present moment.

What are some of your influences?

I saw an R.L. Stine Fear Street novel in the Dollar Tree the other day and almost cried. Stine, 26607074Christopher Pike, Ann M. Martin, and I can name author’s ad nauseum, but my greatest influence is my dad. No one told him you aren’t supposed to read the works of Edgar Allan Poe, Edgar Rice Burroughs, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, F. Scott FitzGerald, J.R.R. Tolkien, Ernest Hemingway, H.G. Wells, and Stephen King or Stephen Hawking to your kid as a bedtime story. I think I just broke my ad nauseum rule…oops.

What do you find fascinating about the horror genre?

I’m fascinated by the types of fear that can be explored. You’ve got your good ol’ jump scare, but you can also play with the deep rooted fears and phobias.

What are some of the works you have available?

Most of my published works are in the Romance/ Erotica genre. You can find me on Amazon
What are you currently working on?
I’m working on my first full-length novel, another fairytale, but modern and less gore.

Where can we find you online?

Once Upon a Scream Author Spotlight: Laurel Anne Hill

Horroraddicts.net publishing has recently published our 4th anthology called Once Upon a ScreamRemember the Fairy tales that you grew up reading? Well, they are back again with a horror twist. Once Upon a Scream includes 18 tales that are fantastic and frightful. One of the authors in this anthology is Laurel Anne Hill and recently talked to us about her writing:

What is your story in Once Upon A Scream called and what is it about?
OnceUponAScreamFrontMy short story is “Commanding the Stones,” about Yana, a middle-aged Russian-American woman on a business trip to Paris with her husband in 1995. In “Commanding the Stones,” a murder, Yana’s troubled marriage, her mysterious benefactor, and a Russian fairy tale—a twisted variant of “The Stone Flower”—add up to terror and redemption in the sewers of Paris.

What inspired the idea?

My love of Russian fairy tales and painted lacquer boxes sparked the initial inspiration. Then I visited Paris during the month of November in 1999. Through the rain and chill, a story line emerged.

When did you start writing?

I started writing before I could read. I created stories and my older sister wrote them down. I illustrated them with pictures from comic books and magazines. My first short story was published—in the kids’ section of a major San Francisco newspaper—when I was eleven. The piece was absolutely terrible, but I had no clue. The San Francisco News paid me $2, enough for eight double-feature movies way back then.

What are your favorite topics to write about?2969162

Many of the stories I craft have inspirational premises. Worthiness is rewarded. The power of love, honor, faith and duty can surmount daunting obstacles and transform lives. But I also like to write about the jolting “rewards” unworthiness can bring, and the sometimes blurred line between virtue and vice. Whatever I write, I love using my imagination.

What are some of your influences?

Without a doubt, atmosphere and music influence the direction of many of my stories. Between 1999 and 2005, for example, I made three trips to Paris—all during the November time frame. When first working on “Commanding the Stones,” I took the Paris sewer tour. The unpleasant taste of the air near an underground sewer drain let me picture ominous things happening to my protagonist. My mind processed the many details of the scene. Back home in California, I listened to Russian Orthodox chants to set my mood, allowing ancient magic and mysteries to merge with modern times as I worked.

Laurel by the Seine River 2002What do you find fascinating about the horror genre?

The physiological reaction a scary movie produces in me. The increase in my heart rate and breathing. The tensing of my muscles. It’s like I’m the one in danger. I’ve had a half-dozen or so close brushes with death—experiences that had nothing to do with movies. During those times, survival—and the various chemicals released into my bloodstream to secure it—exhilarated me. Not so with movies. When an empathetic character on the screen escapes death, I feel more exhaustion than elation. When I read horror, however, my brain does a better job of moderating the intensity of my physical reaction. Maybe that’s why I prefer scary books to scary movies in recent years, although I do adore both.paris sewer sandstone wall cropped

What are some of the works you have available?

My award-winning novel, HEROES ARISE, and many of my thirty published short stories are available through Amazon. To listen to my stories I’ve recorded (including award-winning “Flight of Destiny” and “The Grave of Mario Bandini”) go here. For my darker short stories in print, read “Wings of Revenge” (in The Wickeds), “Till Death Do Us Part” (in Horrible Disasters), “The Vengeance Garden” (in Spells and Swashbucklers) and “Fowl Consequences” (in Fault Zone: Diverge).

What are you currently working on?

My novel, The Engine Woman’s Light (a spirits-meet-steampunk, weird west tale) was accepted for Paris sewer tunnel croppedpublication by Sand Hill Review Press last month. I anticipate it will be available in 2017. I’m preparing to serve as editor for the next Fault Zone Anthology. That, too, will release in 2017. Also, I’ve started working on a short story for Horror Addicts’ next anthology. For long-term projects, I’ll either return to a novel-in-progress (magical realism) set in Mexican California, or start a new one based on my recently-published fantasy short story, “Going Revolutionary.”

Where can we find you online?

For my website, go here. My Amazon.

For Facebook here.

 

Once Upon a Scream Author Spotlight: Sara Lundberg

Horroraddicts.net publishing has recently published our 4th anthology called Once Upon a ScreamRemember the Fairy tales that you grew up reading? Well, they are back again with a horror twist. Once Upon a Scream includes 18 tales that are fantastic and frightful. One of the authors in this anthology is Sara Lundberg and she recently talked to us about her writing:

OnceUponAScreamFrontWhat is your story in Once Upon A Scream called and what is it about?
My story is called “Curse of the Elves.” It’s about Jenna and Frank, a couple who own a butcher shop that’s about to go bankrupt. A single act of kindness leads to them being “blessed” by a mysterious benefactor, where each morning they wake up to a stock of delicious meat pies to sell. Frank is ecstatic, but Jenna is too much of a cynic to trust the miracle and decides to look the metaphorical gift horse in the mouth. What she discovers is horrifying, and the blessing suddenly seems more like a curse. A curse she can’t seem to get rid of.

What inspired the idea?
I write short stories for a website called The Confabulator Café. Every month they have a different writing prompt, and I wrote this for a fairytale retelling prompt. I chose to modernize “Shoemaker and the Elves” and give it a horror twist.

When did you start writing?
I remember writing silly stories with friends all the time as a kid, but I didn’t really take it seriously until my eight grade English teacher told me that he was sure he’d see me in print soon. Unfortunately, it took nearly twenty years for his encouragement to sink in and result in my first short story publication. He passed away a year before that happened, though, so he never did get to see it.16004757

What are your favorite topics to write about?
I like to write about the fantastical (and sometimes horrific) things that I’m sure are (lurking) just around the corner. Does anyone else half-expect to find the TARDIS waiting for them one of these days? I just have to keep looking for the right corner…

What are some of your influences?
I absorbed high fantasy when I was a child—Terry Brooks, J.R.R. Tolkien, Robert Jordan—and as I got older, discovered Michael Crichton, Clive Barker, and Stephen King. Throw in some Joss Whedon, and you end up with my weird mix of fantasy and horror.

What do you find fascinating about the horror genre?
What people are capable of in their very worst moment—good and bad alike. Also, the twist. Whatever I’m reading or watching or playing, I love trying to predict when the twist will come or who the betrayer will be. I’ll be honest, though. Joss Whedon still gets me every time. Every. Time.

27308048What are some of the works you have available?
Just small stuff right now. A piece of horror flash fiction called “Who’s for Dinner” was published in the Shadows of the Mind anthology, and a dark fantasy piece titled “The Heart of Stone Monsters” was included in the recent Misunderstood anthology. I also have several short stories I’m very proud of at the Confabulator Café, but I’m hoping to get a novel out before too long.

What are you currently working on?
I’m writing an urban fantasy trilogy right now. Working to get the first book out into the world while I write book two. And still trying to write a short story every month for the Café. Keeps me in shape.

Where can we find you online?
I live at a few places across the internet. I have a Facebook author page where I announce stuff like publications and Café stories, a Twitter that I mostly use during National Novel Writing Month, and a writing blog where I try to keep myself accountable on this crazy writing journey (and sometimes post pictures of my puppy).