Review : HorrorAddicts Horror Bites: Alice’s Scars by Adam Bealby

Review: HorrorAddicts Horror Bites: Alice’s Scars by Adam Bealby

 

As the editor of this HorrorBites Story, I had the opportunity to not only read it early but often. What a story to choose to read multiple times. I remember where I was when I found out what happened to Alice, and you will too. This story is a great one to be told. It is told as if Adam is recounting a memory of  Alice he once knew. He was able to give us a short, small glimpse of what bipolar disorder does to the one with it and those that love them.

I have noticed recently several horror writers have been writing stories of mental illness from depression to bipolar. Sometimes, mental illness is more horrific than any fiction writer could ever tell. Lifting the stigma of these illnesses will allow us to advance in not only understanding but possibly curing them. It was hard for “Adam” ( as the narrator) to love Alice, as it is very hard to love someone who is ill and may or may not be getting treatment.

Of course, how he describes the discovery of Alice’s scars and the progression of his understanding Alice was great. There were a couple other scenes in the story that he was great at conveying using the world of Alice and Wonderland to help his characters along their purpose. You definitely feel like you are going through the recounted events and see it in a world familiar with Wonderland.

So, I invite you to get this story and spend a quick break reading it. I promise you won’t return the same.

 

If you have enjoyed this story, please let us know by email: horroraddicts@gmail.com or leave a review on Amazon.

 

Adam L. Bealby writes fantasy, horror and weird fiction for both adults and children. His short stories and comic work have been published in numerous anthologies, including Spooked (Bridge House Publishing), Pagan (Zimbell House Publishing), Darkness Abound (Migla Press), Once Upon a Scream (HorrorAddicts.net), Sirens (World Weaver Press), World Unknown Review Vol. 2, rEvolution (MiFiWriters) and Murky Depths magazine. He lives in Worcestershire, UK with his wife and three children, and a harried imagination. Catch up with his latest ravings at @adamskilad.

 

 

 

 

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Ghastly Games Review – Salem

By: Kenzie Kordic

Salem is a great party game in the same vein as One Night Werewolf or Vampire. I love these types of board/card games because no matter if your friends or family are into horror- they’ll be into these games. Salem is a board game where demons enraptured the minds of the town folk of Salem, making them do things that they don’t necessarily want to do, and it’s your job to stop it from happening. This review will go over the gameplay, pros and cons of buying this game compared to the dozens of others like it, and my opinion of it.

The gameplay of Salem starts out that each player gets assigned a secret role from a list. Some roles are good, others are bad like witches. It is the players of the games responsibility to find all the witches and lynch them in a number of nights. If all the witches are lynched, Salem wins. Wins the witches remain, everyone who is not a witch wins. It is a good game full of lies, deceits, traitors, and murder – my type of game.

The pros and cons of this game kind of go hand in hand. In one hand, you have a great game where you can grab all of your friends for a drunken night of scary fun. The cons are that this game is virtually like the other games of the same category. The only difference is that instead of Werewolves, murderers, and vampires, it’s witches. What the game brings to the table as far as uniqueness is that it is actually full of history and it is fun to do things that actually happened years ago.

My opinion of this game is a positive one – it’s fun for what it is. It isn’t unique, the gameplay is very simple, and I have a stack of five other games just like it in my game room. But, I do like it because I typically enjoy horror games that I can get my friends in on after a few glasses of wine since I’m the only horror buff in my friend group. If you loved One Night Werewolf, then you’ll love this game too. Until next time my gamers, stay scared.

Book Review: Barnabas, Quentin, and the Sea Ghost by Marilyn Ross

Dark Shadows is a classic for Horror Addicts everywhere, so when I saw a row of 1970 paperbacks based on the Dark Shadows theme at a thrift store, I couldn’t pass them up. My only regret is that I didn’t buy all of them.

Barnabas, Quentin, and the Sea Ghost by Marilyn Ross were a combination of everything we love. A vampire, a werewolf, and what seems like a pirate ghost, Jenny Swift.

Nora and her father have come to Collinwood to head a salvage project deep under the sea. They’ve been told of the curses of the Jenny Swift including the death of the wife of the last salvage expert. But those warnings fall on deaf ears as Nora and her father are skeptics. As soon as Nora arrives, she encounters a midnight visitor and then shortly after meets Barnabas Collins who she falls in love with.

Despite the rumors of the curse of the Jenny Swift, the salvage operation goes forward. But when accidents start to arise and Nora finds seaweed in her bed, she thinks there might be something to it. On a scary night in the fog, she sees the apparition of Jenny Swift, the beautiful side of her face calling her to the ship and the horrid, mutilated side of her face scaring Nora to the bone. But when Nora is attacked in the cemetery—only to be saved by Barnabas—the Collinwood family wonders if there’s more going on. Could the mysterious Quentin Collins be the one attacking villagers and Nora? Adding a fortune hunter claiming to have rights to the treasure and you’ve got quite a story.

I really enjoyed the story and the descriptions especially of the cemetery and of the apparition Jenny Swift. Some leniency can be given to the quality of writing because of the time and because of the writing style being very script-like. If you can get your hands on this book, I say buy! And if you see any others, buy them up! Or, call me so I can go get them! For lovers of Dark Shadows, these are must-reads and for us regular Addicts it’s a pretty damn good waste of an evening.

Book Review: It’s a Bad, Bad, Bad, Bad World by Curtis M. Lawson

Review of the Curtis M. Lawson book It’s a Bad, Bad, Bad, Bad World

By Michele Roger

Grinning like a school girl, she said a prayer of thanks to God Almighty and pressed a hand against her ribs. The bones should have been broken. They had been earlier when she lay on the snowy cobblestone in Boston alley. Now there was no pain, and breathing came easily. The blade, which bore the seal of Samael, had performed what it had advertised.”

51ms92t5gxlWhat if eternal youth didn’t come by way of a holy grail, or a fountain? What if it came in the form of a pair of ancient knives? The blades are said to not only take the life of a victim but also transfer the victim’s vitality to their murderer. Such knives are considered the reality behind the mythical powers of Vlad the Impaler and Jack the Ripper, showing up at just the right, or wrong time throughout the world and history, depending on which side of the blade you’re standing.

It’s a Bad, Bad, Bad, Bad World” is one part ancient relic mystery, much like the Dan Brown novels. Characters the reader comes to trust suddenly commit acts of betrayal. Villains, (and there are a whole lot of them in this story) come from every different background, backstory and motive. In the race to possess the two knives known as the Fangs of Wallachia, an assassin nun sent by the Vatican, a ninety year old occultist, two terminal cancer patients, a junkie, a gun for hire, a cop, and a pawn dealer, a misspent teenager, an antiques dealer and an aristocrat are all entangled in a dark web.

A little slow to start, Lawson’s book becomes a page turner. His characters are richly written with a plot that quickens its pace with every chapter. One part gore, one part Indiana Jones, it was a thrill ride I would highly recommend.

Nurse Blood by Rebecca Besser Review

Nurse Blood by Rebecca Besser Review

nurse-blood-front-cover A fast paced read, you found that the characters were built as the plot was being laid out, the description of the characters through their actions were on the nose. Also, there was not a scene that didn’t belong. While the subject and the gore was there, it wasn’t over the top and it was not done in poor taste. I was afraid there might have been a couple of tasteless gore scenes again, not disappointed.

So, Sonya is a nurse and harvests organs to sell on the Blackmarket to make extra money. She has a couple of guys to help her, but she is the main in the catching of the men to lure the men to their deaths. Sonya and her team make these disappearances quick and leave little to no traces. They have been successful, but how long could they continue to get away with this?

One victim she lures is Daniel Mccoy, he just so happens to a twin brother to an FBI agent David, who wants to find the truth behind his brother’s disappearance. While he is looking for clues and trying to find the truth, Sonya is faced with one last big harvest (that involves a family, just a warning). Will she be successful and evade David just long enough to pull off the harvest?

The writing style Besser had was perfect for character building while the plot moves forward. I really enjoy this kind of book, and would recommend this book only to people who enjoy senseless killing, fast action and the main character to be a villain. Find out what happens to Sonya, and if David ever finds out what happened to his twin brother here.

Review – Chameleon by Layden Robinson

Chameleon by Layden Robinson
Edited by: B.Z. Hercules, Jessica Hueras and Layden Robinson
Cover Art by: Daniel Johnson (Squared Motion)

Synopsis: Epic tale of a mysterious man in search of peace, love and eternal answers. An acid trip frenzy that delivers color and intensity the whole way. Think a David Lynch movie meets Stephen King “Wastelands” with a hint of Chuck Palahniuk. Download this massive story. You will not be disappointed.

This short read by Layden Robinson will definitely put color in your vision and perhaps even your dreams if you read it before bedtime. It was a cross between poetry and campfire stories with the Manson Family. Is that a bad thing? I’ll let the reader decide. I wouldn’t say it had a feel of Chuck Palahniuk, but definitely a “Mickey and Mallory” peyote trip under the stars. I found a few instances where the wording was redundant, which disrupted the flow of the story. This book is definitely for readers who love flowing, psychedelic prose while curling up with chill music (for more effect, add incense). The cover work was genius and gives you all the set up you need for what’s inside!

I gave this read 3.5 stars because I felt the editing could’ve been a little tighter and because there were a few spots I hit a bump in the rabbit hole.

David’s Haunted Library: The Human Condition

DavidsHaunted

28368109Terror, murder and madness are all part of the human condition. We try to hide the fact that we have evil thoughts inside us and we don’t speak about the things that scare us the most. Like what bad things a person can do to another or even to themselves in a desperate situation. The Human Condition by Mark Taylor is a collection of 17 stories that have to do with the dark side of life, such as what happens when a person is driven to madness or faced with their worst nightmare.

The first story in this collection and one of my favorites is Christmas At The Mill. The story is about a man named Jimmy who gets trapped in a room at his work over the holidays. He wanted some peace and quiet and got much more than he bargained for. I love the simplicity of this story, it’s just one character and his struggle to escape his situation. I loved how the tension builds in this story and how everything was described. Mark proves here that you don’t need a lot of elements to tell a great story.

Another good one was Bobo. This was about a man named Tim who works as a clown on a famous children’s TV show. Things start to go bad for Tim as he starts having visions of everyone in the studio audience dying. Is Tim going insane or is his subconscious trying to tell him something? Once again I loved the storytelling here, I liked how Tim sees himself as crazy, but as the story moves along you see that’s not the case. I especially liked the ending to this one.

Each story in this book is well written and focuses on characters that are just average people put in gruesome, horrifying situations.  I love character driven fiction so I enjoyed all the stories in this anthology. Mark Taylor made me like every person in this book, which made it that much scarier when they were put in danger. When I finished reading this I wondered if Mark Taylor can make short stories this good, then his novels must be excellent.