Remembering Sid Haig

On September 21, 2019 the horror community, as well as the film industry as a whole lost a legend in Sid Haig. At 80 years old, Sid’s passing was reported via Instagram by his wife, Suzie.

Sid Haig’s career had begun with a multitude of performances starting in 1960 with a short film by Jack Hill, The Host. The duo worked together again when Sid made his first major film debut in 1967 with Spider Baby, aka “The Maddest Story Ever Told”. This was the makings of a long-standing relationship Sid had with Jack Hill, where Sid would go on to explain in an interview that Hill was one of three directors he would never say no to working with. The other two being Rob Zombie and Quinton Tarantino, who collectively Sid had worked on 17 projects with including, but not limited to Jackie Brown, Zombies House of 1000 Corpses trilogy, and 2007’s Halloween. Many of Sid’s roles had begun with numerous TV appearances, but after announcing his retirement in 1992, it wasn’t until 5 years later when Sid would return. In Tarantino’s, Jackie Brown, Sid went on to really expand his big-screen persona, with Captain Spaulding being his most iconic role. Every great performer has that one role that they will always be known for, and Spaulding, with Sid’s demented laugh, antics, and downright savagery has earned his place as one of the most menacing clowns ever put to film, giving Pennywise and the Killer Klowns a run for their money! As if we need another clown to terrorize our nightmares, ha! But we can’t deny our love for Spaulding aka Cutter.

I am grateful to have met Sid at a Rock and Shock horror convention several years ago and I must say, although he is one of the nicest and most appreciative people toward his fans, Sid, to me at least, always had a great commanding presence about him. Either in person or on-screen, even in his most minor roles, you felt his energy whenever he was around! But in person, he was a far cry from the maniacal clown we may all remember him as. A humble, grateful man who went on to attribute Rob Zombie as the one who reignited his interest in acting. It is incredible to observe Sid’s personality change between the interviews he’s conducted and his character portrayals which is only a further testament to his abilities as an actor.

We could spend all day listing off his accolades and accomplishments, but the only real way to appreciate Sid Haig is to experience his performances first hand. I doubt anyone reading this hasn’t seen at least one or two of his films, but for those who haven’t you are sincerely missing out on one of the best and most committed performers ever. From all of us here at HorrorAddicts.net, we thank you Sid for everything you’ve done not just in horror, but for the world of cinema. You will be missed!

This is The Horror Seeker saying, Thank you Sid Haig (1939 – 2019) Rest in Peace, my friend!

Remembering Steve Dash

Sad news has gripped the horror community with the recent passing of Steve Dash. For those who don’t know, Dash passed away on December 18, 2018, at the age of 74 due to complications from diabetes. He was mainly a stuntman/coordinator in the horror genre, in films such as Mr. Hush, Night Shift, and Alone in the Dark. Also, you may not know, he was a stunt double for William Atherton’s character, Walter Peck in 1984’s Ghostbusters! However, those of us familiar to his name will always remember Dash as the burlap butcher– (I coin the phrase if it has yet to be taken), or bag head Jason as he’s been called, the first Jason Voorhees in Friday the 13th part 2.

He set the bar for what was to become a staple character in the oh-so missed Slasher genre. A kind-hearted, and funny man, I had the privilege of meeting Dash in New Jersey at Monster Mania a few years ago. I was taken-a-back being in his presence, as his energy still very much radiated that of Jason Voorhees. Dash, like Kane Hodder, was not shy about letting loose his inner Crystal Lake Killer, having brought up his machete (to my throat) for our photo op.

When I asked Dash why there were two people portraying Jason in the film, seeing as he himself was a stuntman, he replied that while he was originally set to be the stuntman only, the crew was having problems with their other actor Warrington Gillette. While the scene we see at the end of Friday part 2 is, in fact, Gillette, this was filmed before said problems had arisen. Thus, Dash was given the remainder of the film to bring Jason to life. And what a job he did! As far as all of the actors who have come along to play the iconic role, admitting myself that CJ Graham remains to be my personal favorite overall, Dash definitely brought, what I think to be, the most terrifying presence to the character. This perhaps mostly due to the fact that Jason was new to the screen, and had yet to be shaped into what we know of him today. Dash’s portrayal maintained a sense of emotion and grief towards his mothers slaying at the end of the original, something I feel was lost to any of the later actors that followed. With this, as well as being the only rendition (excluding Jason as a boy in Part 1) to not have dawned the infamous hockey mask, I think Dash stands out among the 9 actors who have come to play the role.

On behalf of horror fans all over, we say thank you. Rest in Peace Steve Dash, as you will always be remembered as– in the manner that you had autographed my DVD case– “The Real Jason” I do hope that many of you out there had the opportunity to meet Steve Dash, it was an honor for myself.

Until next time, this is The Horror Seeker!