David’s Haunted Library: The Beauty Of Death

David's Haunted Library

30732852There are a lot of horror anthologies out there and it’s not always easy to find one that you think you would like. That being said sometimes you find a horror anthology that when you see it you know you can’t go wrong. The Beauty Of Death: The Gargantuan Book of Horror Tales is that book. Edited by Alessandro Manzetti, this book includes stories by such great horror authors as Tim Waggoner, John Skipp, Poppy Z Brite, Peter Straub and many more. This is one mammoth collection that all horror fans should have.

One of my favorite stories in this collection is Carly Is Dead by Shane McKenzie. This story is told from the viewpoint of a rotting corpse in a field who is being eaten by the forest animals but is still aware of what’s going on. Who would have thought you could have sympathy for a corpse. Another good hard-core gore story is White Trash Gothic by Edward Lee. This one has to do with an author who gets amnesia due to a traumatic event and he travels to where he wrote his last book to find out what happened. I loved how Mr. Lee makes you feel compassion for the author and then throws him into a bizarre situation that will make you fear going to a small town.

Another one of my favorites was Calcutta, Lord Of Nerves by Poppy Z. Brite. This one is about a boy born in Calcutta, he is moved to America but returns after his father dies and the zombie apocalypse starts. In Calcutta things are so bad it’s hard to tell the poor people from the zombies and weird things happen as we find out that the zombies may be worshiping an old God. My favorite scene in the book is when the lead character excepts that zombies are just part of the world now and he doesn’t think they’re that bad.

It’s really hard to pick favorites in this book and if I wrote about each story here this review would be a book in itself. Other stories that stood out for me were The Office by Kevin Lucia which is a psychological horror story about a  man who relives his life through his favorite place, his office. Another one is No Place Like Home by JG Faherty which follows a man who bought a haunted house that changes his life for the better. Things get bloody though when someone tries to get him to give it up. In The Garden is one by Lisa Morton that really got to me. In this one a woman lives in a house and is taking care of her crippled brother when something in her garden causes him to get better, I loved how Lisa made you feel compassion for the lead character and then hits you with a shock ending.

The Beauty Of Death deserves a spot on every horror fans book shelf. When I first saw it I knew I had to have it and I wasn’t disappointed. This book reminded me of The Year’s Best Horror anthologies that come out each year, but The Beauty Of Death has more to offer. Every story here has the anatomy of a good horror story and focuses on characters dealing with their worst fears and considering its length it will keep you scared and reading for a long time.




HorrorAddicts.net 101, Ann Wilkes

Horror Addicts Episode# 101

Horror Hostess: Emerian Rich

Intro Music by: Cancer Killing Gemini


138 days till Halloween!

ann wilkes, murder weapons, lee, cushing, price

vincent price, baycon, horroraddicts.net panel, laurel anne hill, j. malcolm stewart, ha facebook page, buffy the vampire slayer, christopher lee, peter cushing, vincent price, horror addicts guide to life, look back in horror, j. malcolm stewart, a treasury of recipes by mary and vincent price, fashion avatars, world goth day, hr giger, band poll, end of the world radio, murder weapons, perish, even hell has standards, chantal noordeloos, tim lichtenberg, zombie nights, 60 black women in horror fiction, sumiko saulson, camp 417, web of deceit, smothered, deep like a river, tim waggoner, ghosts of punktown, jeffery thomas, events, halloween, jamie lee curtis, michael meyers, lost boys, goonies, joel schumacher, buffy the vampire slayer, joss whedon, kate beckinsale, wesley snipes, dead mail, not for norms, writer’s block, flash fiction friday, anne wilkes.


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Murder Weapons, “Perish”


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Press Release: Deep Like The River

front_600px__47162.1400605194.800.600The new horror novella Deep Like the River by Tim Waggoner is now available on DarkRegions.com and Amazon.com in ebook, trade paperback and signed deluxe slipcased hardcover edition at: http://www.darkregions.com/books/deep-like-the-river-by-tim-waggoner
“Waggoner’s new work is a new high water mark for him. Its chilling waters will take you into dark places…and weirdly enough you’ll have a great time. Recommended. Wear a life jacket.” – John Shirley author of Doyle After Death
It was supposed to be fun. A chance to get away. An opportunity for two sisters to bond and for one sister to heal. It was a small river, calm, slow-moving. Perfect for a leisurely canoe trip on a beautiful summer day.
But then they hear a baby crying on the shore, abandoned and overheated. Alie and Carin have to take her with them. They can’t just leave her there.
A simple canoe trip becomes a rescue mission. But there’s something on the shore, hidden by the trees. Something that’s following them every step of the way – watching, waiting . . .
Around every bend, the river becomes stranger, darker, more dangerous, until Alie isn’t sure what’s real and what isn’t. The river wants the child for itself, but no matter what it throws at her, Alie’s determined to get the baby to safety. She’s already lost one child. But she’ll have to fight the darkness that haunts the river – as well as the darkness within herself – if she doesn’t want to lose another.
Advance Praise for Deep Like the River
“I don’t know if I’ve ever read a story quite like Tim Waggoner’s DEEP LIKE THE RIVER. With its high emotional and metaphysical content and weird, surrealistic imagery, it reads a bit like Algernon Blackwood’s “The Willows” with Kafka collaborating and Carl Jung offering occasional advice. Or maybe it’s an adventure story that’s taken a sudden turn into The Twilight Zone. However you characterize Waggoner’s approach, the result is a fine piece of writing exploring the mysteries of a mind struggling with the guilt, pain, and terror of grief.” – Steve Rasnic Tem, author of Blood Kin
“The river down which the protagonist of Tim Waggoner’s strange, startling novella canoes with her sister flows from southern Ohio to the heart of a very personal darkness. What begins as an exercise in sisterly bonding travels into something more surreal and sinister, as the landscape around Alie and her sister, Carin, reflects and refracts their innermost memories and fears. The river in these pages might be called the Little Clearwater, but as the sisters learn, it is tributary to streams with names such as Styx and Acheron. With Deep Like the River, Tim Waggoner fixes his gaze on the winding course of human pain and misery, charting the flow of sin and sadness from one generation to the next, and does not look away. It’s fine, powerful work.” – John Langan, author of The Wide, Carnivorous Sky and Other Monstrous Geographies
“A descent into the madness of a ruined psyche, ‘Deep Like the River’ puts Waggoner’s talent for the eerie, desolate, and unpredictable in the spotlight. A must-read for those who like their horror tinged with desperation and guilt.” – Ronald Malfi, author of Cradle Lake
“Waggoner is a divine force in contemporary writing. Every new book of his I read takes me down dark and unruly passageways that bristles my fur and rattles my chains in ways that Ididn’t think possible. He’s as much a stylist as he is a storyteller. DEEP LIKE THE RIVER is certain to usher you into the realm of the dynamically Begotten.” – D. Harlan Wilson, author of Peckinpah: an Ultraviolent Romance
About the Author
Tim Waggoner has published over thirty novels and three short story collections, and his articles on writing have appeared in Writer’s Digest and Writers’ Journal, among others. He teaches creative writing at Sinclair Community College and in Seton Hill University’s Master of Fine Arts in Writing Popular Fiction program. Visit him on the web at www.timwaggoner.com