Press Release: Women in Horror Film Festival Call

Press Release: Women in Horror Film Festival Call

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Women in Horror Film Festival Call for Entries Atlanta, GA January 4, 2017 – The Women in Horror Film Festival is now open for submissions through FilmFreeway at https://filmfreeway.com/festival/WIHFF. WIHFF is excited to welcome their growing panel of judges who consist of Hannah Neurotica, founder of Women in Horror Month and the Ax Wound Film Fest, Melissa Hannon founder of Horror Geek Life, April Bedan, Manager of Fangoria Musick, Brandon Taylor of Hollow Tree Films, Tanya Chuturkova, NYC based creative producer/director and Terri Adams, Atlanta-based independent producer. We are also thrilled to have the support of The Writer’s Store, Minuteman Press, We Are Indie Horror, Horror Homeroom, Terror Films and Crimson Screen Horror Film Fest. Thank you for supporting Women in Horror! The festival will be coming to the community of Little Five Points September 21-24, 2017. Tickets will be available through the WIHFF website along with a schedule of events. WIHFF is proud to invite female horror filmmakers and screenwriters from around the world to submit their work to the fest. For more information on the fest and how to get involved, please visit us online at www.WIHFF.com or on Facebook & Twitter @WIHFF.

An interview with L.C. Cruell

I recently had a chance to talk to L.C. Cruell who has worked on such independent horror movies as 31 and Cemetery Tales. She is currently working on a new horror anthology called 7 Magpies which features some writers who we have showcased at HorrorAddicts.net in the past:

When did you start writing?

31_PosterLoResSMALLWhen I was but a wee lass. I lived in the country, so we spent a lot of time outside making up games and adventures and trying to see if we could spin at just the right speed and angle to turn into Wonder Woman. I think my very first story was called Strawberry Fields. About a cat named Strawberry who lived in a Field. As you can see my subversive tendencies had yet to make an appearance.

What were your biggest influences?

Films like 2001, The Shining, Star Wars (the originals), Indiana Jones, The Thing (80s), Tank Girl, and lots of great J-Horror, Euro-Horror, and Indie-Horror. Authors like Asimov, Pohl, Atwood, Shakespeare, and King. And, honestly, a lot of non-fiction. I was that level of geek that read encyclopedias for fun. I just fundamentally love knowledge, learning about new places, people, ideas, and possibilities. So, of course I loved all things history, sociology, anthropology, folklore, neurology, physics, astronomy, I just loved all of it. Still do. At my core, I feel that we’re here to learn as much as we can, grow, and then give back, create something new to add to the universe.

What got you interested in horror?

Horror, supernatural, fantasy, sci-fi, all deal with hypotheses and possibilities. They ask questions that start with, “What if…” Those are my favorite kinds of questions. Sometimes, they lead you to mind-blowing places, other times to dark, disturbing, places of warning. Both are intriguing to explore.MV5BMjMyMzc2NTY3NV5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwMzA5NjExNzE@._V1_

Could you tell us about your webseries 31?

31 is a supernatural horror/thriller told in 31, 31-second-long cliffhanger episodes about a character that wakes up in darkness and realizes she’s trapped, sealed in a box. She fights to get out only to discover that what lay outside the box is far worse. She has no memory and no ID besides the number “31” branded into her skin. It was initially released as a web event with episodes dropping everyday for 31 straight days at 3:31 each day.

The idea hit me in late September when I was looking forward to the upcoming 31 days of horror movies in October. It was such a trial-by-fire growth experience, as both a writer and director. I had to develop character, move the plot forward, generate suspense, and end on a cliffhanger all in just a ½ page of script! And then do it again, 31 times!!! Every word mattered. Then each episode had to be 31 seconds long, which meant we were in editing cutting down to the frame because every second mattered. It was pure insanity, but somehow it worked. The idea and the script got a lot of people excited so a lot of very talented people jumped on board and helped make it great. We shot it in 2 ½ days for $390 and released it 2 months later- also insane. We didn’t have any money for PR so it was all word of mouth and critical-acclaim. We got dozens of rave reviews and since had international festival selections and wins, Con invitations, YT partnership, and 9 different distribution deals with new subscribers and views everyday.

I’ve developed a pilot version. We’ll see where it goes. (It’s so bloody hard to break in to Hollywood from the outside.) But, I loved every moment of it!

Could you tell us about Cemetery Tales?

Cemetery Tales came about when one of the other directors came to me about putting together an anthology of short films by Atlanta directors. We did an Indiegogo campaign mainly to make ensure that we had the same great DP, Audio Sup, and Editor throughout. The stories are loosely tied together with a death theme and a wraparound I co-wrote. By the time it was finished I was one of the producers and came up with the idea of changing the name from it’s earlier Tales From Morningview Cemetery to Cemetery Tales. My segment I Need You is about a family that’s let the minutiae of life distract them from the act of living, and a house that may or may not eat people.

Because my writing comes from exploring issues and questions, there is always some deeper sociological, scientific, spiritual, supernatural, what have you, idea being explored. Otherwise, I’m not sure what the point would be, you know?

 

Where did the idea for Seven Magpies come from?

I LOVE horror anthologies. I’ve seen all the reruns of all the horror anthology shows from 60s, 70s, and 80s and all the films like Creepshow and even the old British films where in the end everyone realized they were already dead or in hell or something. So, I was so excited when ABC’s and VHS and all the others came along and made anthologies cool again. (Seriously, you couldn’t even pitch something with the word “anthology” before then. I know, I tried.) And as they kept coming, even XX, the all female-directed one, I noticed there were no black women directors, but honestly didn’t think much of it at the time. Until I started to see articles and posts even in my own women horror directors group asking if there were such a thing as black female horror directors.

I was stunned. It had simply never occurred to me that anyone would think there was a space in the world that was not occupied by people from any and every group. What could my gender or race possibly tell you about my relationship with horror, or with anything really? I don’t write characters with race in mind, but I don’t assume they’re all white or black either. They’re just people. We’re just people.

I know it sounds hard to believe but growing up in a small town where everyone knows you for being you made me horribly naïve about this kind of thing for a long time, but eventually I began to realize that “Perception is Reality.” Especially, in Hollywood, which, honestly, if I had known the depth of that town’s issues with gender, diversity, nepotism, and just general restrictiveness, I might have made different choices. A creative’s life journey is hard enough without all that BS. They don’t see us, so they don’t believe we exist, so they don’t think to hire or include us, so others don’t see us and the whole stupid loop just continues. “7 Magpies” is, I suppose, my way of yelling, “We are here! We are here! We are here!” Then after they see us and perceive us, we can all get on with the business of making great films together. Oh and this article helped a lot too:

https://thedissolve.com/features/exposition/916-horrors-scariest-trend-is-the-nonexistent-black-fi/

What are the stories that will be involved in the movie?

They’re so cool. It all takes place one sultry Southern summer when the Magpies (7 birds, 3 women) come to town. The structure is based on (and the stories were chosen to fit) the poem “One for Sorrow” –
One for sorrow,
Two for mirth,
Three for a wedding,
Four for a birth,
Five for silver,
Six for gold,
Seven for a secret,
Never to be told
The poem along with all the lore and superstitions regarding magpies made it kind of perfect. In the screenplay I adapted stories by Sumiko Saulson, Tananarive Due, Eden Royce, Linda D. Addison, Valjeanne Jeffers, Crystal Connors, and Paula D. Ashe. There are threads woven throughout that unite them all and a wraparound that connects them as well but yeah, great stuff.

 

When will shooting begin? 

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I’m hoping late summer. As soon as we find the right money people to come on board, we’ll dive right into pre-pro. The script, pitch package, everything is ready. The rough budget is $1M with no “names,” but with 7 strong, stellar roles for African-American woman, I’m pretty sure we can get a few names.

What is the hardest part of putting together a production like 7 Magpies?

It certainly wasn’t a lack of eagerness by the participants. Every writer and director I chose enthusiastically jumped on board. The only issue now is funding. Like anyone coming from outside Hollywood in not just location but gender, race, lack of connections, anything that makes you an outsider, the hardest part is getting this great script/idea that directors, audiences, and actors are exited to be a part of to the people who can actually greenlight something. It is not easy. Most gatekeepers do not welcome new names and faces. But, if any such person is reading right now, call me! We’ll find a way. This is too important. It is not just about widening the audiences for the authors or launching the careers of the directors to the next level but of changing that perception and opening those doors for everyone.

Where can we find out more about this production?

@The7Magpies

@GraveyardSister

www.facebook.com/7MagpiesMovie

What other projects are you involved in?

Good god. Everything I can do to get noticed? I just finished shooting Flesh, a thriller that was chosen LCCbiopic.jpg.w180h259for fiscal sponsorship by From the Heart Productions, a 23 year old non-profit, because they believe it will have a positive impact on society and the industry. Seriously, they’re all docs, dramas, and my little horror/suspense/thriller. But that goes back to the ‘everything I write having a message/question woven through it’ thing. I did the same thing as before, wrote a script strong enough to get incredible talent on board. It’s a short that stands on its own but is also the first 15 minutes of the feature version. Mistresses of HorrorTM is a brand with over 10 directors attached that I’m trying to start for any media project from movies to comics that provides “great horror, by women, for everyone.” Cemetery Tales is on the festival circuit now. I have pilots for 31 along with 2 others (The Four and Neph). And I’m currently marketing scripts The Sitter, Crimson, and The Burning (director attached; location secured), among others. In a perfect world, one project scores, and then all the rest tumble through to create that 15-year-in-the-making overnight success story and the names Cruell and Cruell World Productions become synonymous with great horror/genre features, shows, episodes, etc. The name fits. And I’ll do my best. We’ll what happens next.

For more information on L.C. Cruell check out:

http://www.cruellworld.com/

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm3145405/

https://vimeo.com/158551687

Press Release: Double-Barrel Horror eBooks

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Pint Bottle Press has recently released a new round of eBooks. Each author serves up two creepy tales for twice the terror and a dual dose of fun. The latest in the series features Amanda Hard, K. Trap Jones, and Matthew Weber.

Fast-paced, frightening and priced under a buck, each of these double releases delivers pulp horror fiction in digestible doses, although fair warning to the reader: Graphic story content may cause stomach distress. Aimed at horror-fiction fans who enjoy midnight movies with pizza and beer, Double-Barrel Horror is here to deliver.

Collect all six books, including the first three releases by J.C. Michael (Books of the Dead Press), Vic Kerry (Samhain Publishing), and “The Sisters of Slaughter”—the twin sister writing team of Michelle Garza and Melissa Lason (Sinister Grin Press).

All six eBooks are currently available for Amazon Kindle at http://www.amazon.com/. Learn more about the series at http://www.pintbottlepress.com/.

 

Master of Horror L.A. Banks and her contribution to Horror

Black Women in Horror:

 Master of Horror L.A. Banks and her contribution to Horror.

“If my soul got jacked, where is it?”L.A. Banks

Happy Black History Month! I want to start this out in saying, yes, this blog post will be long and peppered in fangirl moments. I will drone on about the awesomeness of author L.A. Banks and her extraordinary writing skills in horror/thrillers. I will gawk at the idea that she is not praised as much as she should be, and I will tear up at the reality that this author’s incredible gifts have been lost to us in the literary world. This is my respectful tribute to her…it is what it is. -smile-

banks6In the world of Horror, in link with black women, there are only two names that comes to mind for me that have been cultural innovators and pop icons in this area of literature. And today I’m choosing to speak on the one that I was lead to deeply admire, Leslie Esdaile Banks. Better known as L.A. Banks. When you think of horror, the greats who founded it, and those who followed in their footsteps, oftentimes many people don’t equate women in that class.

People always are quick to name the greats, Horace Walpole, Bram Stoker, H.P. Lovecraft, and contemporaries, Clive Barker and Stephen King as the masters of horror. I take nothing away from them. However, women were also at the forefront of horror. They were the literal foundation that inspired many past and current male horror authors that we so fondly idolize.

“Humans have been telling scary stories of great danger, defeat, and triumph since we built campfires outside the caves while the wolves were howling in the hills near us.” – L.A. Banks via Wild River Review 2011

Women of horror helped craft a culture within the medium that added character to how many male horror writers developed their own stories. A level of maturity, audaciousness, sensuality, and political/social commentary between the pages of great stories that scared us senseless. Who were the women that influenced horror? These founding women were: Ann Radcliffe, Mary Shelly, and more. Later they would influence and shaped the pens of contemporary women horror writers such as Carrie Vaughn, Anne Rice, Sherrilyn Kenyon, and Charlaine Harris. However, it is black women writers such as Tananarive Due and L.A. Banks who chose to elevate the medium and bring with them a fresh flair to the foundation that has sorely been missed, the reality of the black voice and everyday man/woman.

banks5L.A. Banks contribution to horror was shaped around where she came from and the no-holds bar realities of her life in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

“L.A. Banks’s career was born out of tragedy. Years ago, her six-month-old daughter was severely burned, she was going through a divorce, she lost her job when she took time off to be with her daughter, and she was broke. Yet somehow, in the midst of all the grief, she turned to writing – creating page after page of entertainment that kept her girlfriends so entranced they submitted the complete manuscript to publishers without telling her.” – Janice Gable Bashman via Wild River Review 2011

I’m very sure if you look at the lives of the founding women writers in horror, that they too began writing due to specifics in their lives that mandated them taking pen to paper. Culture shifts, frustrations with status, political views, a sense of advocacy in the world. Horror provided the appropriate medium for these women writers to showcase our most feared secret places in our psyche and spirit. L.A. Banks had a gift for doing the same thing. Before ‘Black Lives Matter’ was shouted, L.A. Banks characters in her well-loved and known horror/thriller/pararomance series, The Vampire Huntress Series and Crimson Moon Series, were actively in the streets kicking ass, and taking names later in the same branch of protest and demand for justice. Black Lives Mattered in all her works.

“Fear, hatred, oppression – that’s pure evil and it never lasts. Love endures.” – L.A. Banks via Wild River Review 2011

banks4         L.A. Banks was proud of being a woman writer in horror, paranormal fantasy and more. She was proud of her place as a black woman in the literary world as well. This is why she was ahead of her time. She created a culture where young and old could come together for a cause in saving ourselves from the pains of the streets and the political strife in our governments. Her characters bucked the system of global oppression without batting an eye.

Bloodshed, hearts being snatched out, fangs tearing into necks, demon possessions, werewolves and jaguars, naughty sensual sex. L.A. Banks world was intense and oh so good. What is masked as vampires and demons, monsters snatching people from their beds or in the streets, was a well-written allegory for issues such as police brutality, martial law, government cover-ups, drugs and poverty in our communities. Her works were even crafted as a way to speak about the disconnect between young and old in how we all viewed the lens of civil rights and social rights.

Again, L.A. Banks was ahead of her time.

“The vampire represents a lot of what we see in society. They’re scarier because of that; because the vampire can be anybody. He just blends in and looks perfectly normal. Like serial killers often look like normal people… the fear factor is that they’re among us.” – L.A. Banks via Wild River Review 2011

Her grasp of writing to reach those of us not only in the Black community but also in the Latino, and even white community was something that not many authors today can effectively balance. Listen, when you have a supernatural team of people tasked to save us from the apocalypse, and these characters come from every walk of life. Young, old, street kids, Jews, Latino priests, bikers gangs, southern folks, and more? You then have a mix for how we should be coming together to build ourselves up before we fall into destruction and also shows that on a human level, we all should be able to come together without issue. It makes reading her books immensely relatable. This is why L.A. Banks works resonated well with her fans.

“The more I know what is going on in the world, the more it effects my choices, how I vote, how I spend my money, how I relate to others. I am empowered by what I know, laid bare and ignorant by what I don’t know.” – L.A. Banks via Wild River Review 2011

banks3As a means to reach us all, L.A. Banks used her medium of scaring the hell out of you, while educating you without being preachy unless needed to be. Her style was deftly smooth and gripping, that in my opinion it influenced not only her readers but Hollywood as well. Case-in-point, before her passing L.A. Banks had been featured as a commentary for the behind-the-scenes look at HBO’s True Blood as it was premiered. Like many writers, we research our craft to create our worlds.

Not only did the writers do the same in shaping author Charlaine Harris popular book, but they also used the influences of many other writers to make it a richer environment. Once such influence was L.A. Banks slang and flair. “Dropping Fang” came from her works and found a way in the language of True Blood.

“…Vampires had taken the mantle as the perfectly dangerous lover – the forbidden, kinky, deep dark sensualist. Move over, vamps, somebody in pop culture let the dogs out. So we now have the phenomena where injustice, rage, plus the phase of the moon, means that the otherwise mild-mannered individual who is playing by the rules of society just gets fed up and rips your face off.”– L.A. Banks via Wild River Review 2011

banks2L.A. Banks had a powerful influential gift for writing. Had we not lost her, I believe that she and her works would have continued to not only help in our current climate today, but also changed the diversity of Hollywood.

As she stated back in 2011, “There is always a mentor, a Yoda, a Sensei, a learned master that helps the young initiate along their path of trials and tribulations until they emerge victorious.” Mama Banks you were our mentor, and master in the world of Horror, paranormal speculative fiction and more. August 2, 2011 is the day L.A. Banks parted from this world. It still saddens me that she is not celebrated more, because to me, she is right there in the ranks of Octavia Butler. Women in Horror have been overlooked and oftentimes ignored, especially with fellow women writers like myself. One day this will change.

We women are proud to take on the task of holding up the mantel of women horror writers like I’ve mentioned previously. It’s now up to the readers to turn a willing eye our way and step into our creepy, sinister, maliciously evil works and join us on our journey into greatness. Besides, we’ve been the inspiration for many male writers already. Why not continue the ride?

“Knowledge is Power.” – Carlos Rivera (VHL series)

L.A. Banks, also known as Mama Banks (to us fans), we miss you dearly. Thank you for being a beacon of light for myself as a writer and many others. I only hope that I become the same way as you were for me because when no one else will speak your name, I will. This is your right of honor as is your place at the Queen’s table for us black women writers. Thank you again and happy Black History Month!

 

***********

Born in Iowa, but later relocating and raised in Alton, IL and St. Louis, MO, Kai Leakes was an imaginative Midwestern child, who gained an addiction to books at an early age. The art of imagination was the very start of Kai’s path of writing which lead her to creating the Sin Eaters: Devotion Books Series and continuing works. Since a young childScreenshot_2016-01-31-15-02-55-1-1-1, her love for creating, vibrant romance and fantasy driven mystical tales, continues to be a major part of her very DNA. With the goal of sharing tales that entertain and add color to a gray literary world, Kai Leakes hopes to continue to reach out to those who love the same fantasy, paranormal, romantic, sci/fi, and soon, steampunk-driven worlds that shaped her unique multi-faceted and diverse vision. You can find Kai Leakes at: www.kwhp5f.wix.com/kai-leakes

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Read more of L.A. Banks interview with Wild River Review here: http://www.wildriverreview.com/Interview/L.A._Banks/From_Tragedy_to_triumph/bashman/October_09

 

Mimielle’s Musings: 10 Delightful Madwomen You Really Should Get to Know

Today if you Google “women…insanity”, you will mostly get hits for an exercise program that some people advocate with the dubious boast of it of making them vomit.  Instead, I will sit here with my nice cup of milky tea, curled up in my comfy chair and take you on a little tour of The Ophelia Gallery and reveal to you another view and definition in the form of a little list for your future reading pleasure…

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1. Emilie Autumn, present, not a character, mental health advocate, she is bipolar, a talented musician and addresses ‘madness’ through her music, stage shows and also through her semi-autobiographical writing, most notable to date is her hefty illustrated tome ‘The Asylum for Wayward Victorian Girls’ soon to be a self-narrated audio-book.
wuthering-heights

2. Cathy Earnshaw

(fictional character, Wuthering Heights, Emily Bronte, 1847)
janeeyre

3. Bertha Rochester

(fictional character, Jane Eyre, Charlotte Bronte,  1847 )
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4. Emma Bovary

(fictional character, Madame Bovary, Gustave Flaubert, 1857)

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5. Anne Catherick

(fictional character but based on a true story, The Woman in White, Wilkie Collins, 1860)
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6. Rebecca

(fictional character, Rebecca, Daphne du Maurier 1938)
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7. Anna Wulf

(fictional character The Golden Notebook, Doris Lessing, 1962)
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8. Esther Greenwood

(semi-autobiographical character, The Bell Jar, Sylvia Plath, 1963)
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9. Annie Wilkes

(fictional character, Misery, Stephen King, 1987)

 

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Notes & Quotes:

“If a man wanted to get rid of his wife, he would simply get two doctors to certify her and lock her up,” says John Sutherland, Emeritus professor of English Literature at University College London. “It’s what Dickens himself did when his wife kicked up a fuss at his affair.”

Many of these have been made into films but there is nothing quite like letting the madness creep in at 3 am when the world is full of shadows, the silence is all around and you and your mind are all alone together, the only ones awake.

In closing…”Mimi, why only nine, why not 10?”
“Why…does it…bother you?” 🙂

OK then, go read about Ophelia in Hamlet, she will be our #10.

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Mad Music Scream-Along for the Day: Emilie Autumn, “Opheliac”

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Stay Beautiful, Addicts! ~Mimielle~

Faith Dincolo – Celebrating Women In Horror 2015

Women In Horror 2015

 

Today we begin celebrating Women in Horror month on HorrorAddicts. There are so many talented ladies who encompass the entire industry. From actresses to screenwriters, to book reviewers, to paranormal investigators, and authors. Horror  would not be the same without women!

Let’s get to know a few of these incredible women this February and celebrate Women in Horror!

Faith Dincolo - Author & Screenwriter
Please welcome Faith Dincolo to the stage today!  I met Faith while exploring the raging torrents on Angel Falls in the Amazon where we were trapped by dinner-plate sized spiders ready to feast on our faces … er …. well not really … but it sounded good, huh?

Faith is an amazing lady inside and out. Hands Down! She has a heart of gold and many ghosts across the veil have discovered how wonderful she is as well.  Her unique gift has helped many a soul and has scared the living shite out of her as well!  Let’s get to know Faith a bit more, shall we?

As a child, what did you want to do when you grew up? How’d that work out for you?

My mother made all my clothes when I was a child, she even made my underwear. That left a lot of scraps for me to work with and I would create and design clothes for my dolls, my cat, the dogs, and anyone else I could narrow down and isolate.

I had this dream of being a clothing designer, a famous one! Now, I write about this dream while in my robe and slippers, and it is well past noon. My hair isn’t even brushed yet. The life of a writer doesn’t require me to be very high fashioned, and the poor cats around here are naked, except for their own fur.

I hear you are quite the Ghost Whisperer! Tell us a little about yourself and how the spirits from beyond communicate with you. Which one frightened you the most and inspired you to write a story?

I saw my first corpse when I was 7 years old, Mrs. Frieda, the lady who lived two houses down from my family. Her casket sat in the back of a large, dark viewing room, and was surrounded by tall candles. She was dressed in a satin red peignoir night gown set with large boa feather trim. The flames on the candles flickered upon her face and body.

It was in the middle of summer in Atlanta, Georgia and there was no air conditioning in the room. Sweat rolled down my face, my stomach lurched, I swore I heard her laugh, the same laugh she would cackle out when she fed the gray squirrels in her back yard and they would eat from her hand. My palms were soaking wet as I held onto my Brother Billy’s hand. Somehow, I managed to walk through the large room and up to her coffin.

I peeked in, and her face was heavily made up, her lips a bright red. I saw her eyes flicker at me, she winked, her voice floated around her, “You can see me!” she said. I ran from the room, full speed, my skinny legs were faster than eyes. I saw her shadow on the wall by the door, it appeared that she stood up from the coffin and was waving at me! I would be in my mid-twenties before I could sleep in the dark after that.

In my novel, Rules of the Dead, I use this experience to help my young protagonist, Ray, realize that he can see the dead. Over the years, I have learned there are ways to connect with ghosts or to block them. In the early years, I had a lot of fear with encounters, but as life went on, and I realized that I have control over what I experienced, it has eliminated the fears. I have studied with Astara, The Teaching Light Center, studied the Tarot for most of my life and other forms of communication systems.

Faith reading at Salton Sea - Day of the DeadOver the past several years, I have become more finely attuned to the voices of the dead as my clairaudient skills have increased.

I am getting to the point where I don’t like to stay in hotels because of the ghosts and shadows of voices from the dead. It is surprising how many ghosts are in hotels and not all of them are friendly, in fact, the hotel spirits are usually angrier than ghosts that I encounter at other places.

I had a disco era female ghost wake me up one night at a Las Vegas hotel and point to where I was sleeping, and she screamed at me “I died there.” Trust me, I moved away from that side of the bed! The next day in the bar at the hotel, I told the story to the bartender and she asked me what room I was in. I told her 772. The bartender got very quiet, looked around the bar before speaking and said “That would be Deidre. She was a famous overdose victim here in the mid 80’s. She was a groupie with Motley Crue’s Band.”
I checked out of that room within the hour of hearing that. Not because I have an issue with ghosts, but this one was angry, violent and possessive of where she died.

Yikes!  I’d definitely would have checked out of that room too!!

Do you prefer writing screenplays or novels?

Screenplays are blueprints for stories. Novels allow you to get into the interior of characters and hear and see what they are thinking. Characters in screenplays must act through visual means, who they are, is seen through their actions, and heard through dialogue.

Both mediums appeal to me for different reasons. Some stories are better suited for novels because of the growth of the characters, or the need to be in their heads. Other stories, especially very plot heavy stories, and action stories are better served by screenplays. I find screenplays to be more comfortable for me to write than novels as I am a visual person.

What advice would you give to writers just starting out?

Those folks new to writing should study craft and grammar along with the genres that they enjoy watching and reading. When a writer tells me they don’t read other writers in their genre, I say to myself that they are naive and why would they write their story without knowing if their storyline is currently saturated in the market by millions of other writers? How do you truly know your genre if you aren’t reading it and watching movies and TV shows within that genre?

What about the horror genre interests you? Disgusts you?

This is what I love about the horror genre:

“The terror, which would not end for another twenty-eight years – if it ever did end – began, so far as I know or can tell, with a boat made from a sheet of newspaper floating down a gutter swollen with rain.” – It by Stephen King

Great opening lines, scary characters, digging deep into the human mind and finding prehistoric demons, the fear of death, or worse, the fear of not being able to die. Horror that is extremely gory for the pornographic purpose of titillation disgusts me. Chainsaw massacre, Saw series are examples of that. I find I quickly lose patience with those story lines.

What was a time in your life when you were really scared?

My second pregnancy was problematic and I was very ill through most of it. After a prolonged labor, I had to have a C-section. I was strapped to a small table with a tube in my throat, and the anethesiologist had anethestized me wrong during the epidural. I went into seizures, and couldn’t even scream as I heard the doctor say to the anethiesologist, “We have to save the mother first.” I was terrified my son was going to die before even being born! After several more attempts to save me, the doctor was able to complete the C-section. I was very ill after that, and had many problems.

My son was healthy, but I struggled with tachycardia and severe panic attacks. I didn’t sleep for the first two weeks after the surgery, I couldn’t!

It really opened a portal of visitations from ghosts too, including the ghost of a little toddler girl, who kept calling out for her mother.

Finally, after about 2 horrible weeks, I was attempting to sleep when I saw a light at the end of my bed. It was different than the light of the other ghosts that had visited; this one was a soft yellow, fuzzy figure, a man. I heard his voice as he waved at me; it was my husband’s grandfather who had recently passed within the last year. I sat up in bed and grabbed my husband’s arm. His grandfather very clearly told me “You’re okay now, get some sleep.”

Do you look to your own phobias to find subject matter? Are your stories the products of nightmares, childhood experiences, fantasies?

Every story I write, whether screenplay, poem, short, or novel, is about my experiences. I may give the story to another character, but essentially, the stories have a core of my own experiences in them.

What is one stereotype about horror writers is absolutely wrong? What one stereotype is dead on?

Not all horror writers are dark souled people swaddled in black capes and stovepipe hats. You can’t look at a horror writer and say, “Why he’s another Poe!” I do think that horror writers are willing to go down into the pit hole of humanity and drag out the rotten bits and display them to us so that we are haunted by the thoughts of who and what we really are as humans.

Tell me how you feel being a woman has either enhanced or hindered your writing in the Horror genre.

When I was 11, I read “Interview with a Vampire,” by Anne Rice. I still remember lines of that story, and how dark the room was at night while I was reading. I heard something at my bedroom window, I couldn’t move, I couldn’t even breathe for almost a minute. From that moment on I was hooked on horror stories. It didn’t matter if a man or a woman wrote the stories, I wanted more!

Over the years, I’ve had people assume because I am a woman, that I am a romance writer. I laugh, I don’t correct them, and I offer to let them read my work, that evil giggle in my head hoping they will while thinking they are reading romance. I think being a woman has helped in some of my horror writing as much of my work is about ghosts and old secrets that come to light. I am a mother and know well the fear of worrying about my sons, and other family members.

I can completely identify with that! As Mothers, we do tend to think of every horrific possibility for our families, and what we can do to avoid those situations.

What’s on deck for Faith in 2015?

This is a busy year for me. I am one of the non-fiction editors for East Jasmine Review Literary Journal, and I’m the co-producer of “Her Story” a documentary based on literary short stories about women’s issues, with Renee McClellan of Rite-Works Productions. My plan is to have my YA novel “Rules of the Dead” complete by May, and my short story collection “Sacred Soil” for July.

I am currently writing short screenplays for my new web series “Wineovoire” that I am in pre-production with and looking to cast by late summer.
Last year I released my poetry collection “Me and Him, Married” and my image history book of Salina, Kansas with Arcadia Publishing.

More about my past projects can be found on Faithdincolo.com, LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest and IMDB.

And of course … my signature question – What is something that truly frightens you and how do you deal with it?

The evening news scares the hell out of me. We are a violent and exploitative species and watching the news loops, where 10 people were murdered in Los Angeles last night, and 8 the night before, haunts me.

How do I deal with it? I turn off the TV, or I turn on a horror movie, helping those fears have a way to release, or I sit down and write about the reality that we are a heathen lot.

Thank you so much for coming to talk with us today!  Do you have any questions for Faith?  We’d love to hear them?  Stop on by and share your thoughts!