Terror Trax: PORN the band

Band Name: PORN 

Members/ What instrument they play.

Philippe Deschemin aka Mr Strangler : Vocals, guitar, basse, synthetiser

Who writes your lyrics?

I do, Philippe aka Mr Strangler. Our current album, The Darkest of Human Desires – Act II  February 2019,  is the second part of a trilogy. The Ogre Inside – Act I is an album about inner struggle, about dark desires, how society can opresses your will. This is a fight no one can win, the Ogre that devours you from the inside always wins. The album is an invocation, a way to set the Ogre free, embrace your ”true-self” and allow your darkest desires to express themselves. It’s an incitement to act.

In this trilogy, The Ogre Inside won this inner struggle, giving birth to Mr Strangler.
In the Act II : The Darkest of Human Desires, Mr  Strangler, by embracing his “true-self “, expresses his dark impulses without limitations and has no boundaries.  With his crew, Mr Strangler commits murders and massacres. He  also invites everyone to make a step forward and act, invites you to express your darkest desires and join his death cult. For Mr Strangler and his team, the Ogre is released! Let the massacre begin!  Let the darkest of human desires be: murder.

I am working on whats happening in the Act III, maybe the final act! But I can’t tell more about it…
We are working on a possible comic book based on Mr Strangler and his crew.
I am a writer too, wrote a syfy novel and short stories. I am working on a new novel, a prequel of my first novel: Contoyen. So, I love to create characters and build stories, even in my musical work.

Contact

https://www.facebook.com/porntheband

https://porntheband.bandcamp.com/

https://www.instagram.com/philippedeschemin/

What singers or bands inspired you growing up?

David Bowie,  Robert Smith ( The Cure ), Carl McCoy ( Fields of the Nephilim )

Who are your favorite artists today?

I have so many … Tool, Paradise Lost, The Cult, Fields of the Nephilim,

What non-musical things inspire your music?

Philosophy and psychology. The actual trilogy is all about psychology and philosophy.

Is there a place where you go to be inspired?

During my footing, I have sometimes good ideas! Sometimes!

What’s been the greatest achievement of your band?

Working with Tom Baker. The man worked on so great albums : The Downward Spiral – NIN, Antichrist Superstar – MM , Hellbilly Deluxe – Rob Zombie. We worked with Tom on the mastering of our current album: The Darkest of Human Desires – Act II.

Where was the coolest place to play? Where did you enjoy yourselves the most?

We only have played in regular venue, but we would love to play in a scary place ( castle , church…)

What are your favorite horror movies?

To many! Shining, White zombie, Carnival of Souls, Videodrome, 28 Days Later, The Fly, Dawn of the Dead,  The Thing, The Descent, Get Out

What was the scariest night of your life?

I think, this night is to come …

If you could play anywhere in the world, where would it be and who would be your opening band?

Maybe in a mythic place like Whisky a Gogo… I would love to open for Alice Cooper, Gun’s roses, The Cure…

What are you working on now for future release?

We are recording the third act of our current trilogy, to be released in 2020!

Final thoughts.

Thank you very much for the interest. We are  PORN, you are PORN!

Advertisements

Terror Trax: Schultz

Band Name: Schultz

Franz : Electronics and vocals

Guitarfox : Guitars and vocals

Sandy Dynamite : Live dance performance and vocals

Who writes your lyrics?

Franz for the most, Me (Guitarfox) for the last

Website

https://blcproductions.bandcamp.com/

FACEBOOK

https://www.facebook.com/SchultzNewAlbumSoon/

SOUNDCLOUD

https://soundcloud.com/schultz-shot-of-pain

 

Album/Song/Tour we are excited about right now.

Shot Of Pain by Schultz, the album we’re here to promote right now available since the 06th May on BLC Productions

What singers or bands inspired you growing up? Growing up ?

Well…  TV cartoons generics !

Who are your favorite artists today?

Us ! The other ones are already taken.

What non-musical things inspire your music?

Bondage SM and Satanism.

Is there a place where you go to be inspired?

The internet.

What’s been the greatest achievement of your band?

Finishing this album

Where was the coolest place to play? Where did you enjoy yourselves the most?

There was the Volume in Nice, a nice place for gigs, but it closed definitely.

What are your favorite horror movies?

Rocky Horror Picture Show, and Pink Flamingos

What was the scariest night of your life?

The night before the baccalaureate

If you could play anywhere in the world, where would it be and who would be your opening band?

Any stadium in the world, they all look the same, wherever the place… Ministry, Rammstein, Revco…

What are you working on now for future release?

Promoting our album. For the rest, we’ll see later.

Final thoughts / Anything you want to tell the listeners?

Listen to our album, and buy it if you like. We needs your support.

Terror Trax: Hands of Ruin

Band Name: Hands of Ruin

Colin Z. Robertson – composition and production

https://handsofruin.com

 

https://twitter.com/HandsOfRuin

https://www.facebook.com/handsofruinmusic/

https://handsofruin.bandcamp.com

 

Album/Song/Tour we are excited about right now.

Schism was released in 2017 and had been written over the previous five years, and was the result of trying to push myself to create something harsher and darker than I otherwise would.

What singers or bands inspired you growing up?

Autechre and Aphex Twin inspired me to make electronic music, and then discovering the Cold Meat Industry artists such as In Slaughter Natives, Arcana, Raison d’être and Desiderii Marginis inspired me to work on dark ambient and martial industrial music.

Who are your favorite artists today?

These days I listen to a lot of the same music I listened to when I was young, but also Triarii, Wappenbund, Of the Wand and the Moon, Wardruna, as well as more danceable industrial music such as Front Line Assembly and Haujobb.

What non-musical things inspire your music?

I’m fascinated by all sorts of non-musical sounds. Listening to engines and machinery, or natural sounds, and thinking about the processes that produced them, often gives me musical ideas. Beyond that, music for me is a way of talking about feelings that I don’t have the words to describe, or am too afraid to put into words.

Is there a place where you go to be inspired?

There’s something contemplative and slightly melancholic about watching the landscape go past on train journeys that I find often gets me thinking about how I’d write some music.

What’s been the greatest achievement of your band?

I was very proud to have remixed two of Jo Quail’s tracks. She’s a superb musician and both tracks are beautiful pieces of music, so it was an honour to do that and see them released: https://joquail.bandcamp.com/album/hands-of-ruin-remixes-2

Where was the coolest place to play? Where did you enjoy yourselves the most?

I rarely play live, but I played at an art gallery in under some Victorian railway arches some years ago, so I was playing in a dungeon-like environment – all old brick, dust and cobwebs. It felt like the perfect setting for my music.

What are your favorite horror movies?

Nightbreed, The Company of Wolves, Alien, The Cabinet of Dr Caligari, The Fly

If you could play anywhere in the world, where would it be and who would be your opening band?

Playing live is not something that I particularly aspire to. I’m very content to make music in my bedroom. I’m not a performer. But if I were to play live then I’d want to turn the question around: who would I like to open for? It would be an honour to open for In Slaughter Natives, for example.

What are you working on now for future release?

I’m writing a soundtrack for Murnau’s Nosferatu. It’s still early days, but I’d certainly like to have it done in time for the film’s hundredth anniversary in 2022.

Anything you want to tell the listeners?

Thanks for taking the time to listen!

Terror Trax: Jon O’Bergh

Band Name: Jon O’Bergh

Members/ What instrument they play.

Jon O’Bergh / keyboards

Who writes your lyrics?

Jon O’Bergh (although many of my albums are instrumental)

https://obergh.net

Twitter: @jon_obergh

Facebook

YouTube

 

Album/Song/Tour we are excited about right now.

Ghost Story (album):  “Catacombs / Appian Way” (song)

 

What singers or bands inspired you growing up?

Meshell Ndegeocello, Tori Amos, Steely Dan, Jethro Tull, Nine Inch Nails, Herbie Hancock

Who are your favorite artists today?

Janelle Monae, Todrick Hall, Beck, Little Dragon

What non-musical things inspire your music?

Horror movies, ghost stories, science fiction

Is there a place where you go to be inspired?

Nowhere in particular.

What’s been the greatest achievement of your band?

Getting to meet horror director Guillermo del Toro and sharing with him a copy of the album Ghost Story.

Where was the coolest place to play? Where did you enjoy yourselves the most?

Playing on top of a mountain. This was with the band I had in college. We had to load our equipment into a gondola which ascended to the peak and swung in the wind. But the most enjoyable gig was playing for the Special Olympics. I’ve never experienced a more appreciative, enthusiastic audience.

What are your favorite horror movies?

The Conjuring. The Others, with Nicole Kidman. And two foreign movies: a Thai movie titled Shutter and the Japanese classic Onibaba.

What was the scariest night of your life?

Late one October night coming home from a gig. I parked the car and struggled to unload my synthesizer while the dry, demonic Santa Ana winds gusted. I was completely unaware that a few yards away from me, a serial killer crouched waiting to murder his next victim. The next day we found out he had broken into that neighboring apartment and murdered a young woman as she came home from a party.

If you could play anywhere in the world, where would it be and who would be your opening band?

I’d like to play in the ruins of an ancient coliseum. My opening band would be Little Dragon.

What are you working on now for future release?

I recently completed an album of horror-themed songs written by one of the characters in a companion horror novel. Each song represents a classic horror character: zombie, vampire, witch, etc. The album will be released in tandem with the publication of the novel.

Final thoughts / Anything you want to tell the listeners?

My albums span a variety of musical styles. The albums I think will especially interest patrons of Horror Addicts are 1) Specters of Twilight, an experimental electronic album inspired by Nine Inch Nails; 2) Tales from the Underground Bazaar, a collection of strange, true stories reminiscent of Laurie Anderson; and 3) Ghost Story, featured here.

Terror Trax: Laang 冷

Laang 冷
(Pronounced similar to “Long”).
Taohai Yang – all instruments, vocals, and lyrics
https://laang.bandcamp.com/

 

Album/Song/Tour you are excited about right now.     

We are doing an album release tour through Asia in June 2019!

What singers or bands inspired you growing up?

The bands Alcest, Harakiri for the Sky, and Chthonic most influence the music of Laang. However, my longest-running influences, in general, have been Tool, Radiohead, and Bach.

Who are your favorite artists today?

Bands like Alcest, Agrypnie, Sylvaine, and Woods of Ypres.

What non-musical things inspire your music?

My experience I had when I was shot. This is the main inspiration for the music of Laang. After being shot, I experienced something that I consider similar to an afterlife. It was like a universe that was infinite, but nothing was physical, including myself; I was infinite in the universe. There was no light, dark, up, down, anything like that. This was something that didn’t comply by the limitations of what the human mind can perceive. I find it difficult to describe, as our own rationality limits what we can understand, let alone describe it in words. But this was a world beyond description. And in it I was completely isolated. An infinite universe for an eternity, and I was the only presence. That type of isolation is crushing. Numbing. And yet, even with this feeling of isolation, I had a gnawing feeling that I was somehow unsafe. That I was being watched or pursued. This grew into a fear beyond words, a debilitating fear. It is this fear that inspires the music of Laang.

Is there a place where you go to be inspired?

It is such a potent memory that I feel like I don’t require much prompting to be inspired. I have constant reminders every day as I still continue my healing. When I want to write music or lyrics, I only have to sit down and do it, and it seems to just come to me. It’s rarely if ever forced. I almost hear what I want to write in my head, and I simply transcribe what I’m hearing before the thought evades me. In that sense, the composition process for Laang has always been quite efficient.

What’s been the greatest achievement of your band?

Well, we haven’t been around very long, but I suppose I am very proud of the fact that in only 6 months of being a band we have entered a record deal with one of our favourite labels, have scheduled a tour, and have had such a strong and welcoming reception from critics and fans alike. I am just so grateful for how things have gone so far.

Where was the coolest place to play? Where did you enjoy yourselves the most?

Laang hasn’t played any shows yet, but I’ve been in bands in the past. One of the coolest places I’ve played was on a barge in a lake. I’ve always loved the water, so playing in the middle of the water was a very cool experience for me.

What are your favorite horror movies?

This is a tough question, because I feel like there are elements that I love and hate in all horror movies. Usually I am bothered by contrived clichés and lackluster acting, but am a fan of the concept. I think that the film that I enjoyed the concept of the most was Sinister, simply because the idea of photos & videos moving, watching you, or having sentience is quite an alarming one, one that I remember fearing quite a lot as a child. I think that this was an interesting approach to this concept.

What was the scariest night of your life?

Bleeding in a parking garage, being in so much pain and lost so much blood that my whole body was paralyzed, cold, and numb. And remembering the sensation of blood slipping out of my mouth.

If you could play anywhere in the world, where would it be and who would be your opening band?

I would love to play on a boat. Perhaps in the North Sea off the coast of Iceland. Perhaps even just Iceland itself. Iceland is a hauntingly beautiful country with a landscape so alien and desolate. I find it one of the most visually inspiring and tranquil places on earth.

What are you working on now for future release?

Our digital album was released in December, and the physical digipak release is coming in May or June. I am focusing on working with the label to finish that first physical release. However, I wrote 2 new songs last week, so I would say that our second album is beginning to take shape. The sound of this album will be much in the same vein as the first, if not somewhat more depressive.

Final thoughts:

If you think that Laang sounds interesting, or you would like to hear more of the music then I would encourage you to find us online, check out the music, and spread the word. The more people that want Laang to play live in your city, the more likely we are to be booked on a tour there, which means we can come say hi and perform for you. I’m immensely appreciative of the support we have received so far and am looking forward to connecting with more of you in the future. Thank you so much.

https://www.facebook.com/LaangOfficial

https://www.instagram.com/laangblackmetal/

 

Chilling Chat: Episode 165 David Leinweber

chillingchat

David Leinweber is a historian with over 25 years of experience in the college classroom. He has published numerous articles, reviews, essays, and academic reference worksDavid Leinweber (including works on folklore, the occult, mythology, magic, and religion.) Dr. Leinweber is also a lifelong guitarist and pianist whose music has been featured in numerous venues, ranging from festivals and clubs to television, radio, theaters, and art galleries.

David is an amazing professor and an accomplished musician. We spoke of horror, inspiration, and the legacy of Dracula.

NTK:  Welcome to Chilling Chat, David. Thank you for chatting with me today. Could you tell us about A Song of Dracula? What is it about?

DL: A Song of Dracula is a romantic musical, loosely based on the classic 1897 novel by Bram Stoker, and also Jane Eyre.  It features a collection of original spooky songs, along with a few tavern singalongs.

It is about a young girl named Madeleine who arrives as a governess at a great estate in England, like Jane Eyre.  There is a romantic interest with the head of the estate (also like Jane Eyre).  However, witchcraft, vampirism, and a ghost enter into the story.  I really wanted it not to be gory or sensationalistic, however—no hissing or blood.  It’s a romantic story.

NTK: What inspired you to write this musical?

DL: Well, I’ve been a lifelong horror fan, especially of the old Victorian novels like Carmilla and Dracula, as well as the classic horror films.  I wanted this to be a production that evoked the romance and the historical/geographical settings of the old films, especially Hammer Films.  I also wanted it to be something that could range in targeted audiences from adult theater groups to community or high-school productions.

Interestingly, the word vampire does not appear in the story, though it’s obvious that is what is going on.

NTK: How much research went into A Song of Dracula? Did you try to incorporate songs appropriate to the time period?

DL: I would say that the play/musical reflects my long interest in horror, romance and gothic lit, if not flat-out research.  I did try to evoke spooky songs that have the spirit of a gothic estate.  There are also some tavern tunes that would be good for sailors or other port-city type characters right out of central casting (Laughs.)  However, I think the songs could be interpreted in a number of different ways.  I mostly envision them as spooky, romantic ballads.  But several could be done in a range of styles, including a few that could be hard-rock with electric guitar, and a light show.  I think a lot would depend on the director’s ideas.  For me, though, it’s a romantic Victorian gothic story, first and foremost.

NTK:  What do you think the attraction to Dracula is? Why does he have such a lasting legacy?

Bela LugosiDL: Great question.  I certainly think one could point to the classic psychological themes, like the fear of death, or subliminal sexual desires.  I also think that a good vampire story often has a folklore quality to it, and evokes a sense of being bound in time.  I sometimes think the classic elements of the Dracula tale don’t appear as much in vampire stories of the present-day when so many film studios want to update the classic elements.  Call it cliche if you want, but some of the classic horror tropes were very powerful and we should try to transmit them to the next generation.

NTK:  How did you discover horror? How old were you?

DL: Pretty young.  There was a guy on TV in Detroit when I was a kid called Sir Graves Ghastly—a Saturday matinee movie host who came out of a coffin hosted old horror movies, told bad horror jokes, read kids’ birthday cards, and all that.  I used to watch him every Saturday.  I remember all the “House of” horror movies he showed, which were truly classics, among many others.  I also was a big Dark Shadows fan, though pretty young at the time.

NTK: Do you have a favorite horror film?

DL: Another great question.  Hard to answer though (Laughs.)  I actually like some of the quiet, spooky films like Let’s Scare Jessica to Death.  But I think the Hammer films are my favorite, especially the three horror films they did that were loosely based on CarmillaThe Vampire Lovers, To Love a Vampire.  There was something special about the horror films of the late sixties and early seventies—it was still the hippie era, with all the creativity and mood that came out of it.  The fact that there were Drive-in Movies back then also created a big demand for lots of movies.  They weren’t all exactly Citizen Kane or The Godfather, but they were usually pretty fun to watch, and often surprisingly good.  That was also before Star Wars came out, which changed Hollywood into more of a Blockbuster mindset and the tasteful little movies, including B films and Drive-in Movie titles, became less common.

NTK: As a musician, did you find these soundtracks inspiring?

DL: Yes, a lot of those films had fine soundtracks.  The film I mentioned Let’s Scare Jessica to Death, in particular, had a really distinct soundtrack— quiet piano and flutes and guitar lines that really created that sense of loneliness, haunted locales, and, towards the end, isolation and fear.  That soundtrack really gave that sense of going back in time.  The Hammer Film, Lust for a Vampire, also had a really strange, very ‘sixties’ sounding tune—“Strange Love.”  It’s almost comical to watch it today because it can seem dated and out of place in the film, but it was actually a pretty eerie musical effect.

NTK: Who do you think portrayed the best Dracula?

DL: Of course, I like the Lugosi and Lee Draculas.  But Lon Chaney also did a good job and John Carradine.  But a sometimes underrated and/or less noted version was the Frank Langella 1979 Dracula, a very fine production.

NTK:  Do you have a favorite horror novel?

DL: Well, I guess the obvious choices would be Dracula and Carmilla.  But beyond those two classics, I remember that Stephen King’s Salem’s Lot really scared the heck out of me when I first read it, along with the 1979 miniseries.  When I was a kid, I used to read a lot of the cheap paperback horror novels, too, though I don’t have time for that anymore and I’m not sure if there is as big a market for them as there used to be.  Horror novels were kind of like horror movies.  They made a lot of them, which meant that there were often some quite good ones mixed in with others that weren’t’ so good, but it was always fun to read through the find the gems.

NTK: Do you think there’s any truth to be found in the folklore surrounding vampires? Do you think there are personalities who could be considered vampiric?

DL: Another great question.  Well, I certainly can see how the folklore had its roots—all the classic fears of premature burial, blood-borne diseases, or wasting away.  I also think the classic vampire motif that mixes terrible fear with desire is very powerful, for everybody.

And yes, I do think there are people who could be considered vampiric.  Not sure I want to give any names (Laughs.)  I think there are people who have a way of draining your energy and vitality.  They get stronger and richer, while you get weaker, more uncertain, and lose your zest for life.  But I guess the most classic vampire is a romantic attraction, and sometimes even kind of tragic and sad in the way they kill what they love.

NTK: David, what does the future hold for A Song of Dracula? Where can Horror Addicts see the musical? And, do you have any other upcoming horror projects?

DL: Well, I’m really hoping to have a good theater production do the musical.  Of course, Dark ShadowsI’d even love to have it turned into a film.  But first and foremost, it’s a theatrical production.  I’m still working on finding the right theater to debut the show, but hopefully soon.  I also enjoy writing ghost songs and am compiling a list of ghost songs to release as a song cycle.  My song “Daphne,” about the Kate Jackson character Daphne Harridge on Dark Shadows, remains my favorite song and it was the ghost song I wrote that got me the most inspired along these musical and storytelling lines.  Kate Jackson loves the song, which was encouraging.

NTK: Thank you so much for joining me, David. It’s not often we gain insight from an awesome educator like yourself.

DL: Thanks again for your interest in my musical and thoughts about horror.