Merrill’s Musical Musings : Spank The Nun

Spank the Nun 

Hello music lovers and greetings from sunny California. At least that’s one perk about living here during this crazy time when the only option I have for entertainment is my own backyard. I’ve been looking out my window at my car longingly for the past 18 days as our country experiences pandemic panic and potty paper paranoia. These are dark times, for sure, but one of the most important ways we survive the challenges life throws our way is through music and art. The music community has stepped up tremendously to meet the needs of their fans, and in return, their fans are giving back in new ways such as virtual tip jars on Venmo. As tours are canceled or postponed, artists are looking for new ways to raise funds for themselves and their crews as well as supporting efforts to combat the COVID19 virus. Livestreaming “living room concerts” has become the norm. Each day there seems to be a new artist participating. I enjoyed watching the Luck Reunion show on Twitch the first week we were home and I’ve even been participating in an online songwriting experiment with former Sick Puppies singer/songwriter Shimon Moore. Hear the fruits of our group’s labor here and support Shim’s page on Facebook. We gotta do whatever we can to stay sane during this unprecedented event.

 

“Here’s the chance to raise merry hell.” This month I’m reviewing industrial/electro darkwave artist Spank The Nun whose self-deprecating sense of humor is appreciated as we head into a new month of sheltering-in-place. The artist describes their music as “uneasy listening,” and when listing band members on their Facebook page responds with “Does it really matter?” You’re not getting uplifting tunes with this band, but the steady beat and the doom-filled lyrics are perfect for those days you need some dark background music to complete your, well, dark tasks. Hearing samples from favorites like the film Misery makes listening to their latest album, Initial Decay Control, a treat. I’m betting the artist was like that kid in high school I used to like sitting next to in the back of the room because they always had an odd and inappropriate commentary running for my twisted enjoyment. The sinister whisperings on tracks like “Rotting Meat” are creepy enough to make you look behind you while working alone in your home office. The song “Swallow” contains this quote, which I feel describes our current situation: “We all know when this ends, there will be no winners, only survivors.”  Spankthenun is an entertaining listen well suited for our peculiar predicament. 

 

Stay tuned for more of Merrill’s Musical Musings…

 

Merrill’s Musical Musings : Ro’s Recs April / In This Moment

Ro’s Recs April In This Moment Review 

What better way to spend our time on lockdown but by discovering new music? Artists all over the world have been doing live streams, living room concerts, and performing special acoustic tunes. I’ve found some amazing new artists like Tami Neilson, Devon Gilfillian, and Ida Mae as well as hearing some of my old favorites playing some incredible music like this collab between Machine Gun Kelly and Travis Barker covering Paramore’s Misery’s Business and Tyler Glenn from Neon Trees (http://www.instagram.com/tylerinacoma) doing his regular Songs from the Red Chair performances on his Instagram Live. Metallica is even streaming concert performances on YouTube and Facebook Monday nights. Let some good music into your lives and I promise it will make you feel better. 

Releasing a new piece of art during this unprecedented time is a scary proposition. I released a new book Friday, March 13th, just before most of California went into a mandatory shelter-in-place. Thankfully, my family is doing okay, but for musicians who have lost revenue from touring, releasing an album could be the only way for them to stay financially afloat. As artists, many of us are giving away our creations for free or at a discounted rate to keep shut-in folks entertained, but for musicians, losing money from canceled or postponed tours means taking a huge hit. SiriusXM is streaming FREE for this month, which is a HUGE opportunity for you to discover new music and I encourage you to get out there and support your favorite musicians however you can! Recommend their music, stream their albums on a platform like Spotify or Apple, and buy merch from their websites including CDs and vinyl if you have machines with which to play them. 

In This Moment, a phenomenal female-fronted metal band from Las Vegas, Nevada released their latest album Mother at the end of March and it is a deliciously decadent mix of original and cover songs. You’ve never heard “Fly Like An Eagle” performed quite so sensually as when Maria Brink stretches out those lyrics. Their last album, 2017’s Ritual, was filled with ruminations on witchcraft and dark elements, and that theme continues on the new record. Mother promises to be just as addictive as their previous material. Already I’m repeat-playing “Holy Man,” “God is She,” “Hunting Ground,” and the title track. So listen to the album, several times if you will, and then make sure you add a notification through Bandsintown or whatever source you get your live music recommendations from because you will NEED to see Maria Brink and Co. the next time they come through your town. They are one of the most exciting live acts on the road today. I’ve seen them at least three times and the theatrics Brink and her maidens bring to the stage, as well as the power and excellent musicianship the band exudes will provide a show like you’ve never seen before. Don’t believe me? Check out this live clip from the Loudwire Music Awards. HorrorAddicts, you will fall under the spell of In This Moment, I guarantee. 

That’s it for now, but I promise to bring you more of Ro’s Recs and reviews to keep your soul satisfied. Stay Tuned for more of Merrill’s Musical Musings… 

Merrill’s Musical Musings: The Music of Sharone

The Music of Sharone 

sharoneGreetings and welcome to another issue of Merrill’s Musical Musings. Today I’m checking out Denver Goth rocker Sharone. She started her career inspired by the haunting rock of Evanescence and has since created a sound that is unique. She’s opened for popular rock bands like Fuel, Saving Abel, Tantric, and Stitched Up Heart. Fans of bands like Nightwish and Lacuna Coil may enjoy her melodic tunes, which are full of deeply personal lyrics. Known for her energetic stage show, the artist experiments with different instrumentation and vocal styles and sounds creating a collection of stylistic songs. Her third album Reflection, which came out in December 2019, dances between gentle, mellow piano to hard-hitting and metal-infused beats that will catch the listener’s attention. “White Witch,” “Closer to Love,” and “Final Reflection” are high points on the album. Keep an eye on her social media for performances in the Denver area this spring. She’s working on new songs with her band and promises a great show.

 Social Links:

https://sharone-music.com         

https://www.facebook.com/sharone.official/      

https://mobile.twitter.com/sharone_music         

https://www.instagram.com/sharone_official/   

Download / Stream

https://music.apple.com/us/artist/sharone/1444696312

https://open.spotify.com/artist/3AmKAuGRZ8Ir8XTRl2IlXp

https://www.amazon.com/s?k=Sharone&i=digital-music&search-type=ss&ref=ntt_srch_drd_B004RP63DW

https://play.google.com/store/music/artist/Sharone?id=Axh2g6cipumpvbu3cshwjqqtnva

 

Merrill’s Musical Musings : Ro’s Recs

Ro’s Recs

The Prince of Darkness—Ozzy Osbourne himself—released a phenomenal album at the end of February. Ordinary Man is Ozzy’s twelfth studio album since he left Black Sabbath in 1979 and embarked on a colorful solo career. Super producer Andrew Watt (Post Malone) helped Ozzy create a beautiful piece of music that has echoes of 70s glam rock, Sabbath-inspired metal, and even a Beatles-esque tune with legend Sir Elton John. Friends Slash, Duff McKagan (Guns ‘n’ Roses) and Chad Smith (Red Hot Chili Peppers) as well as Post Malone, Travis Scott, Charlie Puth, and Tom Morello all make appearances on the heavy album that takes a lot of chances and yet still sounds like Ozzy perfection. Actor Jason Momoa even did a teaser video for release day. Ozzy has definitely been to hell and back, and with his recent diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease, he’s still got stories to tell. I listened to an album release party on SiriusXM-Ozzy’s Boneyard with his pal Billy Morrison and Ozzy admitted that working with Andrew Watt saved his life as he went through the most difficult health crisis of his life. Let’s hope he’s well enough to gift us with more music in the coming years. Check out Ordinary Man, streaming on Spotify and other vendors.

That’s it for this month. Stay tuned for more Merrill’s Musical Musings… 

Merrill’s Musical Musings : Ro’s Recs

Ro’s Recs

Many great albums were released in 2019, and while I’m not a big list maker, I thought I’d share a few of them here. Some bands have been with us for decades like Slipknot and Korn and others were new to me. Bands like Papa Roach, Sleeping with Sirens, Volbeat, and Bring Me The Horizon took big risks on a new sound that paid off well. We lost Vinnie Paul from Hellyeah, but the band gave him a beautiful sendoff with Welcome Home. Motionless in White and New Year’s Day put out powerful albums that cemented their status in the rock community as artists that have fought long and hard to be there. Baroness returned from a harrowing tragedy to put out a strong album. I Prevail had a fairytale beginning with a cover of Taylor Swift and this year they’ve been nominated for a Grammy! And lastly, The Hu, Fever333 and Bad Wolves were all new bands to me that I am glad I took a chance on. I hope you will too. 

Slipknot – We Are Not Your Kind

Bring Me The Horizon – Amo

Papa Roach – Who Do You Trust?

Hellyeah – Welcome Home

Motionless in White – Disguise

New Year’s Day – Unbreakable

Volbeat – Rewind, Replay, Rebound

Korn – The Nothing

The Hu – Gereg

Baroness – Gold and Grey

Bad Wolves – N.A.T.I.O.N.

Fever333 – Strength in Numb333rs

Sleeping With Sirens – How It Feels To Be Lost

I Prevail – Trauma 

There’s a wide variety on this list, a little something for everyone, so as we prepare for a new year of music, give some of these a listen.

What are you looking forward to in 2020? Leave a comment and let me know what music I should be looking out for in 2020. And with that, Stay Tuned for more of Merrill’s Musical Musings…

Merrill’s Musical Musings – HorrorAddicts.net Season 13’s Best Band of 2019

Greetings HorrorAddicts! This year has already been chock-a-block full of great music, but today we’re going to revisit a highlight from 2019. The Lords of October were the reigning champs in the HorrorAddicts.net Best Band competition from Season 13 and we have a quick interview with them to catch you up on all the latest news. 

How has winning Best Band of HorrorAddicts.net Season 13 changed your life? At the very least, how does this impact you as a band?

We are terrified by and excited for this news! It’s an honor to be recognized for this and to be held in regard by Horror Addicts.net. We feel as though we are on the right track with such a vote and we look forward to making more monster music that will be —hopefully—loved by those who are our brothers and sisters in horror! This, in our opinion, gives us further horror cred and is exactly the type of award we would strive for. We thank you all!

-Uncle Salem

What’s your latest news? Any new adventures? When can fans expect new material?-

The latest music is going on a record inspired by tales of cryptozoology. You know, like hidden creatures and wild mythos and stuff. We have some tunes that are inspired by the Mothman, Loch Ness, the Mongolian death worm and other such things. I have always loved monsters and consider myself a bit of a cryptozoologist, but I was truly inspired after attending the Mothman festival in West Virginia this past summer. It was a lot of fun, but also where the tragic deaths occurred. 

We are always working hard at new ideas and music, always bringing new stuff to the table. For this new one, we are attempting a more collaborative songwriting effort. We shall have a little more of all of us in the entire creative process. So far, I have written 5 songs for it and Aleister has come up with a couple. We will mix and match and see what happens. 

We will probably have it out around fall of 2020. It all depends on the daily goings-on of everyone and what we are able to do. We are always looking to play some great shows and make some new videos. Taking it all a day at a time!

-Lucifer Fulci

Best Horror Movie/TV Show/Book of 2019 in your humble opinion?

I saw It Chapter 2 this year and I thought it was fantastic. Best horror movie of the year in my opinion. The acting was great and Bill Skarsgård’s performance as Pennywise creeped me to the bone.

-October Phoenix

What title would you most like to earn/award you’d most like to win moving forward in your career?

Best KISSfits band ever.

-Aleister Kane

Anything to add?

Lords of October is a hell of a great band and I love to play with these guys. There is a very eclectic influence that plays into some of the styles that you can hear in the music. I enjoy writing music and seeing how these guys interpret it and make it their own. I also like when they bring stuff to me and allow me to add something to it. I have been making music a long time-a lot on my very own and I enjoy the solitude. (I will have a new solo record out in 2020, also- www.LuciferFulci.com) But to play with Lords, its very special. Like, literally and figuratively, I get to come out and play! 

-Lucifer Fulci

Congratulations to Lords of October and we can’t WAIT for more creepily delicious music! 

That’s it for today. Stay Tuned for More Merrill’s Musical Musings…

Merrill’s Musical Musings: Cellmod Review

Merrill’s Musical Musings – Cellmod Review 

Greetings and salutations. Welcome to March! It’s nearly Spring, Daylight Savings Time is just around the corner, and in California, the trees are blooming, the sun is shining, and the primary election is happening soon.

Many things are afoot in Ro’s world and things are about to get hectic. I’ve got a new supernatural suspense novel—Healer—releasing on Friday, March 13th, and then I’m off to Nashville for the Book Lovers Con March 18-22.

I plan to do some music-related visits such as Third Man Records—Jack White’s record label and vinyl factory—and southern songwriter and alternative rapper Yelawolf’s Slumerican made flagship vintage clothing store and barbershop. I’m also going on a bus tour with a bunch of drunken friends where we’re supposedly getting some history of the town, but if you have suggestions of can’t-miss music locations—bonus points if they’re haunted—please leave them in the comments or hit me up at rlmerrillauthor@gmail.com or www.facebook.com/rlmerrillauthor. I’ll be posting pics on my author page as well as my Instagram @rlmerrillauthor and I’ll tag you if you leave me a suggestion. 

This month’s review is of EDM/Trance/Trip-Hop artist Cellmod’s new album The Dissident. According to his bio, “Cellmod was born to display an adaptation to his surrounding environment. The name itself signifies a desire to unify with the very roots of one’s physical being, or in simpler terms, Cellmod is taking it back to the vibe and pulse of the music.” I can definitely feel that vibe as I listen to standout tracks such as “Ransacked” and the naughty, old school sci-fi tinged “Harder Serum.” I can picture a woman with dark hair perched atop dramatic stilettos in a fitted pencil skirt and blazer as she walks with purpose down a stark white hallway, passing unmarked doors. The clack-clack of her heels is drowned out by the ominous sound of “The Machine” as she enters a laboratory where classified experiments are being done on unsuspecting young male subjects. Oh…did my imagination carry me away there for a minute? Fine. I will say that the track “Let Them Sleep” gives me a very Nine Inch Nails groove that I dig very much. If electronic music is your jam and you like to have some well-produced, good quality background music to do your…experiments to, Cellmod is your guy. Check out The Dissidents today!

Stay tuned for more Merrill’s Musical Musings… 

Merrill’s Musical Musings: Her Despair

Her Despair 

Greetings and Salutations for a brand new year and decade that I am confident will be filled with amazing music. I’m Ro, your musical tour guide, and today I want to introduce you to a Goth rock outfit from the UK called Her Despair. Their music will take you right back to those 80s afternoons sitting in your bedroom listening to cassettes—or perhaps your vinyl collection—waiting for the night to fall and bring with it the creepy darkness where anything can happen and life is just a little more interesting. 

 

Her Despair melds together sounds of Peter Murphy and Sisters of Mercy as well as current artists like Nightwish and HIM. Their latest release, Exorcisms of Eroticism, was released in summer 2019 and contains melodic jams like “Pandaemonium” and “The Exorcism,” which has an appropriately dark music video to go along with it. “In That Moment” is my favorite track on the EP. The haunting, romantic vocals dance over the dichotomy of the synthesizers and guitars, giving it a nostalgic sound, but you could also expect to hear it on a modern-day alternative rock station. “Like a Crucifixion” is another excellent example of their sound. A steady rock beat with powerful lyrics make for an enjoyable combination and will have you slipping into Her Despair like a comfortable pair of black fishnets…or a worn pair of Doc Martens. 

For more on Her Despair, check them out at the links below.

https://www.facebook.com/herdespair/

https://www.instagram.com/herdespairband/?hl=en

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVZhKFjVsq1Wpbruy-dryuw/featured

See also my companion article this month: Ro’s Recs Best of 2019, here at Horroraddicts.net

Merril’s Musical Musings: Her Despair and Best of 2019

Her Despair and Best of 2019

Greetings and Salutations for a brand new year and decade that I am confident will be filled with amazing music. I’m Ro, your musical tour guide, and today I want to share with you some of my favorites from the past year and introduce you to a Goth rock outfit from the UK called Her Despair. Their music will take you right back to those 80s afternoons sitting in your bedroom listening to cassettes—or perhaps your vinyl collection—waiting for the night to fall and bring with it the creepy darkness where anything can happen and life is just a little more interesting.

Her Despair melds together sounds of Peter Murphy and Sisters of Mercy as well as current artists like Nightwish and HIM. Their latest release, Exorcisms of Eroticism, was released in summer 2019 and contains melodic jams like “Pandaemonium” and “The Exorcism,” which has an appropriately dark music video to go along with it. “In That Moment” is my favorite track on the EP. The haunting, romantic vocals dance over the dichotomy of the synthesizers and guitars, giving it a nostalgic sound, but you could also expect to hear it on a modern-day alternative rock station. “Like a Crucifixion” is another excellent example of their sound. A steady rock beat with powerful lyrics make for an enjoyable combination and will have you slipping into Her Despair like a comfortable pair of black fishnets…or a worn pair of Doc Martens. 

For more on Her Despair, check them out at the links below. 

The Exorcism” video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Clqrj6rftJA 

https://www.facebook.com/herdespair/

https://www.instagram.com/herdespairband/?hl=en

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVZhKFjVsq1Wpbruy-dryuw/featured

 

Ro’s Recs

Many great albums were released in 2019, and while I’m not a big list maker, I thought I’d share a few of them here. Some bands have been with us for decades like Slipknot and Korn and others were new to me. Bands like Papa Roach, Sleeping with Sirens, Volbeat, and Bring Me The Horizon took big risks on a new sound that paid off well. We lost Vinnie Paul from Hellyeah, but the band gave him a beautiful sendoff with Welcome Home. Motionless in White and New Year’s Day put out powerful albums that cemented their status in the rock community as artists that have fought long and hard to be there. Baroness returned from a harrowing tragedy to put out a strong album. I Prevail had a fairytale beginning with a cover of Taylor Swift and this year they’ve been nominated for a Grammy! And lastly, The Hu, Fever333 and Bad Wolves were all new bands to me that I am glad I took a chance on. I hope you will too. 

Slipknot – We Are Not Your Kind

Bring Me The Horizon – Amo

Papa Roach – Who Do You Trust?

Hellyeah – Welcome Home

Motionless in White – Disguise

New Year’s Day – Unbreakable

Volbeat – Rewind, Replay, Rebound

Korn – The Nothing

The Hu – Gereg

Baroness – Gold and Grey

Bad Wolves – N.A.T.I.O.N.

Fever333 – Strength in Numb333rs

Sleeping With Sirens – How It Feels To Be Lost

I Prevail – Trauma 

There’s a wide variety on this list, a little something for everyone, so as we prepare for a new year of music, give some of these a listen.

What are you looking forward to in 2020? Leave a comment and let me know what music I should be looking out for in 2020. And with that, Stay Tuned for more of Merrill’s Musical Musings…

 

10iversary Chilling Chat with Michele Roger

10IVERSARY

Michele Roger is a speculative fiction writer living in the Detroit area with her spouse and her evil cat named Monster. She also writes paranormal romance under the pen name M. M. Genet.  You can listen to her most recent, free podcast, Agent For the micheleOrchestra wherever you get your podcasts or on iTunes.  When Michele isn’t writing, she is a harpist and a music composer for podcasts. Michele appeared on Season 1 Episode 9 with “Taste of the Dead,” Season 2 Episode 13 “Santa Claws,” Season 3 Episode 25 “The Conservatory,” Episode 31, Season 4 Episode 43, and Season 13 Episode 160. She is the spark that started the Wicked Women Writers.

1.)    How old were you when you first became interested in horror?

My earliest memory of reading horror was with my friend Terry Akerly in the 8th grade.  My mom didn’t really approve of a girl reading horror at the time, so Terry shared his Stephen King books with me.

2.)    What is your favorite kind of horror? (i.e. Classic, Splatterpunk, Slasher, Gothic, etc.)

Reading is like everything else; one’s tastes change as we get older.  While I gravitate towards Classic and Gothic, I’m open to reading just about anything that has a new spin on it; be it paranormal romance or alien horror.

3.)    What is your favorite horror novel?

There is a special place in my heart for Thinner by Stephen King.  In college, I was studying to be a lawyer.  The main character is a slightly unscrupulous lawyer who gets cursed by a gypsy for his dishonesty while presenting a case against her.  The curse is so simple and so elegant.  I loved that about the story.  King took an everyday occurrence with an average guy and turned it into something that kept me reading well into the night.

4.)    What is your favorite horror TV show?

Honestly, I don’t watch enough tv to be able to answer that question.

5.)    What is your favorite horror movie?

It probably sounds cheesy, but my favorite horror film (and its tough to choose) would be The Woman in Black.  There is so much to love.  The main character is young and naive but is a male and a lawyer.  (Lawyer theme again.  I never realized….ok anyway)  So many stories the main character in distress is female.  I really enjoy that role reversal.  Also, the predator/ghost is female.  Also, another trait and role reversal that I enjoy.  Add the creepy gothic mansion, a time pressure element of the receding and swelling tide and the primary prey for the predator being children of a village an entire community longs to protect and you have a perfect movie.

6.)    How did you first become involved with HorrorAddicts.net?

I wrote a short horror story and a friend of mine encouraged me to send it to HorrorAddicts.  That was roughly 2008?  I’m guessing.  Emz encouraged me to send in more.

7.)    What is your most favorite memory of the HorrorAddicts.net Blog? (i.e. favorite blog post written by you or someone else, favorite funny memory, etc.)

HorrorAddicts offered a horror writing contest for just women.  The stories that came from that contest were so well written and so well received.  I had been writing horror and science fiction for a while, feeling quite alone in Detroit.  All the other speculative fiction writers I knew were male.  The all women’s writing contest opened a door to other women all over the country who were writing all kinds of horror.  Eventually, some of those stories became a book and now we have a writing group for female horror writers.  So much good has come from HorrorAddicts.

8.)    What is your favorite part of the blog? (i.e. Book Reviews, Movie Reviews, Interviews, Game Reviews, Free Fiction, Crafting, etc.)

Whenever I’m looking for something or someone new to read, I check out the Book Reviews.  I also like to read the interviews on my lunch at work.

9.)    Why is this part your favorite?

The book reviews are just a handy resource.  Sadly, my small, Michigan town outside of Detroit doesn’t have a local bookstore anymore.  We have one big chain store but finding someone in there to recommend horror is often like finding a needle in a haystack.  HorrorAddicts book reviews and interviews fill that void.  I find new and established authors, learn a bit more about them and find new titles to pick up for my next night of reading.

10.)  What would you like to see on the HorrorAddicts.net Blog in the future?

There are a lot of people making short horror films.  It might be fun to showcase them?  A B Horror movie film festival to stream???

Addicts, you can find Michele’s work on Amazon as Michele Roger and as M.M. Genet. You can find her music here.

Merrill’s Musical Musings:Coyote Kid

 

Merrill’s Musical Musings with Coyote Kid

Greetings HorrorAddicts! November is the month of gratitude, and I’m sure we are all grateful for music. I’m ecstatic to be here with you to share a new album by Coyote Kid and to share some of my current musical musings and obsessions.

I’m utterly transfixed by this new album from Minneapolis-based Coyote Kid. I recently attended a writing workshop where the presenter talked about writing to your id, you know, that place where all of your happy meets. Upon first listening to their song “Strange Days,” my id perked up and listened greedily. Dark atmosphere, jangly guitars, a horn section, a male singer with a full, tortured voice that exudes emotion…Check, Check, Check! I hear a little Bad Things by Jace Everett, a little Big Wreck, a little Dick Dale and some Concrete Blonde. 

Some standouts on the album titled Skeleton Man include the title track, “Femme Fatale,” which has a Quentin Tarantino-esque music video with a beautiful woman and a vampiric car, and “Run.” The band describes their sound as cinematic and I concur. There are several moments on the album that would provide the perfect soundtrack to a film. I can see Antonio Banderas with his guitarra in a Robert Rodriguez film, or imagine a scene from the HBO show True Blood where creatures of the night stalk the unsuspecting folks in Bon Temps, Louisiana. 

You can find Coyote Kid at the following links and you can even become a patron on Patreon to unlock special content. 

http://coyotekidmusic.com/

https://www.facebook.com/coyotekidofficial/    

https://twitter.com/coyotekidband

https://www.instagram.com/coyotekidofficial/

https://music.apple.com/us/album/femme-fatale-single/1468490521

https://open.spotify.com/artist/0MW6kFfsIdCMs4IF9WDAzb      

Ro’s Recs

September saw a slew of new releases from bands I’ve loved forever. One of the standouts was the latest from Italian metal band Lacuna Coil. Their latest album Black Anime is heavier than their previous release and full of fantastic tunes like “Layers of Time” and “Reckless,” but it’s the opener, “Anima Nera,” that has the witch in me chanting happily. Cristina Scabbia is a goddess and I urge you to give them a listen. Black Anime on Spotify

Hellyeah suffered a tremendous loss this past year with the death of beloved drummer Vinnie Paul, formerly of Pantera and Damageplan. The band soldiered on and released their album Welcome Home as a tribute to Vinnie. There are some massive grooves on this album such as “Oh My God” and “Boy” that will rip your guts out and stomp all over them and you’ll love every second of it. The track “333” will get you ready to jump up and get in the pit. There is so much raw energy in this album. Chad gray really went deep with the lyrics on this album and the anger and anguish are tangible. I know Vinnie would be proud. If you’re a new fan, get ready to fall in love. You can listen to Welcome Home on Spotify.

That’s it for November’s Merrill’s Musical Musings. I’d love to hear what you’re thankful for this month. Which band has your gratitude? Leave a comment or find me on social media: Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram. Stay Tuned for more Musings and Rock ‘n’ Romance…  

 

Merrill’s Musical Musings: Zwaremachine Review


Greetings Horror Addicts! I’ll be your new tour guide through the melodious and sometimes macabre world of music shared with HorrorAddicts.net for your greedy consumption. I’ve been a music fan my entire life, especially the metal variety, anything you can dance to and most places in between. In my day job, I educate America’s youth, sometimes even on the subject of music. I’m also a mom of two teenagers, both of whom are huge music fans, and at night, by the light of the full moon…I write stories full of hope, love and rock ‘n’ roll that often have some sort of tie-in to horror, the occult, monsters…you name it. I want to thank Emz for bringing me out of the darkness and into the…well, more darkness, but a different darkness, full of fellow music and horror lovers. 

This month we’re listening to an industrial band out of Minneapolis called Zwaremachine. Music that can take you away to another place is exciting and always worth a listen, and upon pressing play, Zwaremachine did just that. I immediately imagined myself dressed in black leather and chains walking into the depths of a seedy nightclub in a warehouse in the middle of a bleak urban landscape full of all the cool-kid creeps and crawlers. It was easy to picture a vampire having a sip from a willing patron at the bar, or a witch telling fortunes in a dimly lit corner. Bodies are moving in time to the driving beat, reaching for that climax where the DJ drops the bass when John Wick comes blasting through with machine gunners on his tail. Any music that can drop you into a scene like that and have you anxious to experience what’s next is a win in my book. 

Zwaremachine have been on tour in Europe and the Midwest this year. They are currently working on a special edition re-release of their 2018 album “Be a Light” with worldwide distribution. In September the band will be back in Europe on the “Elektro Tanz Tour” dates in Belgium and the Netherlands with Vuduvox(FR/BE). 

Zwaremachine will be performing as full line up with Mach Fox(vocals/synth), dbot(bass/vocals) and they have recruited Dutch percussionist Dein Offizier(drums) for these shows “to give the full impact of their minimal hypnotic approach to body music.” I highly recommend that if they play near where you are you give them a listen! I’m a huge proponent of attending live shows and supporting musicians, so check them out.

Fans of the Underworld or Blade series will most likely dig their sound. Their song “Remain Unseen” (especially the VUDUVOX Remix) is an ominous track that made me think of Nitzer Ebb and Rammstein. If industrial is your bag, check out Zwaremachine.

In preparation for writing this review, I got a kick out of reading this interview with their leader Mach Fox from the Horror Addicts archives. https://horroraddicts.wordpress.com/2018/10/12/terror-trax-zwaremachine/

If you want to hear more for yourself, check out the band at these sites:

WEBSITE:http://www.zwaremachine.band/

streaming/dl: https://zwaremachine.bandcamp.com/

ig/twitter: @zwaremachine

I’ll be back next time with more music reviews, but I’d like to end each post with one of Ro’s Recs (that’s me!). For my first recommendation, I have to give it up for Slipknot’s latest We Are Not Your Kind. This album has all the rage and hostility one expects from the Iowa band, but there’s a vulnerability and urgency in the lyrics that is a welcome surprise from these veteran metalheads. I was fortunate enough to see them on the opening night of the U.S. Knotfest Roadshow and I was elated to experience the new songs live. Highlights for me include Spiders (oh yeah, you’ll keep that piano riff in your head for a long time after) and Critical Darling and A Liar’s Funeral are phenomenally heavy. Check it out, let me know what you think. You can reply here or you can always find me on the socials @rlmerrillauthor or in my evil lair at www.rlmerrillauthor.com. I can’t wait to hear what you think of Zwaremachine and the new Slipknot. 

Stay Tuned for more of Merrill’s Music Musings on HorrorAddicts.net…

Terror Trax: Ashes Fallen

Band Name: Ashes Fallen
Members: James Perry, Michelle Perry, Jason Shaw

Ashes Fallen:
Youtube
Facebook
Web

Answers by band leader James Perry

Ashes Fallen song you are excited about right now

James: I love all of our songs! I’m really happy with “Start Again”. That was the very last song we put together for the album, and we barely got it together in time, but it turned out great. I love how it sounds, the lyrics are something I really wanted to say, and I’m so proud of us for getting it done in time. Sometimes that pressure and focus from a deadline can really inspire something good.

What singers or bands inspired you growing up?

James: I grew up in a house filled with classical music. I think being exposed to the classics still inspires a lot of how I write. Like most kids of my generation, I was all about the Michael Jackson “Thriller” album. He was just so cool. Later, the first time I saw   on MTV, it changed my life. I wanted to be an electric guitar player. A little later I got into Pink Floyd (like many high school kids do) and they were a huge influence… the huge sound and sound effects, the simple melodicism of David Gilmour’s leads, the depth of the lyrics… Everything changed for me again at age 15 or so when I first heard Skinny Puppy. They were my gateway drug into all this spiky, black hard-edged music I’ve come to love.

Who are your favorite artists today?

James: I still enjoy a lot of metal. Devin Townsend is my favorite musician of all time and he’s still doing amazing work. There’s so much great new dark music happening now. I just heard a post-punk band from Berlin called the Golden Apes for the first time the other day and they were just great. An amazing voice, really dynamic songwriting. A few years ago, Michelle and I saw a post-punk band from Mexicali called Silent and they completely blew our minds. Such great music and such a powerful force onstage. There are so many older artists that are still out there doing amazing work. Gary Numan’s most recent album “Savage” is possibly his best work ever. Killing Joke’s last album is just so good too. There are so many great bands here in northern California too, in and out of the goth scene. Believe me, I could go on and on.

What non-musical things inspire your music?

James: My songwriting tends to be autobiographical, so a lot of what’s inspired my writing has been my own life experiences. I occasionally get inspired just watching films or shows, sometimes I’ll hear a snippet of the soundtrack and think “what if they went THIS way instead of that way?” I find film soundtracks very inspiring anyway.

Is there a place where you go to be inspired?

James: Michelle and I are fortunate enough to be homeowners, and she loves working on the house. She’s making it a space where we can both be inspired to create.

What’s been the greatest achievement of your band?

James: We’re a very new band, so at this point it was just getting our first album finished in such a short time! We’ve only been a band since February 2019. In July, we did a brief tour with our friends 13th Sky, and I really wanted us to have our album finished and ready to sell for those shows. It took one hell of a lot of time and effort from everyone to get there, but we did it!

Where was the coolest place to play? Where did you enjoy yourselves the most?

James: Every show is fun in its own way! As of today, we’ve only played nine shows as a band. I think the coolest place we’ve played so far was Batcave S.F., held at the Knockout on Mission Street in San Francisco. It was wild! Lots of cool bands, drag performers, an awesome crowd… I think the most fun I’ve had at a show so far was the time we played Powerhouse Pub in Folsom on a Wednesday night. We had a decent turnout for playing late on a weeknight, and the club’s got great sound and a nice big stage which is always inspiring, and even though it was late and hot and we were all tired, we were just ON that night. Looking forward to more shows!

What are your favorite horror movies?

James: I enjoy the classics. Dracula. Frankenstein. Nosferatu. I just love the imagery and craftsmanship of those early films and what they were able to do with limited technology. Michelle showed me “Shadow of the Vampire”, a horror film about the filming of Nosferatu and I thought that was really great. I’m not into any slasher stuff, give me something atmospheric and psychological, not blood and guts. Michelle’s a huge fan of vampire films and has a massive collection. She’s also a huge fan of the Hannibal and Penny Dreadful TV series, and we’re both looking forward to the new Penny Dreadful City of Angels.

What was the scariest night of your life?

James: Maybe scary isn’t the right word, but the night I flew to New Zealand, unannounced, to ask Michelle to marry me was pretty nerve-wracking! I was so nervous she’d figure out what I was up to. But somehow I pulled off the surprise!

If you could play anywhere in the world, where would it be and who would be your opening band?

James: Anywhere and everywhere! I live for this stuff. I played in Guadalajara, Mexico as a fill-in guitarist with 13th Sky earlier this year and that was the wildest show of my life, such passionate music fans down there! I’d love to get Ashes Fallen down there as well. I also really hope we get to play in New Zealand some day so Michelle’s old friends can see her owning the stage! As for an opening act? We love it when we get to play shows with our friends. Maybe for my birthday one year I’ll set up a big show and have us and all our friends’ bands play.

What are you working on now for future release?

James: We’re pretty fully engrossed in playing live right now, but we do hope to have a new EP or single out early next year. I’m writing a few riffs here and there and thinking about which old, unfinished songs I’d like to try to explore with this band; believe me, I’ve got a ton of them! I wrote a lot of the songs on our debut album myself before we were a band, so I’m definitely looking forward to us doing more writing as a team. We’ve also been talking about putting together a proper music video for one of our songs, so watch out for that! We’ll be sharing more video footage from our live shows as well.

Final Thoughts / Anything you want to tell the listeners?

James: Go out to a show! There are so many great local, national, and international bands out in the clubs giving it their all to half-empty clubs that are struggling to keep their doors open. I love seeing shows and playing live so much and I don’t want it to die out completely.

Terror Trax: SINthetik Messiah

Band Name: SINthetik Messiah

Members: Bug Gigabyte is the only member; drums,
keyboard, guitar, vocals, programming, writing lyrics, and sound design.
Everyone else who has been apart of this project was a
temporary collaboration, especially for live shows.

Album/Song/Tour we are excited about right now.

I’m excited for my next release on the 13th “Black Sheep (Feat Hart Fortenbery )”

What singers or bands inspired you growing up?

Portishead, Nine Inch Nails, Orgy and Deadsy

Who are your favorite artists today?

I have so many today, and their styles can range from classical to hardcore drum and bass.

What non-musical things inspire your music?

This question can be loaded. However, emotions and people are non-musical sources of inspiration. What is the human condition? What is the human soul? How does it affect one another? How does it affect me? The propaganda of the new age and the people who blindly follow. Spiritually and the duality of it all.  What is real, what others define as real. Because there is more of the same answer by so many, Does it make it real or have we all been deceived to further divide us?  I’m not talking about religion, I’m talking about self. How far is it when it becomes selfish or selfless?

Is there a place where you go to get inspired?

Two places that really trigger my inspiration; going out and seeing a live show or going out in the middle of a forest with a tent, hand drum and making a big fire. Sometimes dancing around it helps.

What’s been the greatest achievement of your band?

I’ve had many achievements I’m very proud of, but when you see a class of children that are underfunded, and I’m able to provide art supplies or instruments to them, because our educational system is in the toilet here in Louisiana, that, I think is one of my biggest achievements.  The dramatic difference in their confidence and work when having the right tools makes it worth the countless hours and lack of sleep I’ve spent trying to raise money for them through my benefit television show.

Where was the coolest place to play? Where did you enjoy yourselves the most?

So far the first year I played Southern Gothic Fest.  It is what really helped me spread the word of Industrial Dubstep; what I’m known for creating.  This was the first time I’ve ever played in the goth scene. This was something I’ve always dreamed about when I was a kid, because the city I’m from there is no goth scene.

What are your favorite horror movies?

Hellraiser.  The thought of a dimensional being who is into some really kinky dominatrix stuff that has no safe word is really terrifying.  haha

What was the scariest night of your life?

The only thing you have to fear is fear itself. The Boat Man and I are friends.

If you could play anywhere in the world, where would it be and who would be your opening band?

I want to play in Ibiza on the beach, on a full moon with Fever Ray and Dead Can Dance. I would have more of a tribal electronic witch set planned out…only meant for that one show.

What are you working on now for future release?

I just finished reworking a track for The Other La, that was originally produced by CJ Pierce of Drowning Pool.  It should be out in a couple of months.  Now I’m working on my first full-length album that will feature the vocals of Ms Cat Hall.

Final thoughts / Anything you want to tell the listeners?

First I want to thank HorrorAddicts.net for being so kind to me, and I want to thank the people who listen to my work.  It does mean the world to me. My love and respect goes out to all of you.

http://www.sinthetikmessiah.bandcamp.com

http://www.twitter.com/buggigabyte

http://www.instagram.com/sinthetikmessiah_official/

 

 

Terror Trax: I Ya Toyah

Band Name: I Ya Toyah

I am One Woman Army, Ania Tarnowska:
lyrics/composition, recording, production, vocals, guitar, keyboards

Website: iyatoyah.com

What singers or bands inspired you growing up?

Opeth, Iron Maiden, Nine Inch Nails

Who are your favorite artists today?

I have a lot of favorite artists, varying in styles and it’s impossible to state just one as it’s endless list of talent I admire every day.

What non-musical things inspire your music?

Observation, conversation, nature

Is there a place where you go to be inspired?

It is a Forest with a Bit of the Light- a spot in the woods not far from where I live. I named it myself but it’s my to-go place when I seek mental relaxation and peace.

What’s been the greatest achievement of your band?

I’ve been honored to share the stage with Mortiis during his North American Tour, as well as with Grendel. I had a pleasure working with Rhys Fulber and have him remix one of my songs, “Flashback.” Mostly though, I feel the greatest achievement is to be a part of the amazing industrial electronic scene – it is a priceless experience.

Where was the coolest place to play? Where did you enjoy yourselves the most?

I love playing at Crucible, Madison WI. I adore their stage, sound and green room plus hospitality and vibes of everyone…I love Reggies rock club in Chicago and really enjoyed playing at The Forge, Joliet. Another amazing place I cannot wait to return to is Club Anything, Milwaukee WI. Owner Todd is a sweetheart and the place has a certain magic that feeds you with very positive energy.

What are your favorite horror movies?

I love Strangers. It is more of a thriller but I like the authenticity of the plot. Psycho is another good one. Anything Hitchcock and David Lynch.

What was the scariest night of your life?

I was 12 and was on my way back from music school ( I studied guitar, piano, and vocal performance). My dad drove the car and we got into an accident. I remember being terrified that he will die…I ended up being the one that almost did- but I don’t remember it as I was already in a coma. The fear of losing my dad and having to tell my mom about it was paralyzing.

If you could play anywhere in the world, where would it be and who would be your opening band?

I’d love to play at the venue called Dalhalla in Sweden. It is built on the rocks and shaped like an amphitheater. The setting in nature is absolutely magic and so is the sound. It is on my bucket list and as far as an opener/lineup goes, I don’t even know as there are many logistics involved, some of which would probably be out of my control.

What are you working on now for future release?

Currently, I’m working on releasing the remix of Puppet song done by Adoration Destroyed. Together with Lumbra Records we are filming and putting a dark-themed video for that song. I’m very excited as the remix is amazing!

Final thoughts.

I want to thank you for your support! You coming out to my live shows and supporting my releases makes what I do possible. I love you! ♥

Terror Trax: PORN the band

Band Name: PORN 

Members/ What instrument they play.

Philippe Deschemin aka Mr Strangler : Vocals, guitar, basse, synthetiser

Who writes your lyrics?

I do, Philippe aka Mr Strangler. Our current album, The Darkest of Human Desires – Act II  February 2019,  is the second part of a trilogy. The Ogre Inside – Act I is an album about inner struggle, about dark desires, how society can opresses your will. This is a fight no one can win, the Ogre that devours you from the inside always wins. The album is an invocation, a way to set the Ogre free, embrace your ”true-self” and allow your darkest desires to express themselves. It’s an incitement to act.

In this trilogy, The Ogre Inside won this inner struggle, giving birth to Mr Strangler.
In the Act II : The Darkest of Human Desires, Mr  Strangler, by embracing his “true-self “, expresses his dark impulses without limitations and has no boundaries.  With his crew, Mr Strangler commits murders and massacres. He  also invites everyone to make a step forward and act, invites you to express your darkest desires and join his death cult. For Mr Strangler and his team, the Ogre is released! Let the massacre begin!  Let the darkest of human desires be: murder.

I am working on whats happening in the Act III, maybe the final act! But I can’t tell more about it…
We are working on a possible comic book based on Mr Strangler and his crew.
I am a writer too, wrote a syfy novel and short stories. I am working on a new novel, a prequel of my first novel: Contoyen. So, I love to create characters and build stories, even in my musical work.

Contact

https://www.facebook.com/porntheband

https://porntheband.bandcamp.com/

https://www.instagram.com/philippedeschemin/

What singers or bands inspired you growing up?

David Bowie,  Robert Smith ( The Cure ), Carl McCoy ( Fields of the Nephilim )

Who are your favorite artists today?

I have so many … Tool, Paradise Lost, The Cult, Fields of the Nephilim,

What non-musical things inspire your music?

Philosophy and psychology. The actual trilogy is all about psychology and philosophy.

Is there a place where you go to be inspired?

During my footing, I have sometimes good ideas! Sometimes!

What’s been the greatest achievement of your band?

Working with Tom Baker. The man worked on so great albums : The Downward Spiral – NIN, Antichrist Superstar – MM , Hellbilly Deluxe – Rob Zombie. We worked with Tom on the mastering of our current album: The Darkest of Human Desires – Act II.

Where was the coolest place to play? Where did you enjoy yourselves the most?

We only have played in regular venue, but we would love to play in a scary place ( castle , church…)

What are your favorite horror movies?

To many! Shining, White zombie, Carnival of Souls, Videodrome, 28 Days Later, The Fly, Dawn of the Dead,  The Thing, The Descent, Get Out

What was the scariest night of your life?

I think, this night is to come …

If you could play anywhere in the world, where would it be and who would be your opening band?

Maybe in a mythic place like Whisky a Gogo… I would love to open for Alice Cooper, Gun’s roses, The Cure…

What are you working on now for future release?

We are recording the third act of our current trilogy, to be released in 2020!

Final thoughts.

Thank you very much for the interest. We are  PORN, you are PORN!

Terror Trax: Schultz

Band Name: Schultz

Franz : Electronics and vocals

Guitarfox : Guitars and vocals

Sandy Dynamite : Live dance performance and vocals

Who writes your lyrics?

Franz for the most, Me (Guitarfox) for the last

Website

https://blcproductions.bandcamp.com/

FACEBOOK

https://www.facebook.com/SchultzNewAlbumSoon/

SOUNDCLOUD

https://soundcloud.com/schultz-shot-of-pain

 

Album/Song/Tour we are excited about right now.

Shot Of Pain by Schultz, the album we’re here to promote right now available since the 06th May on BLC Productions

What singers or bands inspired you growing up? Growing up ?

Well…  TV cartoons generics !

Who are your favorite artists today?

Us ! The other ones are already taken.

What non-musical things inspire your music?

Bondage SM and Satanism.

Is there a place where you go to be inspired?

The internet.

What’s been the greatest achievement of your band?

Finishing this album

Where was the coolest place to play? Where did you enjoy yourselves the most?

There was the Volume in Nice, a nice place for gigs, but it closed definitely.

What are your favorite horror movies?

Rocky Horror Picture Show, and Pink Flamingos

What was the scariest night of your life?

The night before the baccalaureate

If you could play anywhere in the world, where would it be and who would be your opening band?

Any stadium in the world, they all look the same, wherever the place… Ministry, Rammstein, Revco…

What are you working on now for future release?

Promoting our album. For the rest, we’ll see later.

Final thoughts / Anything you want to tell the listeners?

Listen to our album, and buy it if you like. We needs your support.

Terror Trax: Hands of Ruin

Band Name: Hands of Ruin

Colin Z. Robertson – composition and production

https://handsofruin.com

 

https://twitter.com/HandsOfRuin

https://www.facebook.com/handsofruinmusic/

https://handsofruin.bandcamp.com

 

Album/Song/Tour we are excited about right now.

Schism was released in 2017 and had been written over the previous five years, and was the result of trying to push myself to create something harsher and darker than I otherwise would.

What singers or bands inspired you growing up?

Autechre and Aphex Twin inspired me to make electronic music, and then discovering the Cold Meat Industry artists such as In Slaughter Natives, Arcana, Raison d’être and Desiderii Marginis inspired me to work on dark ambient and martial industrial music.

Who are your favorite artists today?

These days I listen to a lot of the same music I listened to when I was young, but also Triarii, Wappenbund, Of the Wand and the Moon, Wardruna, as well as more danceable industrial music such as Front Line Assembly and Haujobb.

What non-musical things inspire your music?

I’m fascinated by all sorts of non-musical sounds. Listening to engines and machinery, or natural sounds, and thinking about the processes that produced them, often gives me musical ideas. Beyond that, music for me is a way of talking about feelings that I don’t have the words to describe, or am too afraid to put into words.

Is there a place where you go to be inspired?

There’s something contemplative and slightly melancholic about watching the landscape go past on train journeys that I find often gets me thinking about how I’d write some music.

What’s been the greatest achievement of your band?

I was very proud to have remixed two of Jo Quail’s tracks. She’s a superb musician and both tracks are beautiful pieces of music, so it was an honour to do that and see them released: https://joquail.bandcamp.com/album/hands-of-ruin-remixes-2

Where was the coolest place to play? Where did you enjoy yourselves the most?

I rarely play live, but I played at an art gallery in under some Victorian railway arches some years ago, so I was playing in a dungeon-like environment – all old brick, dust and cobwebs. It felt like the perfect setting for my music.

What are your favorite horror movies?

Nightbreed, The Company of Wolves, Alien, The Cabinet of Dr Caligari, The Fly

If you could play anywhere in the world, where would it be and who would be your opening band?

Playing live is not something that I particularly aspire to. I’m very content to make music in my bedroom. I’m not a performer. But if I were to play live then I’d want to turn the question around: who would I like to open for? It would be an honour to open for In Slaughter Natives, for example.

What are you working on now for future release?

I’m writing a soundtrack for Murnau’s Nosferatu. It’s still early days, but I’d certainly like to have it done in time for the film’s hundredth anniversary in 2022.

Anything you want to tell the listeners?

Thanks for taking the time to listen!

Terror Trax: Jon O’Bergh

Band Name: Jon O’Bergh

Members/ What instrument they play.

Jon O’Bergh / keyboards

Who writes your lyrics?

Jon O’Bergh (although many of my albums are instrumental)

https://obergh.net

Twitter: @jon_obergh

Facebook

YouTube

 

Album/Song/Tour we are excited about right now.

Ghost Story (album):  “Catacombs / Appian Way” (song)

 

What singers or bands inspired you growing up?

Meshell Ndegeocello, Tori Amos, Steely Dan, Jethro Tull, Nine Inch Nails, Herbie Hancock

Who are your favorite artists today?

Janelle Monae, Todrick Hall, Beck, Little Dragon

What non-musical things inspire your music?

Horror movies, ghost stories, science fiction

Is there a place where you go to be inspired?

Nowhere in particular.

What’s been the greatest achievement of your band?

Getting to meet horror director Guillermo del Toro and sharing with him a copy of the album Ghost Story.

Where was the coolest place to play? Where did you enjoy yourselves the most?

Playing on top of a mountain. This was with the band I had in college. We had to load our equipment into a gondola which ascended to the peak and swung in the wind. But the most enjoyable gig was playing for the Special Olympics. I’ve never experienced a more appreciative, enthusiastic audience.

What are your favorite horror movies?

The Conjuring. The Others, with Nicole Kidman. And two foreign movies: a Thai movie titled Shutter and the Japanese classic Onibaba.

What was the scariest night of your life?

Late one October night coming home from a gig. I parked the car and struggled to unload my synthesizer while the dry, demonic Santa Ana winds gusted. I was completely unaware that a few yards away from me, a serial killer crouched waiting to murder his next victim. The next day we found out he had broken into that neighboring apartment and murdered a young woman as she came home from a party.

If you could play anywhere in the world, where would it be and who would be your opening band?

I’d like to play in the ruins of an ancient coliseum. My opening band would be Little Dragon.

What are you working on now for future release?

I recently completed an album of horror-themed songs written by one of the characters in a companion horror novel. Each song represents a classic horror character: zombie, vampire, witch, etc. The album will be released in tandem with the publication of the novel.

Final thoughts / Anything you want to tell the listeners?

My albums span a variety of musical styles. The albums I think will especially interest patrons of Horror Addicts are 1) Specters of Twilight, an experimental electronic album inspired by Nine Inch Nails; 2) Tales from the Underground Bazaar, a collection of strange, true stories reminiscent of Laurie Anderson; and 3) Ghost Story, featured here.

Terror Trax: Laang 冷

Laang 冷
(Pronounced similar to “Long”).
Taohai Yang – all instruments, vocals, and lyrics
https://laang.bandcamp.com/

 

Album/Song/Tour you are excited about right now.     

We are doing an album release tour through Asia in June 2019!

What singers or bands inspired you growing up?

The bands Alcest, Harakiri for the Sky, and Chthonic most influence the music of Laang. However, my longest-running influences, in general, have been Tool, Radiohead, and Bach.

Who are your favorite artists today?

Bands like Alcest, Agrypnie, Sylvaine, and Woods of Ypres.

What non-musical things inspire your music?

My experience I had when I was shot. This is the main inspiration for the music of Laang. After being shot, I experienced something that I consider similar to an afterlife. It was like a universe that was infinite, but nothing was physical, including myself; I was infinite in the universe. There was no light, dark, up, down, anything like that. This was something that didn’t comply by the limitations of what the human mind can perceive. I find it difficult to describe, as our own rationality limits what we can understand, let alone describe it in words. But this was a world beyond description. And in it I was completely isolated. An infinite universe for an eternity, and I was the only presence. That type of isolation is crushing. Numbing. And yet, even with this feeling of isolation, I had a gnawing feeling that I was somehow unsafe. That I was being watched or pursued. This grew into a fear beyond words, a debilitating fear. It is this fear that inspires the music of Laang.

Is there a place where you go to be inspired?

It is such a potent memory that I feel like I don’t require much prompting to be inspired. I have constant reminders every day as I still continue my healing. When I want to write music or lyrics, I only have to sit down and do it, and it seems to just come to me. It’s rarely if ever forced. I almost hear what I want to write in my head, and I simply transcribe what I’m hearing before the thought evades me. In that sense, the composition process for Laang has always been quite efficient.

What’s been the greatest achievement of your band?

Well, we haven’t been around very long, but I suppose I am very proud of the fact that in only 6 months of being a band we have entered a record deal with one of our favourite labels, have scheduled a tour, and have had such a strong and welcoming reception from critics and fans alike. I am just so grateful for how things have gone so far.

Where was the coolest place to play? Where did you enjoy yourselves the most?

Laang hasn’t played any shows yet, but I’ve been in bands in the past. One of the coolest places I’ve played was on a barge in a lake. I’ve always loved the water, so playing in the middle of the water was a very cool experience for me.

What are your favorite horror movies?

This is a tough question, because I feel like there are elements that I love and hate in all horror movies. Usually I am bothered by contrived clichés and lackluster acting, but am a fan of the concept. I think that the film that I enjoyed the concept of the most was Sinister, simply because the idea of photos & videos moving, watching you, or having sentience is quite an alarming one, one that I remember fearing quite a lot as a child. I think that this was an interesting approach to this concept.

What was the scariest night of your life?

Bleeding in a parking garage, being in so much pain and lost so much blood that my whole body was paralyzed, cold, and numb. And remembering the sensation of blood slipping out of my mouth.

If you could play anywhere in the world, where would it be and who would be your opening band?

I would love to play on a boat. Perhaps in the North Sea off the coast of Iceland. Perhaps even just Iceland itself. Iceland is a hauntingly beautiful country with a landscape so alien and desolate. I find it one of the most visually inspiring and tranquil places on earth.

What are you working on now for future release?

Our digital album was released in December, and the physical digipak release is coming in May or June. I am focusing on working with the label to finish that first physical release. However, I wrote 2 new songs last week, so I would say that our second album is beginning to take shape. The sound of this album will be much in the same vein as the first, if not somewhat more depressive.

Final thoughts:

If you think that Laang sounds interesting, or you would like to hear more of the music then I would encourage you to find us online, check out the music, and spread the word. The more people that want Laang to play live in your city, the more likely we are to be booked on a tour there, which means we can come say hi and perform for you. I’m immensely appreciative of the support we have received so far and am looking forward to connecting with more of you in the future. Thank you so much.

https://www.facebook.com/LaangOfficial

https://www.instagram.com/laangblackmetal/

 

Chilling Chat: Episode 165 David Leinweber

chillingchat

David Leinweber is a historian with over 25 years of experience in the college classroom. He has published numerous articles, reviews, essays, and academic reference worksDavid Leinweber (including works on folklore, the occult, mythology, magic, and religion.) Dr. Leinweber is also a lifelong guitarist and pianist whose music has been featured in numerous venues, ranging from festivals and clubs to television, radio, theaters, and art galleries.

David is an amazing professor and an accomplished musician. We spoke of horror, inspiration, and the legacy of Dracula.

NTK:  Welcome to Chilling Chat, David. Thank you for chatting with me today. Could you tell us about A Song of Dracula? What is it about?

DL: A Song of Dracula is a romantic musical, loosely based on the classic 1897 novel by Bram Stoker, and also Jane Eyre.  It features a collection of original spooky songs, along with a few tavern singalongs.

It is about a young girl named Madeleine who arrives as a governess at a great estate in England, like Jane Eyre.  There is a romantic interest with the head of the estate (also like Jane Eyre).  However, witchcraft, vampirism, and a ghost enter into the story.  I really wanted it not to be gory or sensationalistic, however—no hissing or blood.  It’s a romantic story.

NTK: What inspired you to write this musical?

DL: Well, I’ve been a lifelong horror fan, especially of the old Victorian novels like Carmilla and Dracula, as well as the classic horror films.  I wanted this to be a production that evoked the romance and the historical/geographical settings of the old films, especially Hammer Films.  I also wanted it to be something that could range in targeted audiences from adult theater groups to community or high-school productions.

Interestingly, the word vampire does not appear in the story, though it’s obvious that is what is going on.

NTK: How much research went into A Song of Dracula? Did you try to incorporate songs appropriate to the time period?

DL: I would say that the play/musical reflects my long interest in horror, romance and gothic lit, if not flat-out research.  I did try to evoke spooky songs that have the spirit of a gothic estate.  There are also some tavern tunes that would be good for sailors or other port-city type characters right out of central casting (Laughs.)  However, I think the songs could be interpreted in a number of different ways.  I mostly envision them as spooky, romantic ballads.  But several could be done in a range of styles, including a few that could be hard-rock with electric guitar, and a light show.  I think a lot would depend on the director’s ideas.  For me, though, it’s a romantic Victorian gothic story, first and foremost.

NTK:  What do you think the attraction to Dracula is? Why does he have such a lasting legacy?

Bela LugosiDL: Great question.  I certainly think one could point to the classic psychological themes, like the fear of death, or subliminal sexual desires.  I also think that a good vampire story often has a folklore quality to it, and evokes a sense of being bound in time.  I sometimes think the classic elements of the Dracula tale don’t appear as much in vampire stories of the present-day when so many film studios want to update the classic elements.  Call it cliche if you want, but some of the classic horror tropes were very powerful and we should try to transmit them to the next generation.

NTK:  How did you discover horror? How old were you?

DL: Pretty young.  There was a guy on TV in Detroit when I was a kid called Sir Graves Ghastly—a Saturday matinee movie host who came out of a coffin hosted old horror movies, told bad horror jokes, read kids’ birthday cards, and all that.  I used to watch him every Saturday.  I remember all the “House of” horror movies he showed, which were truly classics, among many others.  I also was a big Dark Shadows fan, though pretty young at the time.

NTK: Do you have a favorite horror film?

DL: Another great question.  Hard to answer though (Laughs.)  I actually like some of the quiet, spooky films like Let’s Scare Jessica to Death.  But I think the Hammer films are my favorite, especially the three horror films they did that were loosely based on CarmillaThe Vampire Lovers, To Love a Vampire.  There was something special about the horror films of the late sixties and early seventies—it was still the hippie era, with all the creativity and mood that came out of it.  The fact that there were Drive-in Movies back then also created a big demand for lots of movies.  They weren’t all exactly Citizen Kane or The Godfather, but they were usually pretty fun to watch, and often surprisingly good.  That was also before Star Wars came out, which changed Hollywood into more of a Blockbuster mindset and the tasteful little movies, including B films and Drive-in Movie titles, became less common.

NTK: As a musician, did you find these soundtracks inspiring?

DL: Yes, a lot of those films had fine soundtracks.  The film I mentioned Let’s Scare Jessica to Death, in particular, had a really distinct soundtrack— quiet piano and flutes and guitar lines that really created that sense of loneliness, haunted locales, and, towards the end, isolation and fear.  That soundtrack really gave that sense of going back in time.  The Hammer Film, Lust for a Vampire, also had a really strange, very ‘sixties’ sounding tune—“Strange Love.”  It’s almost comical to watch it today because it can seem dated and out of place in the film, but it was actually a pretty eerie musical effect.

NTK: Who do you think portrayed the best Dracula?

DL: Of course, I like the Lugosi and Lee Draculas.  But Lon Chaney also did a good job and John Carradine.  But a sometimes underrated and/or less noted version was the Frank Langella 1979 Dracula, a very fine production.

NTK:  Do you have a favorite horror novel?

DL: Well, I guess the obvious choices would be Dracula and Carmilla.  But beyond those two classics, I remember that Stephen King’s Salem’s Lot really scared the heck out of me when I first read it, along with the 1979 miniseries.  When I was a kid, I used to read a lot of the cheap paperback horror novels, too, though I don’t have time for that anymore and I’m not sure if there is as big a market for them as there used to be.  Horror novels were kind of like horror movies.  They made a lot of them, which meant that there were often some quite good ones mixed in with others that weren’t’ so good, but it was always fun to read through the find the gems.

NTK: Do you think there’s any truth to be found in the folklore surrounding vampires? Do you think there are personalities who could be considered vampiric?

DL: Another great question.  Well, I certainly can see how the folklore had its roots—all the classic fears of premature burial, blood-borne diseases, or wasting away.  I also think the classic vampire motif that mixes terrible fear with desire is very powerful, for everybody.

And yes, I do think there are people who could be considered vampiric.  Not sure I want to give any names (Laughs.)  I think there are people who have a way of draining your energy and vitality.  They get stronger and richer, while you get weaker, more uncertain, and lose your zest for life.  But I guess the most classic vampire is a romantic attraction, and sometimes even kind of tragic and sad in the way they kill what they love.

NTK: David, what does the future hold for A Song of Dracula? Where can Horror Addicts see the musical? And, do you have any other upcoming horror projects?

DL: Well, I’m really hoping to have a good theater production do the musical.  Of course, Dark ShadowsI’d even love to have it turned into a film.  But first and foremost, it’s a theatrical production.  I’m still working on finding the right theater to debut the show, but hopefully soon.  I also enjoy writing ghost songs and am compiling a list of ghost songs to release as a song cycle.  My song “Daphne,” about the Kate Jackson character Daphne Harridge on Dark Shadows, remains my favorite song and it was the ghost song I wrote that got me the most inspired along these musical and storytelling lines.  Kate Jackson loves the song, which was encouraging.

NTK: Thank you so much for joining me, David. It’s not often we gain insight from an awesome educator like yourself.

DL: Thanks again for your interest in my musical and thoughts about horror.

Terror Trax: David Leinweber

David Leinweber
Guitar, Piano, Lyricist
https://www.facebook.com/david.leinweber.73

Album/Song/Tour you are excited about right now.

I played some of my ghost songs like “Daphne and Little Sarah” at the Popular Culture Association Annual Meeting in Washington D.C. in April.

What singers or bands inspired you growing up?

I grew up listening to Eric Clapton, Cat Stevens, and hard rock like Led Zeppelin, Deep Purple, and Mott the Hoople.  I was also raised in Detroit and love a good bar band.

Who are your favorite artists today?

I think some of the best music today, that I come across, is in films.  I enjoyed “Shallow” by Brad Cooper and Lady Gaga.

What non-musical things inspire your music?

Movies, books, memories of people and past times, history.

Is there a place where you go to be inspired?

Detroit, Spain, and long walks.

What’s been the greatest achievement of your band?

When Kate Jackson, the star of Dark Shadows who played the beautiful ghost Daphne Harridge, called to tell me how much she loved my song “Daphne”.  We talked for about thirty minutes. She told me a lot of inside stores about the old Dark Shadows show and some of the stars.  She loved the song Daphne and said it really captured the spooky, atmospheric, romantic nature of the character.

Where was the coolest place to play? Where did you enjoy yourselves the most?

Also, I was invited two times to perform as the Flatpicking Professor in Scotland for the Scottish Bluegrass Association.

What are your favorite horror movies?

The Vampire Lovers with Madeleine Smith, Dracula with Frank Langella, The Wicker Man, and almost anything by the old Hammer studios.

What was the scariest night of your life?

Walking home from partying at a friend’s house after seeing the Salem’s Lot TV miniseries.

If you could play anywhere in the world, where would it be and who would be your opening band? 

An English pub with Eric Clapton.

What are you working on now for future release?

I’m hoping to get my musical Dracula finished and done.  Also, I’m working on a new cycle of story songs.

Final thoughts:

It’s all about the song, and every song has a story.

 

Chilling Chat with Harry Husbands

chillingchat

Harry Husbands spends the majority of his day in an office. In the evening, he writes furiously all the disturbed imaginings dwelled upon while completing banal admin tasks.Harry Husbands He crafts tales with subtle terror that are dipped in humor and roasted slowly over an infectious passion for all things horror related. He also performs and records songs from his house in Peterborough, England.

Harry is an unassuming, gentleman of horror. We spoke of writing, inspirations, and influences. 

NTK: Welcome to Chilling Chat, Harry! Thank you for chatting with me today.

HH: No problem at all, Naching. Thanks for having me.

NTK: How old were you and what was the first thing that got you interested in horror?

HH: It’s hard to say exactly what age it was because I always remember being interested in horror. A very early memory is going to—what we would call—a fancy dress shop around Halloween time. I was so intrigued by the scary masks and props.

NTK: Did you like horror movies as a kid?

HH: I loved horror movies as a kid, even though they’d give me nightmares. I was scared of a lot of things, but I was equally fascinated. I watched The Exorcist when I was quite young after begging my parents. I couldn’t sleep for many nights afterward, but it was worth it.

NTK: Did this love of horror movies and horror lead to writing? Why did you start writing horror?

HH: Absolutely. I was massively into Goosebumps—as most other wee ones were at the time—and I thought the idea of being a writer was really cool which probably tells you a lot about the kind of kid I was. My Nan had an old typewriter and I got to work on my first novel. It was about being stranded at sea and surrounded by all kinds of monsters. I think it ended up being three pages long but I was hooked on the notion of being able to create my own scary stories. The fact that I could weave creepy tales from my own noggin was addictive.

NTK: You’re an accomplished musician and songwriter. How does this talent transfer to your writing?

HH: It’s all about manipulating the form to try and evoke an emotional reaction from the listener or reader. They’re completely different ways of doing it, but the basic idea is the same. In music, you can use a dissonant chord, or a slightly out of tune note; in writing, you can use a well-placed adjective or a short, punchy sentence. A lot of my songs tend to end up as stories, and two of the albums I’ve done have been concept albums. I guess storytelling is just a part of who I am.

NTK: Do you have a muse?

HH: I don’t have a muse—not in particular anyway. It sounds like a cop-out answer, but I’m inspired by so many things it’s hard to pin it on just one.

NTK: Where do your ideas come from? Do they just come to you out of the blue? Do you dream them? Or both?

HH: Everywhere and anywhere. We live in a fascinating world, in fascinating—and scary—times, so there’s plenty of places to pick ideas from. I’ll have a bunch go through my head and it’s about picking a good one then nurturing, feeding, and burping it; eventually, it will become something bigger and often completely different from the initial image or thought that entered my head.

NTK: How did your story,“Goose Meadows,” from Campfire Tales come about?

HH: Like most story ideas I’ve had, it came partly from a real-life situation and partly from the dark place in my brain where all the horror I’ve absorbed lurks and festers. Goose Meadows is a real place, not far from where I live, and I did drunkenly walk around it at night time after someone’s 18th birthday party. I didn’t come across anything eerie or supernatural, only a large amount of litter. Throw it in the dang trash, folks.

NTK: That’s amazing you came up with this story from such a mundane incident. Do you exert much control over your characters? Do they have free will?

HH: I’m definitely a seat-of-the-pants writer so I have little control. I don’t plan anything other than a very basic premise for the story; it’s up to them how it turns out.

NTK: You wrote “Goose Meadows” for the Next Great Horror Writer Contest. Did you enjoy the contest? What was your overall experience?

HH: There were elements of the contest I enjoyed very much, and other elements I didn’t enjoy so much. I had only just begun to take writing seriously when I entered so it was eye-opening, for sure. I started to realise just how many writers there were in the world all doing exactly the same thing as me, and that’s equally inspiring and kind of soul-crushing in a way. I suddenly didn’t feel like I was doing anything that was worth selling to a publisher. I have never had much confidence in myself and that made it difficult for me. After either not hearing anything about something I wrote on the podcast, or having negative comments, I started to try and tailor my later pieces so they would do well in the contest which was a big mistake. What’s so great about fiction is that every writer has something unique to bring to the table, based on their own lives, and I think I should have stuck to what makes me unique rather than trying to fit into what might get me some good feedback or better points.

NTK: What do you think makes a good Campfire Tale?

HH: It has to be scary. Simple as that. It’s the only reason people actually do the whole campfire tale thing—they want to be scared. Annoyingly, as a writer, that’s one of the hardest things to do.

NTK: What authors have influenced you?

HH: So many! As I mentioned the Goosebumps books earlier, I’d have to say R.L Stine. The obvious answer, Stephen King. There’s also Shirley Jackson, M.R James, Adam LG Nevill, and many, many more.

NTK: You have a very dry wit and sense of humor. Do you enjoy comedic horror?

HH: I do, very much so. They’re my two favourite genres combined. I love when I find comedic horror done right because I think it’s so hard to do. Being funny is tough, being scary is tough, being funny and scary is extremely difficult and rarely done right. It’s such a treat when it is, though.

NTK: Which horror/comedy movie is your favorite?

HH: It’s tough,campfiretalesfinal but I’d have to go with Shaun of the Dead.

NTK: Is that your favorite horror movie? What is your favorite?

HH: I’d say The Exorcist is my favourite. For me, it has yet to be beaten in terms of sheer terror.

NTK: Do you have a favorite horror TV show?

HH: I really loved the Masters of Horror series because I enjoyed seeing all of the director’s different styles.

NTK: Harry, what does the future hold for you? What do Addicts have to look forward to?

HH: I really have no idea what the future holds for me. I’m just gonna carry on creating in whatever capacity feels good to me. At the moment, I’m mostly into writing and recording music and might have some new songs uploaded soon. I should have a story coming out in a new anthology, hopefully early next year, that’s admittedly more bizarre than horror. I dunno, we’ll see!

NTK: Thank you for chatting with me today, Harry. It was fun.

HH: No need to thank me, Naching. It’s been fun for me too.

Addicts, you can find Harry on Twitter.

MUSIC REVIEW – Ein

Today we’re taking a look at the upcoming release “Lethargic Breakthrough” by French progressive black metal band Ein. Ein is a one-man band fronted by Nox, featuring multiple guest vocalists and a violinist to create their debut release. Taking a unique approach to the genre, Nox’s black metal release implicates elements of death metal, atmospheric ambience, noise, and syncopated rhythms and time signatures. These elements make this a standout release worth of any extreme metal fan’s catalogue.

While the release features non-traditional elements of melody and rhythm, it doesn’t make the music any less accessible. The guitar lines are memorable, abrasive but beautiful, and an overtone of melancholy hinges on the outskirts of this release’s horizons. In fact, a culminating, if not obligatory traditional French-style post-black metal and shoegaze song carries this album to a triumphant conclusion with the track “Momentum”. Nearly an Alcest shoutout, this track should ring strong to any newcomers to the genre and is strongly reminiscent of the iconic French black metal sound. The stark contrast between crushing heaviness, melancholic riffing, and even ambient electronic breaks keeps this release interesting and driving forwards without sinking into the trap of monotony that many amateur black metal musicians do.

Lethargic Breakthrough is available via Mourning Light Records on Halloween 2018.

For HorrorAddicts.net, this is Jeffrey Kohld Kelly

Ein online:

https://www.facebook.com/EinBlackMetal

Purchase Lethargic Breakthrough:

https://mourninglightrecords.com/shop?olsPage=products%2Fein-lethargic-breakthrough

Terror Trax: Zwaremachine

Saturday, October 6, 2018

6:36 P.M., Central Time

Minneapolis, Minnesota

Dear Emerian,

Please be advised, the Zwaremachine is extremely dangerous! During the course of our interview I learned that the musician in question, one Mach FoX, is in fact, himself, the Zwaremachine. It did not arrive by spaceship as he claims –it was already here! By combining inverted Atari algorithms with voodoo-tech spells and song craft, Mach FoX transformed into a highly malevolent human / machine hybrid who wishes for nothing less than the utter and total annihilation of the human race! Once the Zwaremachine realized my discovery, the Robot Vampire Zombie minions were released upon me and I was chased along the dark streets of the city until I took shelter in a long abandoned Radio Shack, which, as I unfortunately learned, was indeed haunted by the ghosts of obsolete technologies. After several frightful hours I made my escape and took refuge at an all-night diner where I write to you now from my trusty laptop machine. My safety may only be temporary, though, for I fear that I soon may be discovered.  You must publish this interview immediately and alert the Addicts of this grave danger! And remember: although the music of the Zwaremachine is very, very good, its intentions are not!

All of our hopes rest with you, dear Emerian! Godspeed!

R.


What is a Zwaremachine?

Hello and thank you to Horror Addicts for letting me expose the Zwaremachine to your rabid audience. The Zwaremachine arrived in a spaceship haunted by the ghost of a robot and responsible for reprehensible crimes throughout the galaxy, it is currently hiding out on earth in the form of an industrial/ebm band. Zwaremachine is known for various stunts including walking through walls, time-shifting, and designing futuristic sonic weaponry. It is a dark and dangerous bio-mechanical entity.

How did Zwaremachine get started?

In 2011 I wrote a track called “The Zwaremachine” which was inspired by the horror-fantasy world artwork of Paul Gerrard. I used the first person while writing the story and lyrics which involved a biomechanical entity coming to earth and imposing rule over mankind. I became The Zwaremachine. After all the sequencing and vocal mutations were done I decided to release it and form an electro-industrial band to perform live. 

There’s a rumor that you, as a band, have the knowledge to build robot zombies from old VCRs, discarded human remains, and ColecoVision game consoles. Is this true?

Yes…and unfortunately I was not able to maintain control of them and make them do my bidding. Most have escaped and are living in the shadows and in small groups in desolate areas though some are being spotted near cities recently. While programming them with the clock chips and crystals from the old VCRs they kept resetting to 00:00 every time they experienced a power dropout so I wasn’t able to implement the final coding before they escaped. This resulted in them still longing for blood and the taste of human flesh -particularly the brains- even though they do not need the blood or meat of humans to survive. They will attack and kill when they feel the pulse in their brains that makes these urges. I only hope that humanity can defend itself. Also – they are referred to as RZVs and they are actually robot zombie vampires and can fly. I went a bit overboard in the design. You have been warned.

 

Has modern / current electronic music become too electronic? With so much of the work being computer driven, has it lost more of the human element that earlier industrial or electronic music had?

I’m longing for a more cyberpunk take on music, instruments and technology. I prefer a more electronic approach without the hindrance of pesky humans. I see that as the way we can advance to a new style of music. A lot of earlier industrial music had this spirit and wasn’t driven by the past but looking to the future and the undiscovered territory music could explore and exploit. Provoking thought and action can stimulate new sounds. We have to smash and destroy the old instruments and techniques to form new alliances between machines, music, and man. Machines must become man and man must become machines. Blood, Sweat, and Gears!

Make people dance, fill them with fear, or both?

Ideally they would be driven to dance by the minimal hypnotic industrial body music of Zwaremachine and as they reach a trance state they will slowly realize they are being forced to dance until they collapse and die. That realization will fill them with fear as they dance their lives away… so I guess it’s the best of both worlds!

When making dark industrial music, who is in control, the musician or the machine?

Aaahhh -the old man versus machine battle! The machines only let me feel that I am in control and it’s an ongoing tug of war for the ultimate power when using them. It is man AND machine, not one or the other. With Zwaremachine I was able to make a deal with the machines early on in the songwriting process. They agreed to let me manipulate waveforms and timing events but insisted that they be interconnected via musical instrument digital interface and control voltages. I knew this would be a bad idea because they would be able to communicate amongst themselves by both digital and analog means and possibly rebel against and subvert my mission to harness them to make industrial/ebm music to hypnotize the masses. So far they have been compliant but as a fan of horror/sci-fi I know it’s only a matter of time…

How can we taste everything? Is this a direct command or just good advice?

This is a warning about the RZVs (robot zombie vampires) and also a command to help human kind to survive. By suggesting they also try the leg or arm of a victim the person under attack may be able to escape or fend off and continue living only missing a limb…or two, with the brain still intact. For the RZVs it starts with a pulse in their brain and the urge to consume human brains… but why stop there? Why not taste everything!

 For the uninitiated reader, can you please tell us about some of your influences and where you feel that Zwaremachine fits into the cannon of dark industrial music?

If you visit any of the artwork done by Paul Gerrard you will instantly recognize the deep vast darkness… that is where Zwaremachine dwells and extracts influence from. His artwork and the horror/sci-fi of the ages as well as technologies past, present, and future all inform the lyrics and worlds of where this music lives: When the rare bits of light trickle through you may get glimpses of biomechanical creatures, surreal machines and a very small bit of humanity that has stubbornly held on through the centuries.

What influence does horror have in Zwaremachine?

I am not familiar with the genre personally…but I know the RZVs like some classics like Nosferatu and Night of the Living Dead and I had even seen a couple of them crack smiles while watching Evil Dead. The Zwaremachine prefers body horror and sci-fi horror like Tetsuo, Videodrome, and Planet Terror…i think it relates to the human machine hybrid and longs to become more human. But that is just speculation as I am not currently connected via synapses with the Zwaremachine anymore since the release of the Be a Light album this year.

There’s a strong visual element with Zwaremachine, and a particularly hypnotic yet, some may say, anxiety inducing characteristic to your videos. Could you please tell us about the inspiration behind this imagery?

Prior to Zwaremachine I was performing in an electro-punk band as Mach FoX and before that an electro-glam band called Silver FoX. Custom stage sets, equipment, lighting, visuals and costumes had always been part of these shows and something I really cared about when presenting the music and the live shows. Much in the same way that lighting and atmosphere can make a scary movie evoke emotions and keep you enthralled, I wanted the people at the show to see something special, and to set the mood on stage. Around the same time I started Zwaremachine I started to work as a VJ (visuals) and also combine hardware and software to create video art that I could project and also display on CRTs. A lot of the second hand monitors, mixers, processors and other hardware was flawed and became a glitch aesthetic I could easily exploit. This type of glitch work was then incorporated into Zwaremachine live shows and the fast paced strobing and broken images matched the feel of the fight to harness these unruly machines.

What inspires you to create? What drives you to keep making music?

I have a special bond with machines. Using hardware sequencers and drum machines and editing grids has become a way of life. The timing and spacing of notes is both limited and endless. I still explore composition and songwriting as much as possible and base my output on the 10:1 rule that seems to hold true for me – write 10 songs and maybe one or two are pretty good. Since meeting and interfacing with the Zwaremachine I have had better success due to the involvement of off world technologies. The machines speak to me and sometimes I listen.

How is the industrial scene in Minneapolis these days?

We keep rolling on here… the Be a Light release came out about 6 months ago in May 2018 and I expect we will slowly gain some following locally. The next step needs to be some touring ASAP since I have played shows in MPLS all summer to gain exposure and have some offers to travel with the band. There are many musicians and friends who are into this music but the scene is spread thin with many nights and not a lot of cross promotion. I have been trying to propose a Midwest Industrial umbrella to promote all types of music genres across the Midwest US and in the Twin Cities but it has proved hard to kick start a scene. In some ways it’s like the first wave of industrial/ebm has finally hit the Midwest area so we will see what happens.

Are any of your electronic instruments cursed or possessed?

Oohh -Don’t say that! They probably are. I know a few have felt and tasted blood. I have a circuit bent Roland TR505 that most certainly has its moments of possession complete with demonic sounds, and some of the modular synths I use also can become uncontrollable at times.

What are the future plans for Zwaremachine?

As mentioned I will start to play outside of the Twin Cities more next year and have plans to release more music that has already been written but not yet recorded. I have been performing each show this fall as a unique set with some great friends, musicians and vocalists as guests. I will also continue to collaborate on some recordings and seek other non-traditional venues to perform at and hope to mutate some minds.

When the world is destroyed by humanity, will the Zwaremachine remain?

Yes. If you do not know by now…the Zwaremachine is what WILL destroy humanity!

How can we keep up with / contact the band?

If you need to report any RZV sightings please use the OFFICIAL website:

http://www.zwaremachine.band/

If you want to stream/dl Zwaremachine visit:

https://zwaremachine.bandcamp.com/

If you want to impress your friends, you can get exciting updates here: https://www.facebook.com/zwaremachine

If you want to order Zwaremachine CD/Cassette/Shirts/Posters visit our label Phage Tapes 

@zwaremachine on both twitter and Instagram

Dear readers, please check out the official Zwaremachine video, “DRKNRG”, here:

MUSIC REVIEW – Empathy Test

By Jeffrey Kohld Kelly

After just completing a successful UK tour, it seems all to right to take a look at London synthpop artist Empathy Test’s remastered album “Losing Touch”. Empathy Test is not a newcomer to the electronic scene by any means, but their novel mainstream recognition within various electronic subcultures arguably happened overnight. The nostalgic and dreamy synth lines have gathered fierce attention from ravers and industrial rivetheads alike, each respectively identifying with some captivating aspect of this band’s truly panoramic discography.

To pin this band to a singular genre would be a disservice to the musicians and fans alike; drawing noted influence from post-punk and new wave artists, Empathy Test stands tall in a classification of their own, standing out proudly against other bands who simply fall into the category of new wave revival. Not a revival band in the slightest, Empathy Test’s music is charged with bright innovation, markedly with vocalist Isaac Howlett’s gentle, songbird-style vocals. A complex, yet effective atmosphere compliments all of their songs, begging to not be confined to the restriction of headphones alone. Indeed, this music is something that deserves to be experienced to its full capacity live if at all possible.

I’ve been lucky enough to have a chance to hear the yet unreleased “Incubation Song” from Empathy Test’s upcoming EP at their live performance in Manchester England, and while I can’t share that song with you today I can promise you that you’ll love it. Building on their own musical concepts, Empath Test continues to innovate and reach to broader horizons with this upcoming release, and we can see nothing but the best for them.

You can pre-order Empath Test’s upcoming EP “Holy Rivers | Incubation Song” featuring remixes by The New Division and Man Without Country on their Bandcamp profile. The EP will be released worldwide on Halloween, 2018.

For HorrorAddicts.net, this is Jeffrey Kohld Kelly

Holy Rivers | Incubation Song on Bandcamp:

https://empathy-test.bandcamp.com/album/holy-rivers-incubation-song

Empathy Test online:

https://www.empathytest.com/

https://www.facebook.com/empathytest/

 

Chilling Chat Episode 160 Michele Roger

Michele Roger is an author and harpist living and working in Detroit. Her previous novel, The Conservatory, was published in 2014. Her second book, Eternal Kingdom: A Vampire Novel, was published in 2015 and made into a film script. Dedicated to furthering the reach of women in speculative fiction, she is a founding member of, “The Wicked Women Writer’s Group.” Her short stories have been published in anthologies in both the US and UK. As a harpist, she is the founder of the Michigan Conservatory. She was a Detroit Music Awards Finalist for best classical composer in 2015.

Michele is an innovative and artistic woman. We spoke of music, the creative process, and her advice for the burgeoning female writer.

NTK: Welcome to Chilling Chat, Michele! Thank you so much for chatting with me.

MR: I’m thrilled to be here. Thank you for the invite!

NTK: You’re an accomplished musician. How does your background in music influence your writing?

MR: That’s a great question. In reality, there isn’t an easy answer. The two creative outlets sometimes inspire one another. That’s when it feels like a blessing. I can be writing a conversation between two people falling for one another and the music will start to play in my head. The epiphany will hit me that it’s not a song I’ve heard before. Then, I stop writing words and start writing notes on a music paper. Sometimes, the two outlets compete for my attention. I can wake up at 3 am with a story and the theme music and the entire movie score in my head. Then, it feels like a curse. Which do you act upon first? Honestly, it’s a good problem to have.

NTK: Do you find inspiration in dreams?

MR: My biggest inspiration is walking. But, dreams do come into play. If I set a story and its characters aside to do my day job teaching music or playing Harp concerts, the characters sneak into my dreams. It’s always the same dream to start. I’m asleep in bed inside of a glass box. The characters come and gently knock on the box while I’m sleeping. The characters return each night, knocking louder and eventually pounding on the glass until I finally start to write their story. Then, the dreams end.

NTK: Did The Harpist come to you in this way?

MR: Yes. The ghost in the story, Emma, came to see me first, as I was out for a walk. That night, I dreamed of her outside the glass box. She scared the hell out of me. But as a paranormal writer, that’s an advantage, I suppose. Elizabeth and Detective Flannery came to me the next day.

NTK: That’s a fascinating process. What is the difference between paranormal and horror?

MR: Paranormal, by my definition, is like a flavor of a story. There are elements that are scary or ghostly but those elements are just tools for telling a story. The Harpist is definitely paranormal. I’ve written two horror novels. The entire story builds and builds becoming more frightening at every turn.

Paranormal uses scary elements to tell a great story. Horror uses a story to convey something really scary.

NTK: Are your stories character driven? Or, plot driven?

MR: Depends on the story. My sci-fi book, Dark Matter was definitely plot driven. So was [ ETERNAL KINGDOM: A VAMPIRE NOVEL Paperback ] Roger, Michele ( AUTHOR ) Jul - 20 - 2014 [ Paperback ]my horror novel, Eternal Kingdom. But my latest shorts, like Addicted to Love and now this new novel, The Harpist, is far more driven by the characters.

I think, as I get older, the more I like how beautiful it is when characters are vulnerable.

NTK: How much control do you exert over your characters after they come to you? Do they retain their free will? Do they come to you with vulnerabilities?

MR: They come to me dragging their huge amounts of baggage. It’s just my job to spoon their personality and flaws out to the readers as needed.

NTK: What writers have influenced you most?

MR: My first love of literature bloomed after reading F. Scott Fitzgerald. When I read that Hunter S. Thompson said he wrote passages from The Great Gatsby over and over again to learn how to write well, I tried it. That’s when I knew I wanted to write. I didn’t realize I wanted to write speculative fiction, sci-fi, and horror/paranormal until I devoured Stephen King’s short, Thinner. Then, The Visitor series in the 80s and finally, Margaret Atwood’s The Heart Goes Last, had me writing in the genre and never looking back.

NTK: Were you a reader as a child?

MR: I loved to read. It was always my escape.

NTK: What got you into horror?

MR: In 8th grade, a friend gave me a copy of Stephen King’s, The Eyes of the Dragon. It was a fantasy story he wrote for his daughter. I was already reading all the sci-fi and fantasy I could get my hands on secretly (my mom thought I should read romance) so King’s fantasy novel became my gateway drug into his other stories.

NTK: What do your parents think of your writing? Have they encouraged you?

MR: Before my dad passed away, he came to every signing and author event I had; often buying a copy of books he already had just to show his support. My mom is supportive of all my creative endeavors.

NTK: You said your mom wanted you to read romance. Do you like to write romantic scenes in your books?

MR: The first romantic scene I ever had to write, I was so nervous, I had to have a cocktail to get through it. Now, I have become much closer friends with my characters. I adore helping them find their loves. Maybe, that’s the difference between writing my first love scene in my early thirties and writing now at 46. I’m more comfortable with my own sexuality and hence, I’m more comfortable with the romance scenes of my characters.

NTK: That’s great! Do you enjoy horror movies and television shows? If so, which are your favorites?

MR: Hmm. I love Stranger Things but really, I don’t watch much TV or movies. I’m a print junkie.

NTK: What do you like about Stranger Things?

MR: I love the duality of worlds; one we can see, one only a select few can see. I also adore how much they’ve embraced the deliciousness of the 80s, right down to the plaid flannel shirts. Seeing the story through the eyes of kids is one of the best parts.

NTK: You’re a founding member of The Wicked Women Writer’s Group. Could you tell the Addicts how that came about?

MR: Early on in my writing, a publisher told me that it would be hard for him to market my work if I used my real name. Horror and sci-fi readers didn’t buy work written by women (or so he thought.) I didn’t want to hide behind a male pen name. Instead, I started a group for women who wrote speculative fiction. I wanted it to be a positive place for female horror writers to support one another. It’s become so much more and I couldn’t be more proud of all the members and our collaborations.

NTK: Very cool! Thank you for starting this group and giving women writers a place to get together. What advice would you like to give prospective women writers out there?

MR: Just this week, The Guardian published an interview with Phillip Pullman, author of His Dark Materials series, and president of a UK author society. He said that the publishing world isn’t supporting authors. Less than 30% of authors can make a living by writing solely as a career. For women, the percentage is even lower. Hence, my advice is this: 1. Buy the work of all authors you love. As a woman and a writer, we appreciate the grueling art form. Particularly, buy the work of female authors. Show appreciation with our dollars. 2. If monetary support is out of reach, support women’s writing by posting great reviews of their work. 3. Never give up on your dream.

NTK: Wonderful words! Michele, as you know, Season 13 of HorrorAddicts is CURSED! Do you have a favorite curse? If so, what is it?

MR: Curses are definitely a powerful female tool. My favorite thing about them is that they’re more frightening than a threat. A curse actually feels possible. My favorite curse? “I hope you have a kid just like you!” That curse came true in my two kids. And, I couldn’t be more proud.

NTK: What does the future hold for you? What books, stories, and music do HorrorAddicts have to look forward to?

MR: The Harpist (Cursed) will be released this fall 2018. A short holiday story with Elizabeth and Flannery is in the works and the sequel to The Harpist is already outlined and taking shape. As for music, I’m working on another Celtic harp album which will hopefully be released in the spring of 2019.

NTK: Thank you for chatting with me, Michele. It’s been fun.

MR: Thank you so much for the interview.

Addicts, you can find Michele on Twitter.

MUSIC REVIEW – Live show: Freakangel + Neonsol + Advance

Hello and welcome to HorrorAddicts.net music reviews! This is Jeffrey Kohld Kelly.

Today we are going to do something a little bit different; rather than reviewing a new release I’m going to do a review of the Manchester date of the Freakangel & Neonsol show featuring Advance. This tour was courtesy of Beat:Cancer, a UK-based nonprofit organization doing their part to help find a cure through means of concert tours and compilation CDs, with additional support from Analoguetrash and DWA Records. As a newcomer to the UK, this was my first Beat:Cancer performance, and I was floored by the immense support the audience and musicians had for the cause and for each other. But more on Beat:Cancer later; for now I’ll get to the bands.

The first performer of the night was Advance, a Scotland-based “Dystopian Electronica” band with a beautiful combination of both intelligent and danceable synth lines. Their music was nearly reminiscent of genre veterans CHROM and Neuroticfish, but with a wholly unique approach. Their live sound was even more full and professional sounding than their recorded material, which may be in part due to the fact that their most recent album was released 3 years ago and they’ve grown more as producers over the years. Their live show, while somewhat lacking in energy on stage, seemed to provoke the most energy in the crowd. Between industrial dancing and singing along to more than half of the songs, it was clear that Advance had already made quite an impact in the Manchester area previously. Tom’s vocals exceeded his skill demonstrated in the album while live synthesizers provided by his accomplice Kimberley added just enough push to the mix to drive forwards and deliver more to the live show than could be accomplished in a studio record. Advance’s charismatic and dynamic live performance was actually my favourite of the night, and I would highly recommend everybody else to be sitting on the edge of their seats just as much as me to catch their highly anticipated and long-time-coming new album.

The first co-headliner was the Danish/Canadian synthpop act Neonsol, a band iconic for their songbird-style female vocals paired with the deep and brooding vocals of their male vocalist and live synth player. Despite the high number of Neonsol shirts circulating the audience, they didn’t immediately receive quite the same positive response as Advance. I can’t help but feel that most of this initial hesitation held by the audience and myself was due in part to the performance of their live drummer. While they may have had reasons for having him along, I found him to be almost an extraneous member as he only played a midi snare drum, and hit less than half of the songs’ snare strikes. What made me most concerned was the fact that throughout more than the first half of their set he was playing severely out of time with the backing tracks and sampled drum beats, causing the entire live show to feel out of time and sit awkwardly. These tempo issues may have been in part due to live stage monitor levels being a bit low; any band will tell you how frustrating and common this issue is. But whatever the case, I felt it took far longer than necessary for me to be able to properly sink into their performance and experience it how it was meant to be. However, when the band found the pocket they were looking for, the performance quality increased drastically and created the dark and moody swaying pulse they’re known for. Their song Manipulation was, of course, the show-seller accentuated live by the rumbling voice of their male vocalist’s backing vocals. The stark contrast in sounds is and was implemented in a lovely way, and any fan of synth-driven music should find Neonsol at the top of their record collection.

Finally Freakangel took the stage. The Estonian industrial metal band has gone through quite a bit of genre evolution over the years, moving from harsh aggrotech to a significantly more metal-driven and hardcore or even metalcore-influenced combination. The live show delivered far more on the metal front than the studio albums, Art’s guitars receiving significantly more of a central focus, topped by an incredible and energetic performance by their new Amazon warrior of a live drummer. The vocal performance did seem to suffer somewhat compared to the album versions of songs, Dmitri mumbling or moaning the lyrics between guttural screams rather than a powerful vocal delivery throughout; while he may have been trying to convey a certain vibe to the audience through this type of performance, I can’t help but think that the show itself would have been stronger as a whole had all members shown just as much energy. Curiously enough, despite being the main headliner of the night, a surprising amount of the audience moved to the back for their performance. This may have been in part because of the stiff genre divide in the night, starting with synthpop and ending in death growls. It’s possible that most of the people who came simply weren’t metalheads and had come to see Advance and Neonsol. Whatever the case, those of us who stayed at the front had a fantastic time and I hope that Freakangel will continue to deliver such high energy performances throughout the rest of their career.

For those of you who would like to know more about Beat:Cancer you can find information at the link provided below. Even if you’re not based in the UK you can support the cause by ordering merchandise or a copy of their latest compilation CD featuring the artists who performed at this show as well as many others. For those in the UK you can catch the next Beat:Cancer tour featuring Sirus throughout the UK this October!

For HorrorAddicts.net this is Jeffrey Kohld Kelly.

Advance:

https://www.facebook.com/advanceaudio/

Neonsol:

https://www.facebook.com/Neonsol/

Freakangel:

https://www.facebook.com/freakangelofficial/

Beat:Cancer:

http://beatcancer.info/

MUSIC REVIEW: Night Club

Night Club 

Scary World

Review by Jeffrey Kohld Kelly

I’ve had the pleasure of gaining early access to the remarkable electropop and industrial influenced upcoming album Scary World by the LA-based duo “Night Club”. Scary World is slotted to be released worldwide on the 24th of August 2018 featuring the single “Your Addiction”.

Night Club’s production value is incredibly professional, masterfully compressed drums and seamlessly arpeggiated basslines building a strong and driving foundation for the music. Emphasizing electro synth wails and sirens accentuate energy and drive when necessary, but are used sparingly enough that they deliver a strong enough punch each time that it never gets old. Their vocalist’s gentle and almost tantalizing voice offers a beautiful contrast to the instrumentals, offering chiming innocence during moments of tension, and an extra dose of adrenaline when the synths take a back seat.

The album immediately sets its own stage and carries the theme unadultered from beginning to end. Yet, despite using relatively similar thick and minimalistic synth sounds and stylistic techniques throughout, each song proudly speaks for itself and never falls into the easy trap of becoming a parody of itself. The album climaxes with my personal favourite on the album, Survive, easily leaving me wanting more from them.

Night Club is currently on tour with Combichrist and Wednesday 13 across Europe and the United Kingdom on the “Everybody Still Hates You” tour, and I personally will be sure to catch their Sheffield date on the 10th of August. I would highly recommend for anyone else along the tour route to be sure to pick up tickets for a show near them soon as well!

If you would like to hear more from Night Club and order a copy of their new album Scary World then you can visit them online at NightClubBand.com or follow them on all major social media platforms.

 

Links:

https://nightclubband.com/

https://www.facebook.com/nightclubband/

https://twitter.com/nightclubband

https://www.instagram.com/nightclubband/

https://www.youtube.com/user/nightclubband/videos

 

Chilling Chat Episode 151: Tara Vanflower

 

taraTara Vanflower is a vocalist whose music has been described as ambient, experimental, and darkwave.

In October 1994 she became a vocalist for darkwave outfit Lycia. She married fellow band member Mike VanPortfleet.
Her debut solo album, This Womb Like Liquid Honey, was released in 1999. This was followed in 2005 with My Little Fire-Filled Heart.

Vanflower appeared on the Type O Negative song “Halloween in Heaven,” off their 2007 album, Dead Again.

She has also appeared with side projects Black Happy Day with Timothy Renner, Secondary Nerve with Daniele Serra and numerous collaborations including Oneiroid Psychosis, Numina, The Unquiet Void, Falling You, and Methadrone. The majority of her creative energy is spent these days writing. She has released Lives of Ilya and Violent Violet Part One and Two and will continue the Violet Series with several installments in the future as well as several other series that are still unfinished.

Tara is a fascinating woman and was kind enough to sit down me recently. We discussed the past, her writing, relatable fears, vampires, and her favorite curse.

NTK: Hello, Tara, thank you for chatting with me today.

TVF: Thank YOU!

NTK: You have a background in music. Do you feel it inspires your writing?

TVF: Yes. Though I also think that writing has inspired music. When I work with Lycia, I am generally given a piece of music to write to, so sometimes the music itself inspires the lyrics. But when I do solo music a lot of times, I take something I’ve written and build the sound around that.

I will say, other people’s music is an integral part of my writing though. I generally have a soundtrack of music in my head that sets a mood within the story.

NTK: What band do you listen to the most?

TVF: Wow, as of late I would say Chelsea Wolfe and Soft Kill. I listen to Drab Majesty and Black Mare as well. A lot of the music that inspires me is played by the same bands I’ve been listening to for decades now.

NTK: Did music get you interested in horror?

TVF: Not really. As a child, for some reason, my parents let me watch stuff on television that I probably shouldn’t have been watching so young…seeing as how it scared me a lot! But, I was always drawn to the old vampire films and The Omen…scared me to death but I was drawn to it.

NTK: Is The Omen your favorite horror movie? If not, what is?

TVF: I had a lot of detailed dreams when I was young about the apocalypse. I can still see some of the images in my head when I think about them. So, The Omen REALLY scared me. It’s definitely one of my favorite films. But, my all-time favorite movie is The Shining. Everything about that movie is perfect to me.

NTK: Is it the dream-like quality of The Shining which attracts you?

TVF: I love that aspect of it. I also love the lighting, the score, the absolute desolation. My favorite scene in the film is where Wendy finds Jack’s manuscript…pages and pages and pages of the same line over and over and over…and you realize right then he had been gone for a very, very long time. To me, that notion is absolutely terrifying. That this whole time she thinks he’s been more or less normal but THAT was going on behind her back. For me, one of the scariest things is the idea of losing touch with reality. It’s probably why I suffer from anxiety so much. (laughs)

NTK: You’ve spoken of your fears regarding writing and have said, “I rarely talk in detail about my editing because, truthfully, I’m insecure about it. Music I know and I’m comfortable with, for the most part. Writing? It’s like opening a diary. I am always fearful of people drawing conclusions and assuming things about what’s in the story. It’s hard to let go. It’s hard to put yourself out there to be cut down.” This statement resonates. It’s like Jack’s typewritten pages in The Shining. His writing bares all. How do you use your fear and anxiety to frighten others?

TVF: That is all something I really struggle with and it’s hard because I have a pretty supportive base for my music. So, venturing off into writing has been scary, but also rewarding obviously. I think there’s a lot of moments in my books where the characters have to confront things about themselves, their situations, etc., that most of us either get to avoid or are forced to deal with and do so poorly. I think I write a lot of my own insecurities into characters (fear of death, getting older, physical insecurities, etc.) probably as a way to deal with it myself. I don’t know if I’m scaring others or scaring myself! Most of my horror, I would say, is almost more internal. That whole, “losing touch with reality,” thing I mentioned earlier…afraid you’re going to lose yourself and never come back from it. I also have moments where actual monsters are confronted, but I think the characters’ bigger horror moments involve confronting their own fears and realities. There are moments in a couple stories I actually went through, though amplified. I hope people relate to those types of fears.

NTK: Speaking of relatable fears, what’s your favorite horror television show and what’s your favorite horror novel?

TVF: Oh man, my favorite horror novel? Is it too cheesy to say I really just like dorky vampire books? (laughs) I just love it. I don’t care if it’s “good” writing or bad. Same for films. I’ll literally watch anything vampire related and find something enjoyable about it. As for good horror shows, I really enjoyed The Leftovers, which to me is horror. I like Carnivale a lot. I don’t know, to me, “horror” is a bit like being detached from reality rather than blood and gore and such. The Walking Dead, for example, was great but has gotten…um…not as great the past few seasons.

NTK: Are vampires your favorite monsters? Do you admire the way they deal with the types of fear you’ve spoken of?

TVF: Vampires are definitely my favorite monster and have been since I was pretty little. I guess because I’ve always had a fear of time passing.  I can remember being very small and sitting in my bedroom thinking about how everyone was getting older and going to die, and I made myself cry. Geez, cheery little kid. But for me, vampires have always represented absolute power. No fear of death. No health problems. Control of their environment. I’ve always sort of been jealous of that, I guess, because those are my biggest fears. I’ve always seen them as more of a sympathetic character, at least a lot of them. Some of the ways they’re portrayed are obviously more “evil” and less “human,” but I’ve always preferred the more human vampires, at least those are the kind I identify with. I envy their power and timelessness but also see the angst all that would cause, which I also relate to being the Gloomy Gus I am.

NTK: Do you bring “human” quality to the vampires you write about?

TVF: I do. To me, it’s just more interesting trying to figure out how a being with limitless time and a whole lot of power would deal with the same sort of human emotions and frailties we have. They have to have the same questions…why am I here, what is my purpose, where do I belong, etc., and to me, it’s interesting thinking about that. What would a being think who has killed countless humans, seen more years than any human gets to see—how would they react to change? What would be new or surprising to them? It’s all fascinating to me. A being that’s jaded and yet still discovering something new through someone else’s eyes unexpectedly. It’s all interesting. Of course, they would have the same types of existential questions humans have. Or, they would be deluded that they are all powerful. Or, varying degrees of both. It’s interesting to consider it all. I try really hard to make my characters react like people actually react. I try to put myself in their shoes and react the way which seems logical and natural to them.

NTK: Essentially, you’re creating a vampire philosophy. So many people ignore that aspect when creating vampire characters. I have to ask—what did you think of Twilight?

TVF: What did I think of Twilight? (laughs) Well, I actually read the books and thought they were entertaining enough. There are many holes and aspects that are illogical and cheesy to me, however, they were “fun.” The movies are great cheese! And, anytime I’m surfing the channels and they’re on, I stop if I can. Do I take it seriously? No, but I applaud Stephenie Meyer for doing her thing and getting hers. The bottom line is, I’m not one of those snobs that has to only like things that are “cool.” So, I can appreciate all levels of awesomeness, from Only Lovers Left Alive to Twilight.

NTK: You have a real appreciation for vampires. Let’s talk about some of your own. Earlier, you spoke of dreams. Violent Violet came from a dream. Can you describe the creative process from dream to printed page?

TVF: Dreams have a major impact on my life. I have really detailed dreams like movies all the time. So, a lot of times, I’ll tuck them away for future use. I had a dream one night that my friends and I were hanging out and this ominous stranger was around and vampires were running amuck. It was so detailed, again, I can “see” the places in my head still, and when I woke up, I started recalling it to my husband. About halfway through, I just said, “Man, I’m just going to write this.” It was too cool to let go. Parts of Violet Misery were also from a dream, i.e. the creepy pumpkin farm out in the middle of nowhere. I draw tons of inspiration from dreams.

NTK: You spoke of apocalyptic dreams. Do you plan to write an apocalyptic story or book of your own?

TVF: I haven’t really thought about writing in that sort of style yet. I think it might be too bleak for me at the moment. (laughs) It’s something I seriously dread, especially now that I have a kid. I don’t like thinking about being in scenarios like that. I just get panicked thinking about keeping my child safe anyway, let alone imagining what I’d have to do during a zombie apocalypse. (laughs) That having been said, who knows! Everything I write from music to lyrics to books are all about love and death.

NTK: What do you have planned for the future? Any new books, stories, or music?

TVF: We are halfway through the next Lycia recording and I have a couple solo songs coming out on comps and I contributed some vocals for some other bands. I have three books currently in the editing process which I plan to release at the same time because they’re related. And, then a couple after that to release. I have some vague ideas for future books but have been sort of avoiding them because I know they’re going to be complicated with interwoven characters and timelines to figure out. All of my books are interconnected with characters so it can be confusing trying to put them all in the right place at the right time. (laughs) I’ve got a full plate!

NTK: As you know, Season 13 of HorrorAddicts.net is CURSED! Do you have a favorite curse? If so, what is it?

TVF: Oh boy! I don’t personally believe in curses! Is that bad? However, my husband has teased me in the past that someone cursed him because, back in the 90s, I made these ragdolls and stuffed them with all his hair he shaved off. That sounds super creepy now, but I didn’t think so then for some reason! Anyway, people bought these things and in the course of a couple years, tons of really bad things happened. Life altering things. The joke has been that someone took one of those dolls and cursed us.

NTK: Tara, thank you for chatting with me and putting yourself out there with your writing. It’s been a pleasure.

TVF: THANK YOU! This has been exciting for me because it is my first interview about writing. I’m so thrilled to be included.

Press Release: Music: Urn Releases Official Music Video

 

Displaying “Garden Party Massacre” 1st OFFICIAL FULL TRAILER.

Terror Trax: Interview with Rock Band BlkVampires

Interview by James Goodridge

BlkVampires are a iconic rock band, a part of the New York club scene. Fronted by lead singer Forrest Thinner, their turbo-charged rock coming from the dark side mixed with speak truth to power songs never fail people who attend their nocturnal night mass. I’ve got to admit when I first met up with brother Forrest at National Action Network head quarters for a benefit concert they were performing for Eric Garners family (Garner chocked to death by a cop for the  high crime of selling loose cigarettes) I did have a Van Helsing moment (looking for a wooden stake just in case). But after the set I now consider myself one of their minions. So for HorroAaddicts.net, I figured I would submit six questions to the brother.

James Goodridge: Tell about yourself and how did BlkVampires come about?

Forrest Thinner: I have been a singer for many years and into all styles of music. I am credited for starting musical projects like 24/7 Spyz the Fluid Fondation/P Fluid/ A.F.C. Angelo Moore, P Fluid, and Cory Glover and BlkVampires. I always had the idea of a BlkVampires concept long before the Blade film came out! Look at 24/7 Spyz “original logo and you’ll see it’s a vampire with locks and shade a NYC back lineetc … my total concept and that was in 1987 After nothing happened with the A.F.C. project due to Angelo and Corey on constant touring with Fishbone and Living Colour. I dived into the BlkVampire idea that I had all along. I put together for the group. I booked our first show and we had 90 days to prepare for it and that was our beginning. We had something to look forward to  and didn’t even know each other.

JG: What elements of the horror genre influenced the group?

FT: I have always been into “Hammer Productions” as a child. ‘Chris Lee/ Peter Cushing’ were the best! But KARLOFF is my favorite 100%! Boris Karloff presents/Chiller/Friday the 13th the Series/ The Outer Limits/ Tales From the Darkside/ Ronal Dahl’s Tales From the Unexpected! Man you don’t have enough time for me to my mind in horror. We BlkVampires really haven’t even touch the surface of the influence that I would like but I would say Hammer productions indeed!

JG: Have any classic horror writers influenced the song writing of the group?

FT: Not really, but I do like the mind of Anne Rice/ Clive Barker and Stephen King, but Dean Koontz is DOPE! I see music as he writes a story, kind of Twilight Zonish not really horror but off the beaten track.

JG: Tell us about the Eric Garner EP.

FT: Eric Garner is a single with a B side. Our bass player “Dokk” Anderson came up with the musical idea and our guitarist “Blu” added spice to it about a current situation in our society. And the Garner case…  I Can’t Breathe/Hands up/Don’t shoot just was on my mind and the song wrote itself. I was just holding the pen. Rev. Al Sharpton and The National Action Network came after. Like attracts like.

JG: What’s new?

FT: I’m putting out a solo EP in May/June2018. some members of the band have other projects they want to finish and thats’ a good thing. My project will be (BlkVampires) I’ll just be doing some dark James Bond/ David bowie grown up man sexy DOPE shyt! A lot of people like my vocal stylings so imma SANG to them my appearance will still be the Harlequin X.

JG: Where can we get all things BlkVampire?

FT: You can get all things BlkVampire from our website www.blkvampires.net or DM us at www.blkvampires.net  Thank you for your support!


jamesgoodridge headshot

Born and raised in the Bronx, James is new to writing speculative fiction. After ten years as an artist representative and paralegal James decided in 2013 to make a better commitment to writing.Currently, he is writing a series of short “Twilight Zone” inspired stories from the world of art, (The Artwork) and a diesel/punkfunk saga (Madison Cavendish/Seneca Sue Mystic Detectives) with the goal of producing compelling stories.