Guest Press Release : OdditiesBizarre

Author: Kirin Johnson
Kirin Johnson is co-owner and writer for OdditiesBizarre.com. She is also a CNA and caregiver for adults with disabilities. She is currently pursuing a nursing career. Kirin enjoys expressing her knowledge on odd topics through blogging. Her favorite topic to write about is weird insects and animals.kirin-johnson
How I Got Into Creating Horror Dioramas
When I was a little girl, I used to collect bugs and create make-believe homes for them.The only problem was, they didn’t live very long. While they were alive, I enjoyed seeing them crawl and utilize my own creations. Unfortunately, I couldn’t show them off for very long.
In addition to make-believe homes (which were made mostly out of mini cereal boxes), for some scenes, I also added various objects. For example, when I was about 8-years-old, I made an ant farm. However, this was not your typical ant farm. It contained many red ants, a farm that was made out of 3 mini cereal boxes, and a little Freddy Krueger toy. I called the farm “Freddy’s Farm Of Victims.” The red ants were the souls of Krueger’s bloody victims.
My Inspiration: The TV Show Oddities
It wasn’t until I became a big fan of the TV Show Oddities that I realized I should get back into my childhood hobby. After watching an episode which involved Mike Zohn on a mission to find bugs for his customer’s diorama project, I got interested in making my own dioramas.
The big difference from back when I was a child is that today I am able to go online and find real dried insects. I no longer have to have living insects that die on the diorama forcing me to start all over again. I could now create dioramas I can keep for the rest of my life. With the many available resources online, I knew I can create scenes using virtually anything I wanted. Not only that, I could show off my horror art to my friends and family through social media.
Before I share one of my favorite art projects, I must mention that with all my dioramas (including taxidermy), all died from natural causes. They were purchased from well-known websites.
Zombie Insect Dioramainsect-zombie-diorama
If you love horror art, why not create a scary diorama? When I say “diorama,” I mean a scene using real dried insects. With an insect diorama, you can make a scene with the creepiest and funniest-looking characters. Fortunately, you can get these little guys for very little money.
This is a diorama I created using several real insects. The scene is called Flying Insect Zombie Attack. Read the story below, as well as the materials I used to complete the odd art project.
The Story
In a distant planet called Planet Lizzylick, there lived an evil dictator named Brainzilla. After murdering thousands, brave and very angry rebels kicked him straight out of his planet. His dismissal left him homeless and without any food or liquids. At this point, Brainzilla had no choice but to find a planet that provided all of the right resources for his survival. After flying through the Universe for three days straight without any nourishment, he finally found what he was looking for. The small-sized planet was called Planet Castle. Luckily for Brainzilla, it wasn’t that far away from the planet he once ruled. Plus, it had plenty of food to help satisfy his massive appetite. Colorful beings of small and medium sizes populated the entire planet. Sadly for these little guys, all of them combined were no match for Brainzilla. For food, he would eat the brains of around 50 heads. He survived by also drinking their blood.
What this mean beast didn’t realize after eating his last meal is that he probably will never eat again. That is, because the next planet nearest to Planet Castle was 20,000 light-years away!
The Characterszombie-2
Brainzilla: A flying lizard from Indonesia.
Tiny Colorful Beings: Three Sagra longicollis from Thailand.
Medium-Sized Colorful Beings: Two Sagra buqueti from Malaysia.
How To Make Your Own Horror Insect Diorama
Below is information on how you can design your own unique horror diorama.
Pick A Type Of Scene
Whether you choose a scene from your favorite horror movie, or create your own original scene, you have plenty of ideas out there. Once you figure out what type of scene you want to go with, it’s time to come up with a plan. You will need to think of everything you are going to need to make it all come to life. This includes the scenery and the characters (which in this case, would be the insects you are using). Of course, if you are putting your own scene together, you will also want to spend some additional time thinking of the story behind it.zombie-3
Think About Your Characters & There Specific Roles
Once you know what you are going to need for your bug diorama, envision what you would want the characters in the scene to look like. Since most bugs already look ugly and scary, it shouldn’t be at all difficult to find some evil-looking characters for a spooky horror scene. You can find a friendly-looking character as well. There are so many different types of insects (including non-insects such as those creepy spiders) you can find online for very low prices.
Basic Materials Needed
If you have an interest in creating a diorama using insects from around the world, I have great news for you: The project is extremely affordable. Plus, the materials are quite easy to find.
⦁ Basic necessities such as wood glue, a glue gun, paint and paint brush.
zombie-5⦁ The main materials for your chosen scene. You can find the perfect stuff for almost any horror scene at stores like Hobby Lobby and Michaels. For example, you can make a small scene with a small cardboard box and a moon in the background, or a larger one with actual wooden make-believe castles. Your options are virtually endless.
⦁ Additions to the scene. This includes items such as fake blood (for example, acrylic paint), toy weapons, background scenery and any other necessary accessories.
⦁ Insects (or non-insects, depending on the type of diorama), which are going to be the characters in the scene. You can find insects of many kinds through well-known retailers such as eBay and Etsy. You can also find some actual insect stores on Google.
For dioramas using animals (such as squirrels and mice), you can also find them on the websites I previously mentioned. Always check your state laws before purchasing.
That’s It!
Now you have the basic materials and a good strategy for designing your own insect dioramas. Just remember to be extremely careful handling them as they can be very fragile.

The NEXT GREAT HORROR WRITER Contest: 6 more days to enter!

ONLY 6 MORE DAYS TO ENTER!

nghwcontestAre you a horror writer who dreams of seeing their work in print?

Are you willing to perform challenges to win a book contract?

Do you have at least one horror novel to pitch?

Then you might be the…

NEXT GREAT HORROR WRITER!

Enter to compete in the HorrorAddicts.net horror writing contest!

This contest is free to enter.

Grand Prize (one lucky and talented writer will receive):

  • Novel/book contract.
  • Free edit of novel up to 50,000 words.
  • Short story contract with HorrorAddicts.net “Horror Bites” series.
  • Horror Writer gift box. Supplies and inspiration for the Next Great Horror Writer.

Mini-Prizes- Episode specific (one winner from each challenge will receive one of the following):

  • A read of your work for podcast and promotion
  • Feature on another horror news podcast of your non-fiction work
  • Audio drama produced for podcast and promotion
  • 4 different publication contracts for shorts.
  • A sketch of your character by an anime artist.
  • Short story contract with HorrorAddicts.net “Horror Bites” series.
  • More!

*Note: Unlike some previous HorrorAddicts.net contests, you will not be required to produce fiction audio for this contest. The only audio involved in this contest is in the form of interviews with HorrorAddicts.net staff. The contest will be based on your ability to write.

Professional writers, editors, artists, and movie industry people will be involved in the judging including, but not limited to:

  • Author Annette Curtis Klause, Blood and Chocolate, Silver Kiss, Freaks.
  • Producer, Director, Writer Frank H. Woodward, Men in Suits, Lovecraft: Fear of the Unknown
  • DJ & Horror Host The Count, Cemetery Confessions, The Requiem & The Belfry Network
  • Author & Editor Dairo Ciriello, Panverse Publishing, Aegean Dream, Black Easter
  • Author & Entertainer Mark Eller, Hell Hole Tavern, The Turner Chronicles, God Wars
  • Author, Editor, Game Designer Jeremiah Donaldson, Plague, The Hunt
  • Sirens Call Publications
  • Author & Publisher Nina D’Arcangela, Bent Metal & Sirens Call Publications
  • Author Juilanne Snow, Days with the Undead & Sirens Call Publications
  • Author & Humorist, Timothy G. M. Reynolds, The Broken Shield, Stand Up & Succeed
  • Mocha Memoirs Press
  • Author & Publisher, Nicole Kurtz, Silenced & Mocha Memoirs Press

Basic rules:
*You must be 18 years or older. (Or will be 18 by March 1, 2017)
*You must not currently be a HorrorAddicts.net staff member.
*You must be able to write and communicate in English, even if it’s your second language.
*You have to be a newbie—meaning you do not have a book-sized publication for sale with a publisher. Nothing over 10,000 words can be for sale by anyone but yourself. So self-pub authors are eligible.
*You are committed to doing your best to complete in each challenge by the deadline and in theme. Challenges run from March 2017-October 2017.

APPLICATIONS CLOSE MARCH 1st, 2017

HOW TO ENTER

TO ENTER, copy and paste the section below and fill in your particulars. Don’t forget to attach to your email everything listed in the “ATTACHED” section. Email to: horroraddicts@gmail.com

———————————————-

STATS:
Pen name:
Real name if different:

Age:

City/State/Country:

In your own words, what does horror mean to you?

Your favorite horror genre:

What is your writer goal?

How many years have you been writing?

Why do you want to be the Next Great Horror Writer?

Social media:
Facebook:
Twitter:
Instagram:

ELIGIBILITY:
I understand that by submitting my name for consideration, I am in agreement with the statements below:
*I am 18 years or older. (Or will be 18 by March 1st, 2017.)
*I am not currently a HorrorAddicts.net staff member.
*I am able to write and communicate in English, even if it’s my second language.
*I have a full-length novel or novella ready to pitch to a publishing house.
*I understand I must not have a novella or novel-sized publication available for sale by a publisher of any size. (Self-pub is okay. Old book deals no longer in place are okay. As long as no other entity is making money from a book-length anything over 10,000 words–if in doubt, ask)
*I understand that the contest will consist of many challenges from March 2017-October 2017 and I am committed to doing my best to complete in each by the deadline and in theme.
*Writing, audio, or content I provide for this contest must be unaired, published, or otherwise distributed content aside from the final novel submission that can be self-published or posted only. More details on the content right will be discussed in the contract should I be chosen.

***Type your name here as proof of reading the above rules:

ATTACH:
*100 word story horror story. (doc or rtf)
*100 bio and list of previously published works. (doc or rtf)

David’s Haunted Library: Of Foster Homes And Flies

David's Haunted Library

51-jpmrearl-_sx311_bo1204203200_12-year-old Denny has not had an easy life, his father died and his mother is an alcoholic but he believes in keeping a positive outlook and doesn’t let it get to him. What he really wants in life is to accomplish something and for Denny that comes in the form of a spelling bee. He was too scared to sign up for it last year so to redeem himself this year he signed up and has been practicing non-stop. Life happens though and one week away from the spelling bee he wakes to find his mother has died.

Denny and his mother have had a complicated relationship that borders on mental abuse. Danny wants to do the right thing and call 911 but he doesn’t want to get stuck in a foster home and never compete in the spelling bee which to him is more than a competition. Denny decides that the best course of action is to keep his dead mother a secret until after the event which won’t be easy with the hot weather in New Orleans.

Of Foster Homes and Flies by Chad Lutzke is a brilliant coming of age story. This isn’t your average horror book, it’s more like a human drama with elements of horror in it. Denny is a child but is suddenly forced into an adult situation and isn’t sure how to handle it, but he does what he feels he has to do with a guilty conscience eating away at him the whole time.

Denny is a kid that you have to love, what he really wants is to be a normal kid but that can’t happen so he feels the least he can do is become spelling bee champion before he starts his lonely existence in a foster home.  Denny isn’t totally alone though, he has a friend named Carter and meets a hitchhiking girl named Sam. Denny never lets on what he’s going through and both characters still manage to help him in their own ways. I got the feeling that Chad Lutzke really understood how kids would act in this kind of situation because all the characters came across as real kids.

Of Foster Homes And Flies is a masterpiece, the length of the story is perfect and the main character may not be the kid next door but he wants to be. Denny is growing into a man but has no one to help guide him so he tries to figure out things on his own. He does a good job wrestling with his emotions and taking care of himself. I could hardly put down this book. I love the thoughts that Denny deals with along with the choices he has to make while feeling completely alone.  You have to feel for the character and I love how even when he does something bad he feels shame but sees it as something he must do. Of Foster Homes And Flies is a beautiful story that fans of all genres of books will enjoy.

Press Release : The Unfleshed: Tale of the Autopsic Bride

Press Release : The Unfleshed: Tale of the Autopsic Bride

By Lisa Vasquez

 

 

kindleimage

A plague has washed upon England’s shore, bringing death in its wake. While the sickness plucks the lives of the victims indiscriminately, something else moves in its shadows, using it as a cover. Victims without signs of infection have been brutally murdered and dismembered. Suspicions already surround the infamous Doctor Wulfe when his eccentric behavior takes a more sinister turn. His interest in the young Morrigan spirals into an unhealthy obsession. Angus manipulates her father, giving him hope of a cure in return for his daughter’s hand in marriage. But, when his bride-to-be awakens with an insatiable appetite, will she be forced to go through with the arrangement? Or will the plague save her from a deal made with a devil?

 

 

 

 

Purchase here: http://books2read.com/unfleshed

or here: Amazon

Guest Blog: Vile Vacations 7 Chilling Museums By Courtney Lynn Mroch

Jaunt to These 7 Chilling Museums…If You Dare

If you’re a fan of horror, the supernatural or anything else macabre, here are seven must-see museums you’ll want to check out:

  1. International Cryptozoology Museum

This museum in Portland, Maine, houses artifacts from American cryptozoologist Loren Coleman’s collection. “The world’s only cryptozoology museum,” is not just about Bigfoot and Nessie, however. Although, their collection does contain samples of hair thought to belong to Abominable Snowmen, Bigfoot, Yeti, Yowie, and Orang Pendek, and yes they do have a Lake Monster exhibition. However, they also display crypto-inspired artwork, newspaper articles, and movie props. One fan even created a Sasquatch baby for the museum made from a “reborn” doll.

The museum is closed on Tuesdays, but welcomes visitors the rest of the days of the week.

Website: http://cryptozoologymuseum.com

  1. Mothman Museum

Located in Point Pleasant, West Virginia (the “Home of the Mothman”), this museum is dedicated to the famous Mothman sightings and encounters that happened there from 1966 to 1967. They have original press clippings and video footage, handwritten police reports from the original eyewitnesses, and props from the Mothman Prophecies movie. If you want to delve deeper into this creepy mystery, this is the best place to do it.

Their hours vary depending on the day of the week, but they’re open 7 days of week, excluding major holidays.

Website: http://www.mothmanmuseum.com/

  1. Museum of Death

This museum has two locations, one in Hollywood, California, and the other in New Orleans, Louisiana. The California location was originally opened by JD Healy and Cathee Shultz, who “realized the void in the death education in this country and decided to make death their life’s work.” In addition to the largest collection of serial murderer artwork, you’ll also be able to see things like original photos from the Charles Manson and Black Dahlia murders, a coffin and body bag collection, and replicas of full-sized execution devices. They also play a lot of videos of autopsies and serial killer interviews. There is no age limit to enter the museum, but they do suggest it’s more suitable for more mature audiences.

The New Orleans location is open 7 days a week from 10 am – 7 pm. The Hollywood location is also open 7 days a week, but their hours vary depending on the day.

Website: http://www.museumofdeath.net/

  1. Salem Witch Museum

The creepiest thing about this museum located in Salem, Massachusetts, is how ignorance and fear can lead people to commit heinous acts against each other. Twenty people lost their lives during the Witch Trials of 1692. This museum brings their stories to life. A combination of stage sets and live guides educates visitors about what was happening during that point of history that facilitated the witch-hunts. They also discuss witch stereotypes and explain witchcraft today.

The museum is open 10 am – 5 pm daily (and until 7 pm July and August). They’re also open year-round except for Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s Day, with extended hours in October.

Website: https://www.salemwitchmuseum.com/

Ghosts in the empty town. Against the background of a Gothic castle

  1. The Hollywood Horror Museum

This museum hasn’t officially opened in its physical location (it’s due to in 2019), but it is also a traveling museum that will begin its “World Tour” in 2017. (Likely around October.) It will have two different sections, “Classic Horror” and “Modern Horror.” Classic Horror will be suitable for all ages. Modern Horror will deal with gore and sexuality so it will be more appropriate for teens and adults. Exhibits will include classic movie scenes, props, costumes and replica sets. If you are a fan of horror in any of is guises (books, movies, or TV), this will be a definite must-see museum as soon as it opens!

Website: http://www.hollywoodhorror.org/

  1. The Traveling Museum of the Paranormal and the Occult

It bills itself as the “only paranormal museum where you can actually hold real haunted objects.” If you’d be brave enough to do that. But that’s just it. Greg Newkirk and Dana Matthews, the museum’s curators, want the curious to hold, photograph, and even test their haunted and cursed objects. This museum doesn’t have a brick-and-mortar location, but it can be experienced in two ways. The first is online, where they have pictures and descriptions of all of their artifacts. It can also be seen at many popular convention and events, such as ScareFest, Strange Escapes, and at some Nick Groff Tour appearances. They even have a live webcam where they rotate haunted objects and encourage people to email them if they notice anything unusual.

Website: http://paramuseum.com/

  1. Willow Creek – China Flat Museum

This museum preserves history pertinent to the eastern part of Humboldt County and the western portion of Trinity County in California. This includes pioneer, mining and Native American artifacts as well as their very popular Bigfoot exhibit. You see, Humboldt County is where the famous Patterson-Gimlin movie was taken. If you’re not familiar with it, the movie was shot in 1967 and created (still creates) quite a stir because of the alleged real-life Bigfoot caught on film.  You can see print casts, photos, and maps in the museum. There’s even a Bigfoot research center there. Definitely a must-see for Bigfoot fans.

The museum is closed November through April. From May through October, the days and hours that they are open vary. This is one it’s advisable to plan your visit ahead.

Website: http://bigfootcountry.net/

*********

Courtney Lynn Mroch is the Ambassador of Dark and Paranormal Tourism for Haunt Jaunts, a travel site for restless spirits, which she created while battling cancer. Her novels include Beneath the Morvan Moon and The Ghost of Laurie Floyd, and she’s a four-time contributor to Chicken Soup for the Soul publications. She also writes horror as C. Le Mroch. Under that nom de plume she edited an anthology called Shadow People and Cursed Objects: 13 Tales of Terror Based on True Stories…or are they? 

 

When she’s not exploring haunted places or writing, it’s a safe bet you’ll find her on a tennis court or a yoga mat somewhere. She lives in Nashville, Tennessee with her husband and their cats, Tigger and Tabby.

For more about Courtney Lynn Mroch, visit her site at:  http://www.hauntjaunts.net

 

Guest Blog : Black Zombie: Hollywood and the 80’s Voodoo Revival by J. Malcom Stewart

guestblog2

Black Zombie: Hollywood and the 80’s Voodoo Revival

In the beginning, there was the Zoumbie.

What began as a mixture of the ancient spirituality, chemical sciences and social control practices of West and Central Africa ended up stranded in the former home of the Arawak and the Carib by way of the Transatlantic Slave Trade. Just as water wears down stone, what started as historical reality became whittled into mythology. And where there were deep roots, the stalk that grew from that dark, fertile soil became forever altered by the gaze of the European Other.

The legendary flesh-and-blood inspiration for the modern cinematic motif arose and walked through the jungles of Haiti and other Caribbean islands in those days, allegedly bringing terror and destruction to those not wise enough to avoid the paths of voodoo, the false cognate for the misunderstood, syncretic systems of religion alternatively called Vodou, Vodun, Vaudou or Santeria.

So, naturally, someone had to make a movie about it.

In 1932, Hollywood came a’ knocking and our beloved Zoumbie left his sun kissed isle to star alongside Bela Lugosi in the black-and-white Golden Age horror classic, White Zombie. A title truly intentional in its contradiction as Lugosi plays a white Haitian landowner who discovers from his black peonage the secret of Zoumbie creation through a process of hypnosis and drugs.

Lugosi then, of course, uses his powers to cement his control over the black populace while subsequently terrorizing his white neighbors, kidnapping a visiting American co-ed and daring her beau to brave the terrors of his plantation to save her.

The strange, occult powers of his character are almost of secondary concern to our heroes given his over-familiarity with the way of “natives,” causing the boyfriend character to exclaim that if the damsel-in-distress were to accidentally fall into the hands of the black workers “it would be a fate worse than could be imagined!” His comrade-in-arms admonishes him strongly not to even consider such a horror.

Never fear… The movie going audience of 1932 was spared the threat of racial miscegenation when the aforementioned boyfriend confronts Lugosi and breaks the spell of the Zombie. All was again right in the world. Except it started a bit of a craze for more cinematic distortion of the Zoumbie tradition, the biggest of which was the mispronounced cultural appropriation of the Zoumbie name.

For a while, our hero held sway in the imagination of filmmakers wanting to explore the field of culturally incorrect exotica. He had regular work in those days, showing up in such forgotten gems as I Walked with a Zombie (1943) Voodoo Man (1944) and the Plague of the Zombies (1966).

Then came George Romero. And like a lot things in the 60’s, there was a changing of the guard.

With Night of the Living Dead, the (pseudo) Scientific Zombie became the king of the block and our hero was forced back into semi-obscurity, through perhaps Romero gave a slight nod of sympathy by casting Duane Jones as a protagonist who shared some heritage with our ancient hero. But mostly, the original item ended sitting around the house, downing bottle-after-bottle of Red Stripe, waiting for his next close up.

Thankfully for him, the 80’s came along. And with it, a “real-life” novel length account from Harvard researcher Wade Davis called The Serpent and the Rainbow. Davis’ book, presented as his actual experiences with so-called “zombie masters” in Haiti during the final years of the Duvalier dictatorship. And with its publication came the most pointed scholarly disagreement among anthropologists since Carlos Castaneda’s “Don Juan” thesis that stole the 70’s.

How could it not help but start a new, focused sensation about the Zoumbie and the Voodoo system?

First up in March of 1987 was Angel Heart. The all-star cast of Mickey Rourke, Robert De Niro and Lisa Bonet was steeped in both anticipation and controversy. It brought together two of the most respected “Method” actors of the era, one of whom (DeNiro) had already won his Oscar and the other (Rourke) was an odds-on favorite to be the next “great American actor.” It also was greeted with tabloid buzz as Bonet was on thin ice with her TV dad and employer, Bill Cosby, due to the erotic nature of the film. Angel Heart was nearly slapped with the emerging NC-17 rating before some compromising cuts were made.

The film itself was an atmospheric exploration of the “Hoodoo” belief system, a American near cousin to Voudon and Santeria. The Hoodoo concept and practice, prevalent in Louisiana, Mississippi and Arkansas, sets the background for the New Orleans location for Angel Heart, as Rourke is a noir-cut detective tasked with finding a semi-famous singer who doesn’t want to be found. The set up, while simple sounding, is a complete misdirection for twists and turns, including bizarre symbolism, weird sex and DeNiro as a Brill Cream infused version of the Devil.

The film, which got a fairly favorable critical reception, was less than a box office sensation, perhaps weighed down by all the expectations of fireworks between Rourke and DeNiro and the gossipy infighting over Bonet’s role. Angel Heart has grown in prominence in the decades since, with many fans citing it as a conversation piece for unconventional horror. However, the really frightening thing maybe what happened to Rourke and Bonet’s careers after the film.

Hot on the heels of Angel Heart came The Believers. The May 1987 Martin Sheen vehicle attempted to explore the dangerous side of Santeria, the Spanish Speaking cousin of Vodun, as Sheen plays a skeptical psychologist who is drawn into the world of Caribbean mysticism when his son is threatened by a group of evil Santeru.

While The Believers brought some big budget production values to the subject, the script and direction fell back into some dominant culture stereotypes as the ultimate group of villains revealed had only a flimsy link to the actual Santeria tradition. Apparently, Hollywood hadn’t found much new material for practitioners of African traditional spiritualism in the intervening 55 years between it and White Zombie.

Fortunately for traditional zombie fans, the next year of 1988 contained a much more positive development as one of the decade’s legendary “Three C’s” took on adapting Wade Davis’ book. Wes Craven’s The Serpent and the Rainbow brought the spotlight back to the place where it all began for our beloved friend, Haiti

Released in Feb. 1988, Serpent took advantage of Hollywood’s renewed interest in voodoo. Craven, then at the height of his powers and popularity, dove into the trend by giving us the most “naturalistic” Hollywood zombie movie to that date.
Set on the island in the early 1980’s, our hero (played by Bill Pullman) is a biologist/ anthropologist /chemist (the script is never sure which) who comes to the island nation in order to find the ancient, narcotic powder used by voodoo masters to put their victims into a state of living death.

For Pullman’s trouble, he is kicked, beaten, buried alive and has a nail driven through his scrotum. But for his tribulations, he manages to do something thought impossible. Bring the undead back to life a second time.

Shot on location around Hispaniola in both Haiti and the Dominican Republic, Serpent still stands as a glorious, although slower-paced, exploration of the Haitian “voodoo” culture. The film takes considerable time to explain the theology and worldview of the Zombie Makers while also delving into the culture and politics of the proud yet troubled nation.

Freaky undead doings abound, making for some killer scenes. Zombie hands in pea soup, crazy chicks eating glass, a corpse-bride with a python tongue The topper of an undead Paul Garfield pulling off his own head to throw it at a freshly returned Bill Pullman was one of my personal favorite horror moments of the 80’ . And while it wasn’t a big hit for Craven, it’s remembered fondly by many fans as one of his most unique films, despite its over-the-top ending.

Despite the flurry of interest at the end of the Reagan years, Hollywood quickly returned to the modern Zombie model, pushing out the Romero clones with frightening efficiency during  the last 30 years. There haven’t been a ton of films Hollywood exploring the flavors of the voodoo belief (2005’s The Skeleton Key comes to mind), but that’s not to say our hero’s time won’t come again.

In 2017, you can’t go anywhere in the horror genre without finding a Romero style cliche showing it.